English

Lafayette Public Library to Offer Chaucer Program

The Lafayette Public Library in Lafayette, Louisiana will present "The Life and Times of Geoffrey Chaucer," a free teacher workshop, on November 11, 2006.

Hans Holbein at the V&A

Artist Hans Holbein, best known for his portraits of royal personages of the Tudor court, is the subject of a new exhibit at London's Victoria and Albert Museum. The large collection of paintings will be on display 28 September 2006 through 7 January 2007.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 14, 1066

The Battle of Hastings was fought on October 14, 1066 between William the Bastard's Norman forces and the Saxon defenders under King Harold II. It changed forever the culture and language of the British Isles.

"Hound of Hartlepool" Baffles Experts

The 600-year-old bronze silhouette of a snarling dog has stumped experts who are trying to puzzle out its use. Weathervane? "Beware of Dog" sign? They aren't sure what to make of the crudely cut image, unearthed by Tees Archaeology.

BBC offers live webcast of Hastings 2006

On October 14 and 15, the annual Battle of Hastings reenactment will be webcast live by the BBC. The reenactment of the famous 1066 battle between King Harold the Saxon and William the Norman takes place on the very site of the original event, which gave William the Conqueror his nickname.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 7, 1543

Hans Holbein the Younger, the northern Renaissance portraitist who painted many Tudor notables including Henry VIII and at least two of his wives, died on October 7, 1543.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 6, 1536

William Tyndale, Bible translator and Protestant scholar, was executed for heresy on October 6, 1536. He was condemned to burn at the stake, but was mercifully strangled first and his body burned after death.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 4, 1568

Elisabeth de Valois, third of the four wives of Philip II of Spain, died on October 4, 1568. She had originally been betrothed to his son but married the father as part of a peace settlement.

Renaissance and Early Modern Festival Books Now Online

View 253 digitised Renaissance festival books (selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection) that describe the magnificent festivals and ceremonies that took place in Europe between 1475 and 1700.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 3, 1470

The readeption of previously deposed King Henry VI of England occurred on October 3, 1470. The mentally ill king had to be led by the hand during the celebratory parade.

Brits are All Celts Under the Skin

According to a recent study of the genetic makeup of Britain's population, nearly all residents are descended from the Celts. "If one thinks that the English are genetically different from the Scots, Irish and Welsh, that's entirely wrong," said Professor Bryan Sykes, a human geneticist at Oxford University.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 30, 1139

Matilda, also called Maud, the daughter of Henry I, landed in England to claim its crown on September 30, 1139. She was the first woman ever to rule the kingdom of England.

Early Stuart needlework exhibit at the Fitzwilliam

"Figures on Fabric" will be on display at the Octagon Gallery of the Fitzwilliam Museum (at the University of Cambridge, in England) through December 30.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 26, 1087

On September 26, 1087, William II of England, known as William Rufus, was crowned king. He succeeded his father, William the Conqueror.

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Roman Ink

An unlikely exhibition exploring the history of tattoos in Britain has opened at Newcastle University's Museum of Antiquities. The exhibition includes archaeological evidence of military tattoos among the Roman soldiers at Hadrian's Wall.

Skeletons Tell Bloody Story

Skeletons bearing evidence of terrible injuries have been discovered beneath the floor of a dining hall in the North Yorkshire town of Towton, site of the longest and bloodiest battle ever fought in England.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 3, 1189

Richard I of England, called the Lion Heart, was crowned king in Westminster on September 3, 1189. The crusading king never learned to speak English and spent all but six months of his reign abroad.

Medieval Law Saddles Queen with Rat-Infested House

Residents of Manchester, England have declared Her Majesty owner of of an abandoned and vandalized house thanks to a 607-year-old law that turns over ownership of abandoned buildings to the Crown.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 31, 1057

Leofric, Earl of Mercia and the husband of Lady Godiva, died on August 31, 1057.

Round Table Building Discovered at Windsor Castle

Channel 4's Time Team may have discovered evidence of the existence of the original round table at Windsor Castle. The team has found some evidence of a round structure built by Edward III constructed to house the table and the original 300 Knights of the Garter.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 29, 1475

Edward IV of England invaded France on August 29, 1475, a few years after eliminating Lancastrian resistance at the Battle of Tewkesbury.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 27, 1172

Marguerite, wife of Henry Plantagenet "the Young King", was crowned Queen of England on August 27, 1172, two years after her husband was crowned during his father Henry II's lifetime.

Possible Benedictine Guesthouse Found Under Pub

Archaeologists believe they have unearthed a medieval Benedictine hostelry beneath a pub near Byland Abbey near Coxwold.

Time Team Dig Up Queen's Gardens Searching For Tennis Court of Mary, Queen of Scots

TV time travellers, Channel 4's Time Team have been given permission to dig in the gardens of Buckingham Palace to search for the tennis court and bathhouse of Mary, Queen of Scots, at Holyrood and the foundations of Edward III's banqueting hall at Windsor Castle.

Unique Tudor Water Tower Discovered

A structure, previously thought to be a folly or hawking platform, is now believed to be a unique Tudor water tower.

Records Document Challenge Between British Monarch and Pretender

New records released by the British National Archive show that Anthony Hall, who claimed to be a descendent of Henry VIII in the early 20th century, deserved to be declared insane for threatening to lop off the head of King George V.

Saxon and Norman Artifacts Found in Southampton Dig

Excavation of a future construction site in Southampton, UK produced artifacts from the eleventh, fourteenth and twentieth centuries.

Obscure Medieval Law Frustrates Britons

A law dating back to the Middle Ages is causing mayhem in the British real estate market.

England's Doomsday Book Online

The British National Archives has an entire section of their website devoted to the Doomsday Book including downloadable images.