English

Divers Investigate Wreck of the Mary Rose

England's Ministry of Defence has funded exploration of the site of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose which lies at the bottom of Portsmouth Harbor.

Court Jester Wanted: Must be Merry and Bedecked

For the first time since 1649, England is looking to hire a national court jester. Qualifications? "Merriness and owning an outfit with bells."

Archaeologists Research Bishops' Lives at Scotland's Fetternear House

The archaeological dig at Fetternear House in rural Aberdeenshire, Scotland, does not focus on finding objects so much as studying the lives of the residence's owners, several bishops.

£70,000 Needed to Save Britain's Oldest Theatre

This year's performances at a medieval Cornish amphitheatre, said to be the oldest working theatre in Britain, could be the last, as the community cannot afford to buy the adjacent plot of land from its present owners.

Archaeological Treasures Go On Display in Docklands

David Spence, Director of the Museum in Dockland, has announced that the museum will display Saxon artifacts discovered in a dig from Southend.

Late Saxon "charcoal" graves discovered near Romsey Abbey

Workers doing cleanup work around Romsey Abbey in Hampshire County, England, found more than they bargained for: 14 Saxon graves. (Corrected URL)

Chaucer's scrivener unmasked

A researcher at Cambridge University, while researching the history of medieval scribes in London, has found that the copyist who worked for Geoffrey Chaucer was a man named Adam Pinkhurst, who joined the Scriveners' Company of London in 1392.

Fourteenth Century English Pub Nearly Destroyed by Car Accident

Grizel reports that a medieval pub owned by the family of a friend was struck by a hit-and-run driver and nearly destroyed.

Elizabethan gold fraud centered on Canadian soil

Kodlunarn Island in Frobisher Bay, is the site of Canada's first gold swindle, according to Canadian scientists. The question: did Elizabeth know the truth?

14 things you didn't know about King Arthur

The article in The Tennesseean suggests that these fourteen "things you didn't know about King Arthur" will be surprises, but they may not have planned for SCAdian readers.

Painting of 10th Century Saint Discovered in Tewkesbury Church

A wall painting of an Anglo-Saxon Saint dating from the 10th century has been discovered at Deerhurst Church near Tewkesbury, England.

The Return of Boadicea

Queen Boadicea, in all her glory, is back in not one but four new films.

"Long Man" Chalk Drawing Newer than Originally Thought

The "Long Man", a figure drawn in chalk on a hillside near Eastbourne, England, may be much newer than experts previously had believed.

Arthurian Legend Appeals Despite Lack of Evidence

The Exponent discusses the reactions of Purdue University professors to the new "King Arthur" film.

Archaeologists Say Portchester Castle was an "Integral Shipping Post"

Archaeologists from the University of Southampton have traced Portchester Castle's past from Roman times through the Saxon era and into medieval times.

Scottish Clans Battle Over Claim to King Arthur

Clan MacArthur and Clan Campbell are challenging Cornish claims - and each other's - to the right to claim King Arthur as their own.

Grant Helps Speed up Anglo-Norman Dictionary

The work of updating a revised version of the Anglo-Norman Dictionary -- which will probably take until 2019 to complete -- will go just a little faster, thanks to a grant of over three quarters of a million U.S. dollars.

Garage Demolition Allows 13th Century Priory to be Rebuilt

The demolition of a garage in Gloucester will enable the original cloister of the Blackfriars Priory to be restored.

Cantaria

Cantaria is a site dedicated to passing on folk songs, mostly from Ireland, Scotland, and England, that are part of our common oral tradition and musical heritage.

Ancanar Manuscript Illumanation/Ilustrator Wanted

Ancanar: The Ancanar film project is looking for an illustrator with skills in illuminating manuscripts.