German

Digitized Gutenberg Bible to grace Morgan library website

The New York Times reports that the Morgan Library and Museum in New York plans to create a digital copy of one of its Gutenberg Bibles and post it on the library's website.

Scottish reporter soaks up German history in Aachen

Take a tour of Aachen, Charlemagne's 8th century capital, with a reporter from the Inverness Courier, from the city's nasty-tasting hot spring water to Frederick Barbarossa's 12th century chandelier.

Site of "dramatic Roman battle" discovered in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered a 3rd century Roman battlefield near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany which may rewrite the history of the Roman army in the country.

Waldseemueller map a mystery

Scholars are still puzzled by 16h century map created by German cartographer Martin Waldseemueller which depicts a vast ocean west of the Americas years before its discovery by Vasco Núñez de Balboa.

Digging up dirt on Martin Luther

German scientists are taking an unusual approach to studying the domestic life of 16th century churchman Martin Luther. They are digging through his garbage.

Virtual tour of Roman Cologne

A new website will soon allow visitors to take a 3D tour of the city of Cologne as it would have been 2,000 years ago. The city, a major trade center, became the Roman Empire's major northern outpost.

14th century cemetery found in Berlin

Workers at a building site in central Berlin have stumbled across a huge medieval cemetery containing 2,000 bodies dating to the 14th century. Many of the remains are those of children.

Viking sites proposed for UNESCO Heritage Sites

Several Viking Age sites around the Baltic Sea have been proposed as UNESCO Heritage Sites. The locations include Haithabu, a village in Germany, and the Dannevirke, a series of earthen walls.

Berlin slightly older than previously thought

An archaeological dig in downtown Berlin has uncovered evidence that the German capital is at least 45 years older than had previously been established.

"Crazy Days" characterize German Fasching

Gael Stirler shares research on medieval holiday season of Fasching, celebrated for more than three months from mid-November until Easter in southern Germany. Also known as the Tolle Tagge (Crazy Days), Fasching can trace its roots back to the 4th century.

Roman barge to be salvaged in Cologne

Portions of a Roman barge, dating to as early as the 2nd century C.E., will soon be removed from its muddy resting place according to archaeologists. It may well be the "oldest Roman transport vessel left in central Europe."

Galante Preziosen der Fürsten von Thurn und Taxis

Soon a new exhibition will be on display at the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich (Bavaria/Germany).

Little clock of horrors

Straight out of Pirates of the Caribbean, a 400-year-old automaton clock includes a skull that laughs, screams, bites and launches snakes from its eye sockets. (photos)

Atenveldt Baronial Yule Revel

description:
Let the revels begin. Their Excellencies, the Baron and Baroness of Atenveldt proudly invite you to ring in the holiday cheer with Them as They celebrate the Yule season on the night of December 15th, 2007 in the Germanic style to honor our beloved Baron Otto's heritage. So dress up in your finest German garb, tie on your bells and holly leaves and come join the revelry. In fact, there will be a prize given by Their Excellencies for Their choice of the best German party garb seen during the night. Location:
Barony of Atenveldt (Phoenix, Arizona)

Historian Finds Oldest Recipe for Bratwurst

A hobby historian has discovered the oldest known recipe for bratwurst, dating the German sausage to the fifteenth century.

German church moved to access coal mine

A 750-year-old church in Heuersdorf, Germany was recently moved to make way for a coal mine. The move happened when the village's 59 residents lost their battle to keep their church.

Nuremburg Castle stormed - with bare hands!

Crazy British guy (and Drachenwald Earl Marshal) Master AEthstan can storm a castle single-handed - and unarmed! A five-minute video posted on YouTube demonstrates how. Stop!

Dürer exhibit at the Blanton Museum of Art

The Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas will present a major exhibit of the works of Germany artist Albrecht Dürer September 8-November 25, 2007.

Australian Historical Swordplay Conference 2007

description:
Australian Historical Swordplay Conference 2007: German Medieval & Renaissance Martial Arts

Saturday 22nd to Monday 24th September
Greensbourough Secondary College,
Victoria,Greensbrough, Victoria, Australia

The AHSF Conference 07 website is up. You can find it here:
http://events.swordplay.org.au/

The Con will cost $185 for early birds. The price will rise, so sign up Location:
Australian Historical Swordplay Federation (Greensbrough, Australia)

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe, is a nonfiction history book set in 13th-century medieval Europe and follows the story of the four daughters of Count Raymond Berenger V and Beatrice of Savoy.

16th Century Gun Powder Flask-Sundial Compass Watch

The "Swiss-Army-knife" of its time, a gunpowder flask/sundial compass watch is featured in a watch enthusiasts' blog complete with a large, detailed photo. The object was created in Germany around 1590.

16th Century Clothing -Swiss!

I need some help researching and recreating clothing for my personna. He is a mid 16th century Swiss (Canton of Bern, somewhere rural) Anabaptist. The main difficulty here is finding just what the early Anabaptists dressed like, my research has led me to believe it will be something of a simplified version of common peasant clothes of that time -peasant clothes are hard to find too. I already (mostly) know about regular shirts, pants, etc. What I need to know is what would be authentic regarding Jackets/coats, vests, etc.

Merovingian treasures displayed in Russia

The Pushkin Museum of Fine art in Russia will display a collection of Merovingian artifacts. The museum is located in Moscow.

Thousands of historical treasures found in German mud

Constructions workers in Cologne, Germany have discovered a 3rd century stone tablet dedicated to the god Jupiter. The tablet is just one of over 10,000 artifacts unearthed from the construction site.

Midwinter's Dance

description:
A day of feasting and merriment awaits you in our hall on the 27th of January 2007 at St Martin's-in-the-Field Episcopal Church in Severna Park, Maryland.

Our Baron and Baroness call on all artisans to come display their wares. From those of their subjects, they will be choosing their champion, but competitions and displays are open to all. In addition, we plan to have gaming, singing, instrumental music, as Location:
Barony of Lochmere (Severna Park, Maryland)

"per manus sororum" published in German

The book of Tanja Kohwagner-Nikolai "per manus sororum" - a great book about mediaeval Klosterstich tapestries from the Low German language area is now available at the publishing house Martin Meidenbauer Verlagsbuchhandlung.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 7, 1539

On December 7, 1539, Martin Luther granted Philip, Landgrave of Hesse a confessor's dispensation to marry a second wife, although his first wife was still living and not divorced. Christine of Saxony, described as "unattractive and sickly," apparently favored her husband's plan to marry again.

Chimney Sweeps Face Change to Ancient Trade

German chimney sweeps, their jobs protected by law since the Middle Ages, now face competition from sweeps immigrating from other European countries.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 15, 1518

On October 15, 1518, Martin Luther was summoned before a Papal legate in Augsburg, Germany, but refused to recant his 95 Theses.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 7, 1543

Hans Holbein the Younger, the northern Renaissance portraitist who painted many Tudor notables including Henry VIII and at least two of his wives, died on October 7, 1543.