German

Mystery of the Berlin Mummies

Unlike the famous mummies of Egypt, the preserved corpses lying in the crypt of a Berlin church are almost unknown. Although they are nearer to us in space, time and philosophy, no one is quite sure why hundreds of 18th-century German nobles were mummified.

CSI: Middle Ages

The corpse was identified as royalty. Bones found in the Magdeburg Cathedral in 2008 proved to be those of a granddaughter of Alfred the Great: the Saxon Queen Eadgyth, the who died in the 10th century at the age of 36.

Oberammergau Passion Play tradition in peril?

For 400 years, the people of Oberammergau have staged the Passion Play once a decade as a thanksgiving for being spared from the Black plague. Now, a new kind of plague is testing the faith of performers and audiences .

German spire out-leans Pisa

The leaning tower of Bad Frankenhausen in the German state of Thuringia has tilted since at least 1640, and it now leans at an angle of 4.8 degrees -- sharper than the more famous tower in Pisa, Italy, which has only a 3.9 degree slant.

Early 18th century shoes found in German wall

Eight high quality shoes dating to around 1708 were discovered recently in the Gothic tower of a palace in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Students choose gladiator life

This summer, twenty students from the University of Regensburg in Germany are foregoing their usual pizza and computers in favor of Roman gladiator training.

Magdeburg excavation reveals remains of Barbarossa's adviser

Excavations at Magdeburg Cathedral have revealed the grave which experts believe is that of Archbishop Wichmann von Seeburg, a key adviser to Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbaross, who died in the late 12th century. (photo)

Video showcases 16th century German cards

A video on YouTube exhibits and describes a deck of German playing cards from the 16th century CE.

Ansteorra to host Known World Party at Gulf Wars

Duke Ulstead the Unsteady as announced that the Kingdom of Ansteorra will host the Known World Party at Gulf Wars 19 on March 19, 2010.

Known World Party

GULF WARS 19 KNOWNE WORLD PARTY!!!

Archaeologists may have found Princess Eadgyth's body

If tests support their suspicions, experts from Bristol University have identified the oldest remains of an English royal. She was Eadgyth (pronounced "Edith"), sister to Athelstan, effectively the first king of all of England, who won a decisive battle circa 937 against the Scots and Irish.

The origins of Yule

In a Yuletide card, courtesy of Revival Clothing, we learn the origins of "Yule" from its pagan Germanic beginnings through its joining with the Christmas festival during the reign of Haakon the Good. The article includes a bibliography.

Waldseemüller Map featured in Smithsonian Magazine article

The December 2009 issue of Smithsonian Magazine features an article on the Waldseemüller Map, an early 16th century chart which "changed the way people thought about the world."

[ATE] Barony of Atenveldt Yule

Their Excellencies Edward and Annalies bid you join them for a St Nicholas Eve Revel. To honor Their Excellencies please wear German Garments to help set the theme for the event. Mark your calendars and join us for a glorious time of games, dancing, feasting and contests.

US Army construction site unearths Roman settlement

A team of archaeologists from Mainz University have discovered what they believe is a 3rd century Roman settlement near Wiesbaden, Germany. The site was found during excavations for a new US$133 million Army Corps of Engineers housing project.

The St. Albans Psalter to be displayed in Germany

The St. Albans Psalter, one of the world's best examples of manuscripts from the Romanesque period, is a cherished possession of the the Dombibliothek Hildesheim in Hildesheim, Germany. The removal of its binding has enabled the Dom-Museum Hildesheim to display individual leaves from the book in a special exhibit which will run December 9, 2009 until January 24, 2010. (photos)

Living like a noble in Germany

Travelers to Germany who want a special experience might want to consider staying in one of the 50 castles and stately homes serving as hotels. Deborah Kolben of the New York Times looks at the experience of living the life of German nobility. (slideshow)

Photos from 15th century costuming exhibits at the Germanisches Nationalmuseu

Frau Anna Syveken reports that she has posted photos taken at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum in Nuremburg relating to 15th century costuming.

2000 year anniversary of Battle of Teutoburg Forest to be celebrated

Tourists in western Germany who have an interest in history may want to seek out the site of the Battle of Teutoburg Forest, or Varusschlacht, as it is called in German, a 1st century epic fight between an alliance of Germanic tribes and Roman legions. The site is located near Osnabrueck.

13th century shoe found in Magdeburg

Archaeologists have discovered a well-preserved sheepskin shoe dating to the 13th century at a dig near Magdeburg, Germany. “Shoe finds of this type from the Gothic period occur very seldom in Central Europe,” said Heiko Breuer, an antiquities restoration expert from the State Museum for Prehistory Saxony-Anhalt in Halle. (photo)

Gutenberg Bible extract used as book binding

A library assistant in Colmar, France has discovered what is believed to be an extract from the Gutenberg Bible being used as part of the binding of another book.

Airtight latrine preserves centuries-old broom

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a 300-year-old, perfectly-preserved broom in the excavated latrine of the St. Ulrich Church monastery in Paderborn, Germany. (photo)

Solving Charlemagne's brainteasers

Charlemagne liked a challenge, and he believed that the youth of his empire should be challenged as well. For that reason he commissioned an English scholar named Alcuin to compile Problems to Sharpen the Young, a collection of puzzles and brainteasers.

Thousands of historical documents lost in building collapse

The City Archives building in Cologne, Germany collapsed unexpectedly on March 3, 2009. Six stories of archival storage were destroyed, including documents dating from the 10th century and the minutes of Cologne town council meetings recorded in an unbroken line back to 1376.

650-year-old perfume bottle survives the Black Death

Maev Kennedy takes a tour around the treasures of the Black Death exhibition at The Wallace Collection, London, including a tiny perfume bottle that was owned by a victim of a superstitious anti-plague pogrom.

Jewish treasures on display in England

The Treasures of the Black Death exhibit at London's Wallace Collection showcase two hoards of medieval jewelry dating to the 14th century. The treasures were owned - and buried with - Jewish families who perished during the Black Plague. (photos)

German penny brings 34,000 Euros

A tiny silver penny, minted in the time of King Pippin III of the Franks, was recently sold at auction for EU€34,000.

Digitized Gutenberg Bible to grace Morgan library website

The New York Times reports that the Morgan Library and Museum in New York plans to create a digital copy of one of its Gutenberg Bibles and post it on the library's website.

Scottish reporter soaks up German history in Aachen

Take a tour of Aachen, Charlemagne's 8th century capital, with a reporter from the Inverness Courier, from the city's nasty-tasting hot spring water to Frederick Barbarossa's 12th century chandelier.

Site of "dramatic Roman battle" discovered in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered a 3rd century Roman battlefield near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany which may rewrite the history of the Roman army in the country.