English

Archaeological survey hopes to locate War of the Roses battlefield

Historical documents show that in 1460 a decisive battle took place on the grounds of Northampton's Delapre Abbey, leading to Yorkist Edward lV taking the throne of England, but the actual site of the battle has never been identified. Now archaeologists hope to locate the site before the area becomes a sports field.

Archaeologists wish for project to protect Roman mosaics

Nearly 50 years ago, archaeologists uncovered a pair of beautiful mosaic floors, dating to the Roman era, at Chedworth Villa in Gloucestershire, England. Now the floors have been uncovered for study, leading to a discussion of a permanent building to house them. (photo)

Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

Rethinking Henry VIII

For 500 years, Henry VIII has had a reputation as a womanizing villain, but TV historian Dr Lucy Worsley has a different view: Henry was a family kind of guy who just wanted to settle down with a good woman.

University of Leicester offers free course on Richard III

Starting November 25, 2013, the University of Leicester and FutureLearn will offer a free, online history course entitled "England in the time of King Richard III." The six-week course is the first history offering from FutureLearn, and will be taught by Deirdre O’Sullivan, Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology from the University of Leicester.

500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden marked

14,000 individuals -- 10,000 Scots and 4,000 English -- lost their lives in the Battle of Flodden which took place in 1513 in Northumberland, England. Among them was King James IV of Scotland. This year re-enactors and others are marking the 500th anniversary of the history-changing battle. (photo)

Earl of Sandwich risked health with frozen chocolate delight

In 1668, the Earl of Sandwich collected recipes for chocolate, a treat just introduced to England believed to be "unwholesome." His iced chocolate recipes are a highlight of a paper by Dr Kate Loveman of the University of Leicester entitled The Introduction of Chocolate into England: Retailers, Researchers, and Consumers, 1640–1730.

Charles Brandon's falconry vervel shows royal connection

Charles Brandon, the first duke of Suffolk, was a great chum of Henry VIII. In fact, he married Henry's sister Mary. Evidence of this royal connection was discovered recently in the form of a silver vervel found in a Norfolk, England field.

Bath Abbey threatened by its dead

Bath Abbey, the late 15th century church that looms over the Roman ruins in Bath, England, is under siege -- by the dead. Not zombies, but over 6,000 bodies, threaten to lift the abbey's floor and collapse the building.

Priory and brewhouse excavation tell story of monks' lives

The land under social services and government buildings in Bicester, England once belonged to a community of monks who worked the land and may have partaken of as much as "10 pints of beer a week."

New book relocates Battle of Bosworth

For centuries, everyone knew that the Battle of Bosworth, which led to the death of Richard III and the ascendence of the Tudors, took place on Ambion Hill, but new research by Glenn Foard and Anne Curry places the site two miles away by a marsh called Fen Hole.

Secret of Northamptonshire chapel revealed

Under an unassuming village church in Rothwell, England lies a 700-year-old crypt containing hundreds of skeletons, only one of two still remaining in the country. Why were they there? Experts from the University of Sheffield's Department of Archaeology think they know. (photos)

High-class tableware among finds at Ewell site

Roman Ewell, in Surrey, England, was once located along the Stane Street, between London and Chichester, and acted as a market center, suppling travelers with accommodations and food for their journeys. Now the Church Meadow Project is taking a look at the 2nd century site and what it can tell experts about its history. (photos)

Late Roman well offers insight into technology

A well-preserved, late-Roman well near Heslington, England demonstrates use of the latest technology of the time, including curved stone facings and a dish-shaped base. Archaeologists from the University of York believe the well had "significance in contemporary local agricultural cycles and fertility practices."

The stonemasons of Lincoln

Medieval cathedrals are awe-inspiring. Equally inspiring are the stonemasons and carvers who originally built the structures and who keep them maintained to this very day. The BBC has a short video on the stonemasons of Lincoln Cathedral, where construction began in the 11th century.

Piece of Bosworth Battle Flag Sold

A piece of Henry Tudor's flag, flown at the Battle of Bosworth, 1485, has been sold to a private collector. The piece of flag was taken from the tomb of Henry's standard bearer, Sir Robert Harcourt, where the tattered remains had been hung. (photos)

Richard III to be honored with Leicester museum

The Leicester City Council has approved plans to construct a UK£4m Richard III museum on and around the car park where the king's remains were discovered. The building is expected to be completed in 2014. (slideshow)

Marlowe novel sparks hostility

All Ros Barber did was write a novel that theorizes that Shakespeare's plays were written by Christopher Marlowe, but The Marlowe Papers, written entirely in verse, has brought back up the dispute over the authorship of the Bard's plays.

Are you a witch?

If you lived in the 16th or 17th centuries, would you have been accused of witchcraft? HistoryExtra.com, the official website of BBC History Magazine, offers a quiz. Check to see if you are in danger by clicking the link below.

Experts prepare to solve mystery of Lincoln Castle sarcophagus

During the reconstruction of Lincoln Castle in England, archaeologists discovered an elaborate, stone sarcophagus believed to date from the 10th century. Now plans are being made to open the tomb and discover who might lie inside.

The sad life of Elizabethan child actors

Elizabethan theater life may have been booming for playwrights such as Shakespeare, but it was not so rosy for children in theatrical troupes. University of Oxford professor, Dr Bart van Es, discovered evidence of systemic child abuse while researching his book, Shakespeare in Company.

Danelaw gravestone auctioned for UK£4,300

An unnamed London company recently purchased a 9th century, Anglo Saxon gravestone, engraved with a Celtic cross, for UK£4,300 at an auction by Duke's Auctioneers of Dorchester, England. The stone was original discovered "during road construction in the early 20th Century at Little Eaton, Derbyshire."

Knights In Battle present Feast of Arms at Fort Paull Museum

"It has been an absolutely fantastic day, really excellent," said Fort Paull Museum manager Gavin Spencer about the recent Medieval Day. Lucy Leeson of the Hull Daily Mail has the story. (photo and video)

Panels "hacked" from Devon church

Sometime in the week of August 2-9, 2013, vandals "hacked out" two 15th century, decorative oak panels, bearing the images of saints from Holy Trinity Church in Torbryan, England. The panels were part of a screen and "one of the best examples of their kind left in Britain." (video)

Lottery money to help Chester Farm

2,000 years of English history will be open for study thanks to a UK£4m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and investigate various sites at Chester Farm, in Irchester, England.

Branagh to bring Macbeth to New York stage

Sir Kenneth Branagh will bring his version of "the Scottish play" by William Shakespeare to the drill hall of the Park Avenue Armory in New York City in June 2014. Sir Kenneth said: "I am delighted that we have the chance to recreate Macbeth in this epic setting."

English heatwave reveals "X-ray" of Greys Court

Greys Court, near Henley-on-Thames, is an English mansion built in the 1550s. Now a major heatwave has revealed that the mansion was once much larger through "parch," areas of dead grass, outlining structures from the original building.

R.I.P. Lucius Valerius Geminus

Lucius Valerius Geminus is dead. In fact, he's been dead since the 1st century CE, but thanks to the discovery of his tombstone, archaeologists now know something about the Roman soldier who died in Oxfordshire.

Ancient horseshoe found stuck in a rut

Potholes may be a modern annoyance, but the recent discovery of a Roman horseshoe stuck in a rut shows that the problem is ages old. The 2000-year-old show was discovered recently under Liverpool Street in London. (photo)

South Kyme Festival showcases medieval re-enactors

A highlight of the year in Boston, Lincolnshire, England is the South Kyme Festival where medieval jousters compete and the proceeds go to charity. This year's festival featured two medieval re-enactment groups – The Woodvilles and The Knights of Skirbeck. (photo)