English

In Drake's Wake

Owners of a replica of Sir Francis Drake's galleon, the Golden Hinde, seek a part-time captain for the ship.

Cour d'Amour

The valiant Lancelot du Lac calls all gentle lords and ladies to tourney at his castle, Joyous Garde. Guinevere, the Queen of Love, and her ladies gallery will judge who is most chivalrous among those who test their skills within the lists and upon the field of battle. Come all those who would sit at the Round Table and meet in honorable combat to decide who will win the day: Arthur or Lancelot.

Viking Burial Site Found in England

Archaeologists have located the burial site of six Vikings who died around the beginning of the 10th century CE.

Discovery Channel: Wooden Carving Linked to Viking "Seahenge"

A wooden carving of the Viking god Odin has been linked to England Neolithic monument Seahenge, which consists of a giant, overturned tree stump surrounded by wooden timbers.

14th century brooches declared national treasure

Two 14th century brooches (one in 24-carat gold, with an inscription; the other in braided silver wire) found by metal-detecting enthusiasts have been declared treasures by the British Museum.

Historians Search for Boadicea's Battleground

Queen Boadicea, the warrior queen who battled the Romans in 1st century Britain, is the subject of a segment of the new TV series "Battlefield Britain."

4th Century Baptismal Font Reflects Struggle Between Christianity and Paganism

Gary Lee and Jim Wilkinson used a metal detector to discover a 4th century Roman baptismal font near Grimsby, England.

Lynn News: 4th Century Coins Declared Treasure

Charles Sproule, who uses a metal detector to hunt for treasure, has added to his collection with the discovery of five Iceni coins.

British Survey Shows Lack of Historical Knowledge

A British survey taken in conjunction with the BBC television series Battlefield Britain shows that a surprising number of Brits have gaps in their knowledge of history.

24 Hour Museum: Medieval History of England's Battle Abbey Uncovered

Researchers from Archaeology South East have uncovered a number of links to Battle Abbey's medieval past during a recent dig including an arrowhead and the remains of a monastery.

Owain Glyn Dwr and Wales - Great Battles in Britain

"Great Battles in Britain" looks at important English battles including the Battle for Wales.

7th Century Scottish Book Bag Found

The earliest example of a book bag has been found in Scotland.

Anglo-Saxon Princess On Display

The remains of a 6th Century Anglo-Saxon princess have been put on display as part of a £5m restoration of the Corinium Museum in Cirencester.

Bow Timbers of the "Mary Rose" Found

Twenty years after the Mary Rose was dramatically raised from the seabed, marine archaeologists have found the bow of the ship.

Medieval Graves Found in Berkshire

Archaeologists say they have found what they believe to be the biggest medieval burial ground, in Newbury, Berkshire, near the 16th Century Litten Chapel.

Bid to save manuscript for Britain

Arts Minister Estelle Morris has deferred the export of the Macclesfield Psalter, a 14th century manuscript from East Anglia, to its purchaser, Los Angeles' Getty Museum, to give British bidders an opportunity to gather the funds to purchase it.

2008's other big event is a mystery

Work is proceeding for the 2008 performance of the Chester Mystery Plays, a cycle of 25 Biblical plays in rhyming verse which are thought to date back to the 14th century.

13th Century Silver Cross Found by Treasure Hunter

A solid silver cross, inscribed with the word, "IESVS" has been dated to the 1200's by historians at the British Museum.

TV viewers select 15th century sites for 'Restoration'

British viewers of the program 'Restoration' have selected the Old Grammar House, built between 1434 and 1460 in Birmingham, and the Saracen's Head, built in 1492 in the nearby village of Kings Norton, to be restored with a grant of over 3 million pounds (over US$5.5 million).

Translating Tolkien: Text and Film

The New York Tolkien Society recently announced the publication of Cormarë 6: Translating Tolkien: Text and Film, a collection of non-fictional essays and papers.

"Kester the Jester" selected as England's new court jester

Nigel Roder, known as 'Kester the Jester,' has been chosen by English Heritage to serve as an official court jester at historic sites in England through autumn of 2005.

Divers Investigate Wreck of the Mary Rose

England's Ministry of Defence has funded exploration of the site of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose which lies at the bottom of Portsmouth Harbor.

Court Jester Wanted: Must be Merry and Bedecked

For the first time since 1649, England is looking to hire a national court jester. Qualifications? "Merriness and owning an outfit with bells."

Archaeologists Research Bishops' Lives at Scotland's Fetternear House

The archaeological dig at Fetternear House in rural Aberdeenshire, Scotland, does not focus on finding objects so much as studying the lives of the residence's owners, several bishops.

£70,000 Needed to Save Britain's Oldest Theatre

This year's performances at a medieval Cornish amphitheatre, said to be the oldest working theatre in Britain, could be the last, as the community cannot afford to buy the adjacent plot of land from its present owners.

Archaeological Treasures Go On Display in Docklands

David Spence, Director of the Museum in Dockland, has announced that the museum will display Saxon artifacts discovered in a dig from Southend.

Late Saxon "charcoal" graves discovered near Romsey Abbey

Workers doing cleanup work around Romsey Abbey in Hampshire County, England, found more than they bargained for: 14 Saxon graves. (Corrected URL)

Chaucer's scrivener unmasked

A researcher at Cambridge University, while researching the history of medieval scribes in London, has found that the copyist who worked for Geoffrey Chaucer was a man named Adam Pinkhurst, who joined the Scriveners' Company of London in 1392.

Fourteenth Century English Pub Nearly Destroyed by Car Accident

Grizel reports that a medieval pub owned by the family of a friend was struck by a hit-and-run driver and nearly destroyed.

Elizabethan gold fraud centered on Canadian soil

Kodlunarn Island in Frobisher Bay, is the site of Canada's first gold swindle, according to Canadian scientists. The question: did Elizabeth know the truth?