English

17th Century Shipwreck to be Protected

The wreck of a 17th century ship off the coast of Dorset, England, will now be protected from treasure hunters and unlicenced divers by the British government.

The Mystery Stones of Hexham Abbey

Legend says that the huge stones of Hexham Abbey's crypt were the work of giants, but now archaeologists believe that they were probably stolen from Roman bridges.

Anglo-Saxon Burial Site Discovered Near London

Archeologists have discovered the remains of an Anglo-Saxon settlement on Coulsdon's Farthing Downs near London, England.

Welcome to Cinderbury: Iron Age Theme Park

Visitors to the Iron Age village of Cinderbury in England can step back in time and spend a night - or a week - living in the village.

Elizabeth I to Tour the U.S.

Elizabeth I: Ruler and Legend, a traveling exhibition co-sponsored by the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, will by touring the United States between October 2003 and March 2006.

"Original" Shakespeare Dialect has a Southern Twang

This summer, the Globe Theatre in London will perform an "original production" of Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida using 16th century dialect as close as possible to what the Bard would have spoken.

Science Program Looks at Plague in England

A transcript of "The Plague in Britain," from The Science Show discusses the gruesome visit of the plague in 1665 to the village of Eyam, England with author Robert Lacey.

Thames Gives Up Secrets at Tower Beach

Tower Beach, the foreshore of the Tower of London, has been opened for a series of walks and talks by World Heritage experts. The series will discuss artifacts found on the shore of the River Thames.

New Research Project Planned for Stonehenge

A group of scientists has recommended that a new, comprehensive research project be launched to study Stonehenge. In Stonehenge: an Archaeological Research Framework, edited by Timothy Darvill of Bournemouth University, a plan is suggested to study the structure and its burial sites.

California Man Next Earl of Essex?

A retired grocery clerk from Yuba City, CA may be the next Earl of Essex. Bill Capell, also known as the Right Honorable Lord William Capell, earned the right to put his name forward and possibly be chosen by the Queen with the death of his cousin, the last Earl of Essex.

Times: St. George Inspired by Syrian Mosaic?

Experts are wondering if a newly-discovered mosaic depicting Bellerophon, mounted on Pegasus stabbing a chimera with a lance is might have been an inspiration for St. George and the dragon.

Medieval Charnal House Restored in English Basement

A 14th century English home, owned by a lawyer, has a secret in its basement: It is the final resting place of some 10,000 of London's dead.

Time Team Hunts for Roman Treasure

Britain's Channel Four Time Team has opened new trenches at Dinnington, England with hopes of discovering Roman gold.

Times: Saxon Rotunda May have Connections to Lady Godiva

A 10th or 11th century Saxon rotunda, thought to be part of a monastery, has been unearthed in Leominster, England during a geophysical survey. The structure may be connected to Earl Leofric and his wife, the famed Lady Godiva.

Reenactor Injured in Restaging of Battle of Northampton

British reenactor Kieran Robb was injured recently during a living history restaging of the 1460 Battle of Northampton. Robb was struck in the face and was reported in critical condition.

Lost notes on alchemy by Isaac Newton found

Researchers at the Royal Society, a British scientific association, have discovered notes on alchemy by Sir Isaac Newton that were previously thought to have been permanently lost.

Stonehenge Quarry Found

University professor Tim Darvill believes he has discovered the Welsh quarry where the bluestones, which form the circle of Stonehenge, were mined.

Iron Age Farm Discovered in England

Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age settlement on farmaland near the English city of Cheltenham.

Which Solstice for Stonehenge?

While Stonehenge is a popular attraction for those wishing to celebrate the Summer Solstice, the monument may actually have been constructed to celebrate the Winter holiday.

Major Display of Illuminated Manuscripts Begins July 26

The Fitzwilliam Museum and Cambridge University have teamed to present a major exhibit of illuminated manuscripts beginning July 26, 2005 and running through the month of December.

Gold and Garnet Anglo-Saxon Sword Hilt Declared Treasure Trove

Christopher Baker, metal-detecting fan, has discovered what is believed to be a sword belonging to a warrior from the Kingdom of Lindsey.

Archaeologists Set to Dig at Campsite of Edward I

Kirkliston, site of the famous Kirkliston Distillery, was also the location of the camp of Edward I on the eve of the Battle of Falkirk. A new archaeological excavation there may stall plans to build a housing development.

Roodee Highlights Roman Festival

A Roman Roodee, which includes chariot races and gladiator fights, has become a popular feature of Chester, England's Roman Festival. The event takes place June 25-26, 2005.

English DNA May Solve American Mystery

Is a skeleton found at colonial Jamestown, Virginia that of the colony's founder Capt. Bartholomew Gosnold? Scientists hope to solve the mystery by studying English DNA.

Ancient Britain Remapped

Ordnance Survey of Southampton, England, is set to release a new historical map of ancient Britain, complete with place names, roads and landmarks.

History of Plumbing

Ever wonder how our forefathers managed waste disposal? Learn how it was handled throughout the ages on the Plumbing World website.

"Da Vinci Code" Banned from Westminster Abbey

Producers of the film version of Dan Brown's bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code have hit another roadblock. Officials of London's Westminster Abbey have refused to allow the production crew to film there.

Shakespeare 2007: Arts Groups Plan Ambitious Citywide Festival in Washington, DC

The Washington Post reports on a citywide Shakespeare festival planned for 2007 in the U.S. capital, bringing together everyone from the Folger Shakespeare Library and Washington Shakespeare Company, to The Tiny Ninja Theatre.

British Numbers at Battle of Agincourt Revised

A new book has put forward that the numbers of English and Welsh troops at Agincourt was higher than previously thought and that the numbers of French troops was lower than previously believed.

Thatching Preserves Historic Grain Crops

An article in British Archaeology Magazine reports that medieval cereal crops have been discovered in thatched roofs in southern England.