German

Proof of the 16th century shave horse

An article on the Popular Woodworking Magazine website weighs into the discussion of the use of shavehorses, a combination vice and workbench used to prepare wood for a lathe, in the 16th century with an illustration from a period German source.

German cloister windows grace English church

A feature in Vidimus Magazine, a journal dedicated to medieval stained glass, showcases twelve 16th century demi-figures found in windows at Holy Trinity Church, Hatton, Warwickshire, England. The figures depict Old Testament kings and prophets. (photos)

German debt goes unpaid for 450 years

In 1562 the town of Mittenwalde, Germany made a formal loan to  Berlin of 400 gilders.  Berlin never paid the money back, and at the agreed upon 6% interest Berlin now owes Mittenwalde 11,200 gilders, the equivalent of 137 million US dollars.

Fifth copy of "the birth certificate of America" found

Experts previously believed that only four copies of the 16th century Waldseemueller map still existed, but a fifth copy has been discovered between the pages of a 19th century book in Munich's Ludwig Maximilian University. (photo)

The legend of the Grateful Dead

Zombies are not just the stuff of modern movies and flash mobs. A medieval legend popular in Germanic northern Europe tells of armed zombies who rise from the grave to protect the righteous.

The exemplary life of Dolce of Worms

A famous elegy, written in the 12th century, extoles the virtues of Dolce of Worms, a medieval Jewish woman in Germany. The elegy, and its preface, were written by her husband R. Elazar who depicted his wife as the perfect Jewish woman. Renee Levine Melammed profiles husband and wife.

Exhibit reveals genius of Albrecht Dürer

A recent article in Christie's New Art Newspaper reviews a major exhibition of work by Germany's greatst artist Albrecht Dürer, The Early Dürer at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, 24 May-2 September, 2012.

Rome on the Rhine

If you believe the press, most important Roman activity took place in either Italy or Britain, but archaeologists and historians know a different story, as evidenced by the treasures of the Roman-Germanic Museum in Cologne, Germany. Deutsche Welle has a review. (photos)

Holy Robe shines spotlight on Trier

In 1500, the Holy Robe, believed by Catholics to have been worn by Jesus, was installed as a relic in the ancient Catholic cathedral in Trier, Germany, once the Roman capital north of the Alps. Since then, the robe has been exhibited only 17 times, and is currently on display until May 13, 2012.

New finds shed light on Berlin's twin city Cölln

Little is known about the city of Cölln, across the Spree River from Berlin, Germany, but that may change with the discovery of medieval buildings and nearly 4,000 skeletons. Cölln, the older of the two cities, declined and was incorporated into Berlin.

Folding chair has ancient roots

Future filmmakers of movies about barbarians may have to trade their traditional rock-and-fur decor for a Coleman camping stool.

Oldest German runes found on comb

A second century comb, discovered several years ago in central Germany, may lead to the understanding of early Germanic languages. The carved antler comb bears the oldest engraved runes known in the area. (photo)

800-year-old choir boys don't look a day over 19!

Even though the Thomanerchor of Leipzig in Germany is celebrating its 800th anniversary, its boys don't look a day over 19! Once conducted by Johann Sebastian Bach, the Thomanerchor is considered to be the oldest choir in the world.

Medieval monastery town to be built in Germany

A team of researchers and historians have begun a decades-long project to build a Carolingian monastery town near Messkirch, Germany using only techniques and materials from the 9th century. (photos)

Redeeming qualities of Attila the Hun

On the blog Past Imperfect for the online version of Smithsonian Magazine, Michael D. Blodgett tries to find "Nice Things to Say About Attila the Hun." The greatest, he feels was Attila's "refusal to be seduced by wealth."

13th century Jewish marker Germany's oldest

A tombstone, bearing the name of  “Frau Dolze” daughter of “Herr Asher,” has been discovered in Erfurt, Germany near the city’s Old Synagogue. The marker, one of 58, dates to the year 1259. Officials in the city have applied to make the cemetery a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site.

Renaissance stove subject of V & A ceramics restoration class

In an article for the Victoria and Albert Museum, Senior Ceramics and Glass Conservator Fi Jordan shares photos and commentary on a student project to clean a 16th century, free-standing ceramic stove. (photos)

Landsknechte to hold re-enactment in Germany

Landsknechte from around the world will gather in April for the Second International Landsknecht Hurra 2012 to be held in Oberzollhaus, Germany. The event has been created for members of Landsknecht.org.

Second International Landsknecht Hurra 2012

The contemporary world of landsknecht re-enactment is as heterogenous as the slashed and hacked cloth worn by its inhabitants. For years there has been dreams and rumors about an international Musterung to bring all sistren and brethren together for one great feast.

"Bruises and bloody noses are part of the deal" at Trier's gladiator school

Residents of Trier, Germany's oldest city, have become accustomed to the sounds of battle cries and metal on metal as more and more citizens join the city's gladiator school in its 2000-year-old Roman arena.

Pope Benedict to Canonize Hildegard of Bingen

The Vatican has announced that Pope Benedict XVI will appoint Hildegard of Bingen as a Doctor of the Church in October of 2012. The 12th century German Benedictine nun is also expected to be canonized in 2012. (video)

Activists argue for exoneration of Germany's witches

Between 1500 and 1782 CE, 25,000 people, including children, were tortured and executed for witchcraft in what is today Germany. Now activists, such as retired Protestant minister Hartmut Hegeler, are seeking to exonerate as many as possible of the German "witches."

Roman wine not to be opened before its time

Curators at the Historical Museum of the Palatinate in Speyer, Germany know they have a well-aged wine, but are unwilling to crack open the bottle for a taste. The vintage in question is a 4th century wine found in a Roman grave, which has stood in the same spot in the museum for 100 years.

Plea to save German "leaning tower"

The famous leaning tower of the Church of Our Dear Ladies on the Hill in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany is scheduled for demolition if funds to stabilize the tower cannot be raised. The tower leans 4.5 meters (15 feet) from the perpendicular, more than the leaning tower of Pisa. (photo)

[ATE] Kingdom 12th Night

As the end of winter draws to a close, the Kingdom of Atenveldt turns its attention to preparation for war, let Atenveldt's great populace gather to dance and make merry.

[ART] 12th Night

Please join the Shire of Bronzehelm as we welcome in a new year!

World's "most popular beverage" might have roots in Patagonia

15th century Bavarian lager beer may have an unlikely parentage: a blend of German yeast with one found in the beech forests of Patagonia in southern Argentina, and brought to Germany aboard European ships.

16th century artillery and fireworks book digitized

The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (Bavarian State Library) has digitized, and made available online, the Artilleriebuch by Walther Litzelmann, originally published in 1582.

The mystery of the medieval tunnels

Hundreds of narrow tunnels called "Erdstalls" can be found throughout the Bavarian region of Germany and Austria. While most experts agree that they are medieval, no one knows why they were built or how they were used. This has led to the Erstalls being called "Central Europe's last great mystery."

[ART] Lochtoberfest

As fair München prepares to celebrate its 178th Oktoberfest, the Barony of Loch Salann invites you to be exceptionally creative about your anachronisms and join us in a lighthearted mimicry of an event that didn’t have its inception until 1810.