English

The Deposition of Sir John Sully, Iddesleigh, 1386

14th century English knight Sir John Sully was buried in the Church of the Holy Cross in Exeter, England after dying at the advanced age of 106. His great age is documented in part by a deposition in which he discusses his long military career and some of the battles in which he participated. The website includes a transcript of the deposition.

Royal Saxon descendents wanted

English Heritage is looking for descendants of Harold Godwinson, the last Saxon king of England, to take part in an exhibit at the visitors center at the Hastings Battlefield.

Illuminated manuscripts from time of Edward IV

Among the manuscripts digitized and included in the collection of the Free Library of Philadelphia, are a set depicting the Genealogy of Edward IV.

Blue Lady Tavern chronicles life in an 8th century Saxon town

Leofwen Taverner of Eoforwic, modernly known as Nan Hawthorne, is an historical novelist and member of Regia Anglorum who writes a wonderful and detailed diary of her persona, presented to our modern eye as a blog.

Blue Lady Tavern

Leofwen Taverner of Eoforwic, modernly known as Nan Hawthorne, is an historical novelist who writes a wonderful and detailed diary of her persona, presented to our modern eye as a blog. Installments talk about the daily goings-on, from the pedestrian to the sublime, in an 8th century CE town in Saxon England.

New Medieval Views of Stonehenge

This new view of Stonehenge is a tiny Medieval drawing in the "scala mundi" or "world ladder" on a chart which chronicles Creation. While not the oldest image of Stonehenge, it one of only a few known to exist.

13th century treasures found in Berwick dig

Archaeologists working at a dig in the Walkergate area of Berwick, England have uncovered a number of artifacts dating to the "heyday of Berwick," including a silver coin from the reign of Henry III.

Shakespeare's Church Has Leaky Roof

The caretakers of the church where William Shakespeare was baptized and buried want help to fix its leaky roof. Holy Trinity Church in Stratford upon Avon is seeking sponsors to "adopt a gargoyle" and help the church provide the extensive maintenance needed.

Anglo-Saxon Finds in East Sussex Church

Renovations on St Andrew's Church, at Bishopstone, near Seaford, have revealed Anglo-Saxon features dated back as far as the late 7th Century. This puts the age of the church back 100 years compared to previous datings.

Are you royal?

Advertisements in newspapers throughout England, Australia, the United States and Europe are asking the question: "Can you trace your family tree back to 1066? Might your ancestors have claimed the English throne?"

Science proves Shakespeare good for the brain

Medical research by University of Liverpool scientists has proved that reading Shakespeare can increase brain activity. Science Daily has the story.

Canterbury Cathedral in crisis

England's Canterbury Cathedral has launched an international fundraising campaign in a effort to raise more than UK£50m necessary for urgent repairs.

Treasures from Kremlin Armoury Museum on display in London

Britannia & Muscovy: English Silver at the Court of the Tsars, an exhibit of rare Elizabethan and Stuart silver and gold from the collections of the Kremlin Armoury Museum, will be featured at London's Gilbert Collection until January 28, 2007.

British history timeline

The website timeref.com is designed to help understand the Middle Ages in Britain (800-1499 C.E.) by way of a timeline, maps and links to related subjects.

Jorvik Viking Festival set for February 2007

Travelers to the north of England may want to mark their calendars for February 14-18, 2007 when the Jorvik Viking Festival takes place in York.

Historic images from above

Now through February 2007, the British Museum presents The Past from Above, an exhibition of aerial photos of archaeological and heritage sites taken by Swiss photographer Georg Gerster.

Seahenge not ready for display until 2008

Seahenge, a 4000-year-old wooden circle which appeared on a beach near Holme, England in 1998, will not be available to be viewed by the public until 2008, according to curators at the Lynn Museum where the artifact is being restored.

Tower of London hires first female Beefeater

For the first time in its 522 year history, the Tower of London will enlist a female Beefeater. The name of the new Yeoman Warder has not been made public, but she was chosen from a group of six applicants, five men and one woman, as the "best candidate for the job."

Chau Daddy!

Hip hop artist Baba Brinkman has found inspiration for his music in an unusual place: the works of 14th century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer.

Singing sheep send seasonable sentiments

The Baarmy Sheep of the Lake District in Cumbria, England have garnered so many hits on the Cumbria Tourism's website with last year's Christmas songs that the organization was forced to offer a free download.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 24, 1166

The future King John of England was born on Christmas Eve 1166 C.E. in Oxford, England to Eleanor of Aquitaine and King Henry II. One wonders what his mother thought of her Christmas bundle.

New translation of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" on BBC Radio 4

Unable to view the original manuscript of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in the British Library, Simon Armitage decided to make his own translation. In an article for the Guardian, Armitage discusses the work and provides an excerpt.

England's First Printed Page

A photography of an indulgence printed by William Caxton in 1476 is available to view on the website of the UK National Archives. The page was the first printed in England.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre Still Under Debate

Representatives from local government and English Heritage are meeting for a two-week public inquiry on the fate of the proposed visitor centre for Stonehenge. The controversial centre would be built two miles from the monument.

Surname Profiler Project

University College London has created an online project to share research on the distribution of surnames throughout Great Britain. The project traces the history of family names as well as their geography.

Four Frightened to Death by Fairies in Lamplugh

Life in 17th century England was dangerous, if the death records from the town of Lamplugh can be believed. Causes of death listed ranged from "Sleep coughing" to "Broke his neck robbing a hen roost" to "Frighted to Death by faries." Sarah Getty of the London Metro has the story.

Prince Charles Shares Royal Recipes

Britain's Prince Charles shares family recipes dating back to the time of Henry VIII in a new cookbook. The Duchy Originals Cookbook will feature such delicacies as "Maids of Honour Tarts," said to have been given to Anne Boleyn by the King.

"Catherine Called Birdy" Teaches About Medieval Life

Paula Laurita, Library Sciences Editor for BellaOnline, has created a website to help librarians and educators teach children learn about the Middle Ages.

Burial Site Discovery Pushes Back Date of Christianity in Britain

A Christian grave discovered near St-Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London, indicates that Christianity may have come to Albion much earlier than previously supposed.

Curse Tablet Expands Knowledge of Roman Britain

Archaelogists from the University of Leicester have found a fragment of lead that greatly adds to their knowledge of the city's Roman past. The "curse tablet" bears a list of 18 names; until now, only a few names of Roman residents of the city were known.