601 CE to 700 CE

Saxon Belt On Display For First Time

A rare, copper alloy Saxon belt buckle, dated to between 600 CE and 720 CE has gone on display for the first time.

Byzantine Exhibit Includes Classical Themes

An exhibition of Byzantine artifacts shows how the classical style of the Greeks and Romans carried over into the Middle Ages. The Road to Byzantium: Luxury Arts of Antiquity, an exhibit which runs through September 3, 2006 at London's Sometset House, shows a wide range of pieces decorated with classical themes.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 14, 664

On July 14, 664, Erconberct, King of Kent died.

Bamburg Sword Unlike Any Other in the World

Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have declared a 7th century sword, discovered at Bamburgh Castle in 1960, unique in the world.

Rare Exmoor ponies to help save dwindling peat bog

Ponies from an endangered breed, descended from the original British "hill ponies," are being brought into a nature preserve on the Solway Plain in England, to graze away grasses that threaten one of the area's few remaining peat bogs.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 20, 635

On May 20, 635, an invading Northumbrian army was soundly trounced by the Picts under the command of King Bridei.

7th Century Cambodian Ship Discovered

Cambodian archaeologists have discovered the remains of a wooden sailing ship thought to date back to the 7th century, pre-Angkorian Nokor Phnom era.

Mass Gravesite Discovered Dating to 616 A.D.

A war grave found near Chester, England, has helped to locate the earliest firmly identified battlefield site in England.

7th Century Chinese Palace Discovered

Chinese archeologists are thrilled with the recent discovery of the grand gate of the Daming Palace, "the largest imperial architectural complex of the Tang Dynasty (618-907)". The Vermillion Phoenix Gate had five doorways, making it the largest palace gate in Chinese history.

6th Century Saxon Warrior & Horse May Stay in England

Ambitious plans to house at a Suffolk museum the "internationally important" discovery of the skeleton of a Saxon warrior buried with his horse have been launched.

7th Century Skeletons Discovered in Malmesbury

While digging the foundations for an expansion of the Old Bell Hotel in Malmesbury, England, workers discovered two skeletons believed to date back to 675 A.D.

Iona II

Archaeologists working in Scotland believe they have found the site of a second monastery founded in the 6th century by St. Columba, founder of Iona.

Bad Teeth a Medieval Myth?

Professor Wolfgang Arnold, from the University of Witten/Herdecke, believes that medieval peasants may have had better teeth than modern men because they chewed their food and ate raw vegetables.

The Mystery Stones of Hexham Abbey

Legend says that the huge stones of Hexham Abbey's crypt were the work of giants, but now archaeologists believe that they were probably stolen from Roman bridges.

New exhibit on ancient Yemeni art at the Sackler

"Caravan Kingdoms: Yemen and the Ancient Incense Trade" is now on display at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in Washington, DC.

"Early British Kingdoms" Offers Roadmap to British History

David Nash Ford's Early British Kingdoms website provides a virtual roadmap of the Celtic nations from Roman times through the "Dark Ages."

Selviergard to Invest New Baron & Baroness

Viscount Syr Georg of Glaciers Edge and Viscountess Katrazina Porajski will be the new Baron and Baroness of Selviergard in the Principality of Oertha.

Anglo-Saxon Pendant Declared Treasure

An early 7th century oval pendant discovered near West Shropshire, England, has been declared a treasure by the coroner at the Shrewsbury Coroner's Court.

Archaeologists Seek Tombs of Bulgarian Khans

Excavations are being carried out around the site of the ancient Bulgarian city of Pliska in hopes of finding the mausoleum containing the remains of the country's rulers.

"Gullgubber" Discovered in Norway

Eleven small, golden reliefs, called Gullgubber or golden old men, have been discoverd in eastern Norway. The objects date to the 7th century CE.

Loch Lomond Site Offers Wealth of Artifacts

Archaeologists working on a site near Loch Lomond have discovered evidence of settlements dating back 3500 years, including a 7th century Christian cemetery.

Somerled: Scotland's Unsung Hero

If it weren't for Somerled, Scotland's unsung hero, residents of the country might be speaking Norwegian.

Picts: Barbarians or Cultured Artists?

The "pestulant" Picts of legend may actually have been "a highly sophisticated people with an intimate knowledge of the Bible and Roman classical literature."

Herald: 6th Century Christian Cemetery Found in Scottish Quarry

Workers excavating a quarry in Forfar, Scotland have discovered 17 graves dating back to the dawn of Christianity in the country.

Garnet and Gold Treasure Found by Metal Detector

31-year-old Paul Devenyi used a metal detector to find a treasure recently in Leicestershire when the hobbyist unearthed a beautiful gold and garnet pendant.

This is Lincolnshire: Viking Braids to be Preserved and Tested

1,500-year-old braids from a Viking archaeological dig in Russia have found their way into the hands of research assistants at the University of Lincoln.

Roman Bridge Studied in Northumberland

A second-century bridge crossing the River Tyne in Corbridge, England, forming part of the Roman "Great North Road," is being studied by archaeologists.

Archaeological Treasures Go On Display in Docklands

David Spence, Director of the Museum in Dockland, has announced that the museum will display Saxon artifacts discovered in a dig from Southend.