English

Grendel: the Opera

Grendel, a new opera from Tony Award-winning director Julie Taymor, opened recently at the Lincoln Center Festival. Based on Beowulf but told from the monster's point of view, the opera is sung in Old English by the humans while Grendel sings in contemporary language.

Robin Hood's Castle Discovered?

Researchers excavating a site in Bolsterstone, England believe they may have found the home of Robin Hood. Experts base their claim on the belief that the mythical Robin Hood was based on the son of the Earl of Huntingdon.

Roman Road to Nowhere

Peddars Way near Thetford in west Norfolk, England, was built by the Romans 2,000 years ago and appears to lead nowhere. Archaeologists are now searching for clues to a destination, such as a fort, which would make construction of the road logical.

Ear Scoop Declared Treasure

A medieval silver grooming implement discovered earlier this year by a metal detectorist, has been declared treasure by the Hatfield Coroner's Court.

Known World Players announce performance of Wakefield Cycle for Pennsic 2007

Press Release: The Known World Players are proud to announce their most ambitious project to date for Pennsic 2007: a selection of ten to twelve plays from the Wakefield Cycle, to be performed on pageant wagons in authentic medieval style.

Record Price for 14th-century English Coin

One of only three known Edward III double florins went for UK£460,000 at Spink auction house. The coin has a face value of six shillings.

Seeking Shakespeare in Connecticut

An exhibition of three paintings depicting the likeness of William Shakespeare is on display at the Yale Center for British Art. Searching for Shakespeare will be in New Haven, CT until September 17, 2006.

The Plantagenets and Crecy

In an article in Primitive Archer Magazine, Gene Langston looks at the Battle of Crecy and the Plantagenet influence on historical archery.

Latin for Beginners

The British Archives has posted a tutorial for those who want to learn Latin. Latin 1086 – 1733: a practical online tutorial for beginners uses early documents to demonstrate how Latin was used and to teach the basics.

British outbred by Anglo-Saxon 'apartheid'

New genetic research suggests the Anglo-Saxons who conquered England in the fifth century spread their genes to the local population using a system of apartheid.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 15, 1573

English architect Inigo Jones was born on July 15, 573.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 13, 1527

John Dee, scholar, mystic, and astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, was born on July 13, 1527.

Dorset Kitchen Renovation Unearths Roman Floor

Restaurant owner Luciano Tombolani discovered much more than he bargained for when he authorized the renovation of a kitchen for his Italian restaurant: a mosaic Roman floor.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 12, 1174

King Henry II of England performed penance for the murder of Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral on July 12, 1174.

Medieval Code Ring Brings Wealth and Glory to Metal Detector

Metal detector enthusiast John Wood certainly didn't expect to strike it rich four years ago when he discovered an odd-looking gold ring, but the 650-year-old artifact is now set to sell at Christies for UK£100,000.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 10, 1376

The "Good Parliament" ended in London on July 10, 1376. It was nicknamed by the people of England in recognition of its efforts to end corruption at court.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 9, 1386

John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, ancestor of English kings, sailed for Spain on July 9, 1386.

Medieval Monks, Workers to be Reburied

The bodies of 44 medieval monks and workers discovered during the contruction of an overpass in Partney, England, were reburied in mid-June.

14th Century Manor to Reopen

A 14th Century hall in on the banks of the River Welland in Lincolnshire that was restored with a UK£600,000 lottery grant is reopening as an art gallery and museum. It will contain 10 galleries, including the history of the local fens and how the landscape was created by drainage and reclamation.

250,000 year-old handaxes found in Britain

Near Cuxton in Kent, archaeologists have found stone axes more than a quarter million years old and bearing craftsmanship exceeding the quality of that previously found from such an early time period.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 30, 1451

The French captured the city of Bordeaux on June 30, 1451.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 29, 1613

The original Globe Theatre was destroyed by fire on June 29, 1613.

Bamburg Sword Unlike Any Other in the World

Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have declared a 7th century sword, discovered at Bamburgh Castle in 1960, unique in the world.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 25, 1291

Eleanor of Provence, widow of King Henry III of England, died on June 25, 1291. She was one of four sisters who all became queens.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 24, 1441

King Henry VI of England founded Eton College on June 24, 1441.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 22, 1400

On June 22, 1400, Owain Glyndwr and his allies defeated in the English in the Battle of Bryn Glas.

"Shakespeare Book of Lists"

Author, teacher and consultant for the Folger Shakespeare Library, Michael LoMonico, has posted an online companion to his book, The Shakespeare Book of Lists which looks at the playwright's life, work and times through a collection of lists.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 20, 1367

On June 20, 1367, King Edward III of England awarded Geoffrey Chaucer an annual pension and the position of valet at court.

Rare Exmoor ponies to help save dwindling peat bog

Ponies from an endangered breed, descended from the original British "hill ponies," are being brought into a nature preserve on the Solway Plain in England, to graze away grasses that threaten one of the area's few remaining peat bogs.

British archaeologists find the King's Table

The Australian reports that sections of the King's Table, an elaborately-carved stone table used for English coronation feasts and state banquets as far back as the 13th century, have been found under the floor of the Palace of Westminster.