English

Conference reflects new interest in King Arthur

In recent years, archaeologists have renewed their interest in finding the historic King Arthur. At the Footsteps of King Arthur Conference in Glastonbury, England, experts urged each other to keep looking, possibly as far north as Scotland.

The dark history of Tom Fool

Each year, a jester is chosen to liven up life at Muncaster Castle, near Ravenglass in Cumbria, England. The custom goes back centuries to Tom Skelton, believed to be the original Tom Fool, a real-life jester believed to have a murderous past. (photo)

Look, Mom! I found a medieval pot!

Residents of Hilton, England turned out for several drizzly days of community archaeology recently when Dove Valley Community Archaeology sponsored a series of digs around the village. During the five-day process, fifteen pits were opened, uncovering coins and pottery from Roman times through the 16th century.

Houses scheduled to grace Fulford battlefield

The "most likely candidate" for the site of the Battle of Fulford, according to English Heritage, is Germany Beck, an area scheduled to be developed into a community of 600 new homes, approved by the City of York Council.

Greyfriars church next subject for Richard III archaeologists

Richard III has been identified. Now focus has shifted to the church where he was buried. The archaeological team from the University of Leicester, which discovered the remains of the king in 2012, plans to return to the site to further investigate Greyfriars Church.

William and Kate's housing plans delayed by proposed archaeological dig

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge may have to delay their move into Anmer Hall, the Georgian mansion given to them by the Queen as their new country home, due to two archaeological digs scheduled to take place on the property.

Photos of the Mary Rose

CNN goes inside the new Mary Rose museum in Portsmouth, England. The Mary Rose was a warship that sank in 1545 during a battle with the French.

CW premieres "Reign" in fall 2013

The BBC has announced Reign, a new drama based on the teenage years of Mary, Queen of Scots, which will hit American TV screens autumn 2013. The series will star Adelaide Kane as Mary and will begin with 15-year-old Mary's arrival in France as the bethrothed of the French prince Francis.

Old Duchy Palace restoration completed

Thanks to the Cornwall Buildings Preservation Trust and The Prince's Regeneration Trust's UK£1m grant, Cornwall's Old Duchy Palace in Lostwithiel has been restored and will contain a permanent heritage exhibition about the palace and its restoration in its basement. (photos)

London's "lost stream" yields treasures.

Beneath the streets of London runs a river of gold - not actual gold and not actually a river, but archaeological gold in the form of the "lost" Walbrook River. Dubbed "the Pompeii of the north," the thick layer of mud has been a treasure trove of Roman artifacts, from a gladiator’s amber amulet to entire buildings. (photos and video)

The mystery of the Lewes skeleton closer to a solution?

Experts are hoping to puzzle out the mystery of a skeleton found buried in a cemetery in the middle of the Lewes battlefield, the site of the historic 1264 Battle of Lewes, which "resulted in the king's defeat and the summoning of England's first representative parliament - as an 'early struggle for democracy.'" All other battle casualties were "slung into a pit.”

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

Exhibit showcases West's debt to Islamic doctors

In a new exhibit, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in London will showcase the work of early Islamic physicians. The mirror of health: discovering medicine in the golden age of Islam will be on display at the college's museum from 1 May to 25 October 2013.

Armoring Richard III

At the March 2, 2013 Conference of the Richard III Society, Dr Toby Capwell discusses how the royal armorer might have coped with Richard's scoliosis. The 30-minute presentation, with slides, is available on YouTube.

New Exhibitions Centre to host Viking ship at British Museum

The British Museum will introduce the world to its new World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre with its premiere exhibit focusing on Vikings, and will include the largest known Viking ship. In addition to exhibit space, the UK£135 million project, scheduled to open in March 2014, will provide research, testing, conservation and storage space. (photo)

UK£57,395 needed to "save" additional pieces of Staffordshire Hoard

In 2009, the Stoke-on-Trent City Council and Birmingham City Council campaigned to keep the 3,500 artifacts of the Staffordshire Hoard in their cities. Now the councils are teaming up again to raise the money to purchase an additional 81 pieces discovered in November 2012. (photos)

Scholars at conference debate cannibalism

Scholars love to debate unusual topics, a fact proven by a recent interdisciplinary cannibal conference held at the Manchester Museum in April, 2013. The museum is connected to the University of Manchester, while the conference is sponsored by Hic Dragones, a creative writing and literature organization based in Manchester.

"Romans Revealed" project allows children to "dig" into diversity of Roman Britain

A new interactive website, aimed at children, has been launched by the Runnymede Trust and archaeologists from the University of Reading. The site focusses on the diversity of Roman Britain by allowing children to learn about Roman residents such as the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady,’ a "high status young woman of North African descent who remains were buried in Roman York."

Public encouraged to participate in Navenby dig

The recent discovery of what is believed to be a Roman dwelling, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, in Navenby, Lincolnshire, England, offers an opportunity to the public to participate in a real archaeological dig. Work on the site is being sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and will continue until September.

The Shakespeare Conspiracy?

The world debate continues. Did William Shakespeare really write his plays or was it someone else? But Stanley Wells, honorary president of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and eminent Shakespearean scholar thinks he knows the truth and has gathered a small army of literary scholars to prove it: a new book William Shakespeare Beyond Doubt.

Plantagenet descendants battle for bones of Richard III

Descendants of King Richard III have launched a legal challenge to the burial of the king's remains in Leicester Cathedral, near the site where his skeleton was discovered. Sian Lloyd of the BBC reports in a short video.

Scholars test medieval recipes

Graduate students at Durham University in England were in for a real medieval treat when they participated in a cookery workshop using recipes from a recently discovered 12th century Durham Priory manuscript, considered to predate the earliest known examples by 150 years. The Latin manuscript was created in the 12th century at Durham Cathedral’s priory.

Archaeologists hope to find Roman fort in Midlands flood zone

After serious flooding, the Environment Agency in England is studying plans to build flood defences along the River Derwent near Derby in the Midlands, but before that work begins, archaeologists are being given access to an area known to be the site of a Roman fort.

Anne Boleyn redux

In her new book, The Creation of Anne Boleyn, author Susan Bordo aims to "strip away all the 'sedimented mythology turned into history by decades of repetition' and to restore a restless, learned, freethinking and ambitious but nondemonic woman to the throne of the public imagination." Jennifer Schuessler of the New York Times has a review.

Construction workers find Bath's Roman wall

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of part of the 4th century Roman wall in England's city of Bath. The discovery was made during sewer repairs to Burton Street.

Talking Richard III

In a podcast for the University of Leicester, Dr Sarah Knight and Dr Mary Ann Lund both from School of English, discuss the recent discovery of the remains of King Richard III and how it will change the relationship between history, literature and archaeology.

Tolkien inspiration on display in Hampshire

Eight years before J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit, archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler sought the author's opinion about a cursed Roman ring discovered in Silchester, Hampshire in the 1920's. The ring, along with a tablet, cursing any thief who thought to steal it, are believed to have inspired Tolkien's One Ring.

Could Winchester bones be Alfred the Great?

Archaeologists have exhumed the remains from an unmarked grave at St Bartholomew's Church in Winchester, England, hoping they have found the bones of the Saxon king Alfred the Great who died in 899.

14th century Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie comes home

A 14th century, hand-written copy of the Expositiones Vocabulorum Biblie has returned to its place of origin after surviving the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII in the 1530s. The parchment manuscript, which was created to help the nuns of Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire study and understand the Bible, is now on display at the abbey thanks to the National Trust which purchased the document at auction. (photos)

Mary Rose cannonballs early examples of armour-piercing rounds

The Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII found on the ocean floor off the south coast of England, may once again change English history. Scientists studying cannonballs discovered on the ship have found them to be armor-piercing, a technology believed to have been created in the 18th century. (photos)