601 CE to 700 CE

British Library successful in purchase of St Cuthbert's Gospel

In 2010, the British Library began its quest to own the St Cuthbert Gospel, a manuscript discovered in 1104 when the saint's coffin was opened after a Viking raid. The book was finally acquired from the Society of Jesus (British Province), or Jesuits, for UK£9m.

Excavations reveal medieval trading center in Northern Ireland

Dr Philip MacDonald, leader of an archaeological excavation on Dunnyneil Island in Strangford Lough, Northern Ireland, believe he has found the "Holy Grail of retail" with the discovery of a 7th century trading emporium visited by merchants from around the world.

Glassmaking at Glastonbury dated to Saxon era

Experts from the University of Reading now believe that glass-making around England's Glastonbury Abbey may be some of the industry's earliest in Great Britain. Chemical analysis will be used to date the glass, which believed to be from the 680s, the time of the Saxon King Ine of Wessex.

Early Pict language identified in Scotland

Highly stylized rock engravings depicting soldiers, horses and figures, dating to the 4th through 9th centuries, have been identified as a written language developed by the Pict society of Scotland. (photo)

New excavations may shed light on York's Saxon past

Archaeologists have long known about the Roman and Viking heritage of York, England, but little of its Saxon past, but new excavations of York Minster may shed some light on the unknown era.

Saxon glass industry at Glastonbury Abbey

A researcher examining excavation reports from Glastonbury Abbey has found that the glass fragments and glassmaking remains found there date to the 680's, much earlier than previously thought.

Anglo-Saxon ironwork reference paper online

In 1995, Patrick Ottaway wrote a paper based on his PhD thesis for York University entitled Anglo Saxon Ironwork. The paper is available in PDF format on the PJO Archaeology website.

Gold cross found in Anglo-Saxon bed grave

A grave of a young Anglo-Saxon woman lying on a bed has been found in Cambridgeshire. She was buried with a gold and garnet cross comparable in quality to the treasures found at Staffordshire and Sutton hoo. The cross was stitched to the woman's gown.

The search for lost technologies

For centuries, historians and scientists have bemoaned the loss of ancient technologies such as Greek fire and Damascus steel. In an article for io9.com, Alasdair Wilkins discusses both lost technologies, as well as the lost Apollo mission schematics.

Irish schoolgirl creates method to date ancient manuscripts

Sixteen-year-old Aoife Gregg of Loreto College, St Stephen’s Green, Ireland recently competed in a science competition. Her project: a computer letter frequency analysis of ancient Irish texts to demonstrate how the language has changed.

Phantom Time Hypothesis wipes out 300 years of the Dark Ages

The debate among historians of the Middle Ages over the years 600–900 CE has come to a boil with the Phantom Time Hypothesis (PTH), a chronological theory that contends that the 300-year period was created by Holy Roman Emperor Otto III.

Eumathios Philokales reveals two Byzantine churches in Cyprus

The Eumathios Philokales project, which focuses on Byzantine monuments, has announced that excavations at two churches have revealed earlier religious buildings dating to the 7th and 11th centuries.

The cultural setting for Byzantine-Lombard jewelery in the early Middle Ages

In a paper for British Museum, Neil Christie looks at "cultural and socio-politico-economic context" of Byzantine-Lombard jewelery in 6th through 8th century. (photos)

National Geographic Magazine showcases Staffordshire Hoard

The November 2011 issue of National Geographic Magazine showcases the Staffordshire Gold Hoard, an historic treasure discovered in 2009 in Staffordshire, England with an article by Caroline Alexander.

Anglo-Saxon burials reveal life of hardship

A 7th-8th century CE cemetery has been discovered during a patio renovation at a home in Warwickhire, England. The burials, probably part of a much larger cemetery, have revealed new insight about life for people in the Middle Saxon period.

7th century Christian prayer box found in Jerusalem

The archaeological dig at the "Givati parking lot" in Jerusalem has yielded an extremely rare Byzantine prayer box dating to the 6th or 7th centuries. The small box is made from stone and is decorated with a cross. (photos)

Remains of fifteen Anglo-Saxons given Christian burial

Last year, fifteen skeletons dating to Angelo Saxon times were discovered during a construction project at the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Bicester, England. Recently the remains were re-interred in a church memorial garden. (video)

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

Early Christian cemetery found in Ireland

A pre-Viking burial site dating to the 600s has been found near Dublin, Ireland. The site was discovered during construction for a power company project.

7th century burial site found in Fingal County, Ireland

Workers laying pipe for EirGrid were startled to discover human remains while excavating for underground power lines north of Dublin, Ireland. Tests revealed that the skeletons in the burial ground dated from between 617 to 675 CE.

Saxon cemetery may mark town of Hamwick

Excavations at a housing project in Southampton, England have uncovered what experts believe is the earliest cemetery for the Saxon town of Hamwick. Nine skeletons were discovered which are believed to date from the 7th through 9th centuries.

British Library raising funds to buy St. Cuthbert Gospel

The British Library has begun a fund-raising campaign to purchase the 7th century St. Cuthbert Gospel from the British branch of the Society of Jesus. The small book, with its tooled leather cover, was discovered when the coffin of the Saint was opened in the 12th century. (photos)

"Flood of people" settled England from Germanic lands

The British may have deeper German roots than previously believed. Archeologists and geneticists have recently shown that in post-Roman Britain, a few thousand German warriors may have overthrown the locals and replaced their Celtic languagewith their own.

"Death of a king" brought to life at Sutton Hoo

Visitors to Sutton Hoo, the Anglo-Saxon ship burial site in eastern England, can now experience the royal burial in a new way, complete with "smells and sounds to create an authentic atmosphere." (slideshow)

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.

"Senchus fer nAlban"

In the 7th century, seventy lines of text were created to record the number of men in western Scotland for the purpose of military service and tax collection. The Senchus fer nAlban (History of the men of Scotland) includes resources for the population of Dál Riata, the Kingdom of the Gaels on the west coast of Scotland. (photos)

Anglo-Saxon plough found in England

Parts of a 7th century "heavy plough" have been found in Kent, England. This discovery pushes back the first known instance of heavy plowing in England by several hundred years.

Mysterious Irish brooch has link to Greece

In 2011, a woman cutting turf in a family bog at Tullahennell North, Ireland, discovered what proved to be a 7th century brooch bearing the Greek symbol for Christ. Now researchers have linked the pin to a Christian community with ties to Greece. (photo)

Crusader "rest stop" found in Bulgaria

In the 12th century, crusaders were known to have stopped at the Byzantine city of Blismos along the old Roman road in modern Bulgaria. Now archaeologists believe they have found the city near the village of Zlatna Livada.

Cædmon's Hymn in Old English online

On his blog, Unlocked Wordhoard, Richard Nokes, professor of medieval literature at Troy University, has posted video of a performance of Cædmon's Hymn, an early piece of West Saxon poetry, recorded by Bede in the 7th century.