German

[ART] 12th Night

Please join the Shire of Bronzehelm as we welcome in a new year!

World's "most popular beverage" might have roots in Patagonia

15th century Bavarian lager beer may have an unlikely parentage: a blend of German yeast with one found in the beech forests of Patagonia in southern Argentina, and brought to Germany aboard European ships.

16th century artillery and fireworks book digitized

The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (Bavarian State Library) has digitized, and made available online, the Artilleriebuch by Walther Litzelmann, originally published in 1582.

The mystery of the medieval tunnels

Hundreds of narrow tunnels called "Erdstalls" can be found throughout the Bavarian region of Germany and Austria. While most experts agree that they are medieval, no one knows why they were built or how they were used. This has led to the Erstalls being called "Central Europe's last great mystery."

[ART] Lochtoberfest

As fair München prepares to celebrate its 178th Oktoberfest, the Barony of Loch Salann invites you to be exceptionally creative about your anachronisms and join us in a lighthearted mimicry of an event that didn’t have its inception until 1810.

Ruling with an iron hand - literally

In the early 16th century, Gottfried “Götz” von Berlichingen, a knight  - and rogue - of the Holy Roman Empire, found his hand ripped off by a cannonball during the Siege of Landshut. This did not stop the staunch German, however, who had an iron prosthetic crafted to replace the appendage. PG-13 for language.

"Flood of people" settled England from Germanic lands

The British may have deeper German roots than previously believed. Archeologists and geneticists have recently shown that in post-Roman Britain, a few thousand German warriors may have overthrown the locals and replaced their Celtic languagewith their own.

Medieval occupational names

Looking for an SCA name? If so, you might want to investigate Der Haus Buecher der Nuernberger Zwoelfbruederstifungen which offers a list of medieval occupational names.

The leaning tower of... Suurhusen?

Pisa, it seems, has a rival for world's "farthest leaning tower." A church in the small northern German town of Suurhusen, among others in Germany and Switzerland, now claims to have the most crooked building with an angle of 5.19 degrees. (photo)

15th century book appears at Utah fundraiser

Salt Lake City book dealer Ken Sanders didn't expect much when working a fundraider in Sandy, Utah. His boredom was relieved, however by the offer for appraisal of a tattered copy of the 1493 Nuremberg Chronicle, "one of the earliest and most lavishly illustrated books of the 15th century."

Lusoria Rhenana set to sail in Germany

A group of Roman history enthusiasts in Germany have constructed a replica of a Roman military riverboat. The Lusoria Rhenana is scheduled to take her maiden voyage in the summer of 2011 near Woerth-am-Rhein.

Dürer star charts auctioned

On March 30, 2011, the world's oldest printed star charts, created by German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer, were auctioned by Sotheby's auction house in London. The woodcuts were first printed in 1515. (photo)

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.

Teacher finds 17th century Bible

While searching for historic baptismal certificates to share with her students, Wisconsin teacher Debra Court stumbled across an old book. Further research has shown the book to be a hand-illustrated, German Bible dating to 1670. (video)

Celtic beer: more taste, less modern

“These additives gave Celtic beer a completely different taste than what we’re used to today,” said Hans-Peter Stika of the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart about the use of mugwort, carrot seeds or henbane to flavor Iron Age beer.

This week in barley: Two brewing discoveries in Germany

Thousands of charred barley grains have been found in ditches in the early Celtic settlement of Eberdingen-Hochdorf, Germany. The site may have been used to make beer for a nearby religious center.

Celtic treasure unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have found gold and amber jewelry in a Celtic tomb near Herbertingen, Germany. They believe the tomb belonged to a noble woman from the area. The tomb is part of a region that was an important Celtic trading center in the 7th-4th centuries BCE.

15th century apprentices leave their marks on nunnery walls

A plaster wall in the former St. Katherina Church near Langerwehe, Germany, bears the pictographic signatures of 15th century workers during a building renovation. (photos)

Rock star treatment for a Renaissance mural

An elaborately painted 16th century chapel damaged during the Second World War is being restored not with paint but with light.

"Vision" celebrates life of Hildegard von Bingen

Vision, a new film by German filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta, tells the story of 12th-century Benedictine nun Hildegard von Bingen and her "her frequent skirmishes with the male-dominated Catholic hierarchy." V. A. Musetto of the New York Post has a review.

[LOC] Feast of Saint Ursula

It is with pleasure that I announce the Feast of Saint Ursula, where we shall celebrate our third victory at Inter-College War on the trot (take THAT, Blessed Herman!) with a relaxed and convivial tavern feast in a late-period German style.

Decoding Ptolemy's map re-dates German cities

A group of experts from Berlin Technical University's Department for Geodesy and Geoinformation Science have cracked a 2nd  century map of Germany created by Ptolemy, re-dating many of the country's cities by 1,000 years.

Silver coins prove global trade in 8th century Germany

"The discovery of Arabic coins at the coast of the Baltic sea proves that there was global trade more than 1,200 years ago," said Greifswald historian Fred Ruchhoeft about the discovery of 82 Arabic coins in a northern German field.

Arabian silver hoard found in Germany

82 silver coins dating from the 7th to 9th centuries have been found in Germany near the Baltic Sea. The coins originate from Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, and northern Africa and indicate strong trade between Europe and the Middle East at that time.

Archeologists find gate in Danevirke

Archeologists in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein are excited over the discovery of a five-meter (16 feet) wide portal through the Danevirke, a 30-kilometer (19-mile) stone wall built across Norhtern Germany by the Norse in the 8th century. (photos)

[WES] Newcomers' Feast

The Shire of Pavlok Gorod invites one and all to attend the Newcomers' Feast: "A Royal Feast in Germany."  Savor the simple yet sophisticated dishes of German cooks of the 15th and 16th centuries.

Medieval monks meet 21st century "vellum"

Guttenberg on the iPhone? Really? The Bavarian State Library has released an iPhone app that allows users to download and view rare manuscripts. (photo)

Codex Manesse to be displayed in Heidelberg, Germany

In celebration of the 625-year anniversary of the University Library of Ruprecht-Karls-University in Heidelberg, Germany, the Codex Manesse, one of the most important manuscripts of the Middle Ages, will be exhibited at the library 26 October 2010 - 20 February 2011.

Medieval German lawbook found in Swedish cellar

Experts were surprised to find a handwritten copy of a medieval law book in the cellar of the Sundsvall Library in northern Sweden. The copy of the Sachsenspiegel is only the second known copy of the 12th century legal code.

Skeletons, weapons, clothes found from Thirty Year's War

Two skeletons and other artifacts dating to the Thirty Years War were found in Stralsund, Germany. Muskets engraved with the owners initials have helped identify the bodies as Hapsburg soldiers.