English

Today in the Middle Ages: April 22, 1348

The legendary dropped-underwear incident that led to the founding of England's highest order of knighthood is said to have happened on April 22, 1348.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 21, 1509

Henry VII of England, the Tudor victor in the Wars of the Roses, died on April 21, 1509.

Shakespeare First Folio to be Auctioned

A rare, 17th century, calf-bound volume of the plays of William Shakespeare is scheduled to be auctioned in the summer of 2006 at Sotheby's sale of English Literature and History.

The Winchester Pilgrimage

The Shire of West Dragoningshire will sponsor a period pilgrimage in Winchester, England May 12-15, 2006.

York Claims Emperor Constantine

More than a statue salutes the Roman Emperor Constantine in York, England. A major exhibit of treasures, including a sculpted marble head of the emperor, will be on display in the city until October 2006.

Saxon Village Excites Archaeologists

The discovery of the remains of a village dating from the late Saxon period in Southampton, England has researchers from Oxford Archaeology a buzz. Among the finds were glassware from Italy and Germany.

Iron Age Roundhouse Discovered in West Yorkshire

The remains of a 2,000-year-old Dotterill roundhouse were discovered recently by workers excavating for a village bypass. The site is near Bridlington, England.

Largest Medieval Parish Cemetery Outside London Excavated

Members of the University of Leicester archaeology unit are excavating a large parish cemetery containing over 1,300 skeletons that date from between 1200 and 1600 CE.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 14, 1471

The Battle of Barnet, fought on April 14, 1471 near London, was a major victory for the Yorkist Edward IV in the English Wars of the Roses.

15th Century Trading Hall Re-opened in Norwich

Dragon Hall, a 15th Century trading hall has been re-opened in Norwich after a UK₤2 million restoration.

Harry Potter, King Edward, and the SCA converge for a grand feast

What do Harry Potter, King Edward of England, and the Middle Kingdom all have in common? Elements of all three came together recently at Oxford, England, for a most exquisite feast.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 11, 1554

Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger was executed on April 11, 1554, for leading a rebellion against Queen Mary Tudor of England, known to history as "Bloody Mary."

Today in the Middle Ages: April 10, 1512

King James V of Scotland was born on April 10, 1512. He was the son of James IV of Scotland and Margaret Tudor, the sister of King Henry VIII.

Mapping 14th Century Britain

Mapping the Realm: English Catrographic Constructions of Fourteenth-Century Britain is an interactive online version of England's Gough Map.

Identity of Jamestown Skeleton Still Unknown

Extensive DNA testing has yet to reveal the identity of a skeleton found in the Jamestown, Virginia excavations. Researchers now doubt that the remains belong to Captain Bartholomew Gosnold.

Headless Bodies in York Cemetery Gladiators?

Researchers have suggested that the remains discovered in a Roman cemetery in York, England might be those of gladiators. The bodies were all of tall, strong men, and all were headless.

New Henry I Charter Discovered

Historians working at Berkeley Castle in Gloucestershire have discovered a charter, from the reign of Henry I, granting a manor to St Peter's Abbey.

Winchester Pilgrimage

description:
The Shire of West Dragoningshire invites all lords, barons, knights, squires, along with their ladies and all other gentles of any station to join them in the Winchester Pilgrimage, 12-14 May 2006.

Nestled in the water meadows alongside the River Itchen, in the shadow of St Catherine's Hill and only 20 minutes walk from the centre of Winchester, lies the medieval buildings of the Hospital of St Cross & Almshouse of Noble Poverty. Location:
Shire of West Dragoningshire (Winchester, England)

Medieval English Year Books Online

Boston University's School of Law has produced a searchable database for the English Year Books which are the law reports for the country from the 13th through 16th centuries.

Huge Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Britain

The discovery of 600 copper, Roman coins has British archaeologists buzzing. The hoard, found in Suffolk, England, is thought to be the largest stash of legitimately-minted coins ever found in the country.

The Secret History of Nursery Rhymes

A British website looks at the origins and original lyrics of famous nursery rhymes including Ring a Ring o Rosies long believed to refer to the Black Death and Remember Remember, which chronicles Guy Fawkes' attempt to blow up Parliament.

Romano-British Good Luck Charm Found

Archaeologists working near Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland, England, have discovered a stone carving of what is believed to be the god Cocidius, a Romano-British warrior god, used for protection and good luck.

Cate Blanchett back as Elizabeth in "The Golden Age"

Cate Blanchett is to reprise her role as Elizabeth I, in a new movie called The Golden Age. It is set 15 years after the last movie and will touch on her relationship with Mary, Queen of Scots and end just before the battle with the Spanish Armada.

Medievale Fortified Bridge Linking Wales and England Discovered at Shrewsbury

A medieval bridge that was once an entry point into England from Wales has been unearthed at Shrewsbury.

Shakespearean Insult Generator

Thou villainous doghearted gudgeon! Chris Seidel has created an insult generator based on the original Shakespeare Insult Kit. Have fun!

Hartlepool Excavations Give Insight into Medieval Life

Construction crews working on a project to create a new town square in Hartlepool, England were surprised to unearth the remains of a medieval town complete with "medieval properties, pots and relics of iron smelting."

Blood of the Vikings

On March 18, 2006, the Science Channel will broadcast The Blood of the Vikings, a cultural look at the Viking lifestyle along the northeast coast of England.

Mysterious Lady of the Wells

A fifteenth century mural of a flimsily-clad woman discovered beneath the floor of Virgin's Tower of the residence of the Bishop of Bath and Wells has sparked a great deal of interest among researchers who wonder about the meaning of the painting.

Finding the Lost Village of Le Penne

Arcaheologists working on a dig on the Isle of Wight are hoping that Le Penne, a lost medieval village, will emerge from under the Great Pan Farm.

Experts Gather to Save Cathedral's Historic Carvings

Conservation experts are drawing up plans to preserve medieval works of art at a Yorkshire cathedral and display them to a global audience.