Cutty Sark Burns

For those who love sailing ships, the famous British ship and "world's last surviving tea clipper," Cutty Sark, has been burned in what police are calling a "suspicious" circumstance.

Exhibit of 16th & 17th century art celebrates 400th anniversary of Jamestown

"Rule Britannia: Art, Royalty, & Power in the Age of Jamestown" -- featuring the "Armada" portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, never before been exhibited in the U.S. -- will be on display at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, through August 12.

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe, is a nonfiction history book set in 13th-century medieval Europe and follows the story of the four daughters of Count Raymond Berenger V and Beatrice of Savoy.

Archaeologist to speak on La Grava manorial and monastic excavation

On May 9, 2007, Evelyn Baker, former manager of the Bedfordshire County Archaeological Survey, presents "La Grava: Bedfordshire's Best Kept Secret," about the 13-year project described as "the most important and extensive manorial and monastic excavation of the 20th century."

Bards in Space: Video Game to Teach Kids About Shakespeare

This just in! The Bard is going into space! Yes, that's right, folks, it's the showdown of the millennium...William Shakespeare vs. Alien.

You are there: Eyewitness at Sutton Hoo

In an article published by The Telegraph, John Preston relates the story of how his archaeologist aunt unearthed the Anglo Saxon gold at Sutton Hoo in the 1930s.

Battle of Hastings re-enactors duke it out on video

British television personality Dan Snow provides several short videos pertaining to English Heritage sites online. The films include a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings.

England and Norway settle currency negotiation medieval-style

Parody web site The Onion reports that, weary of sitting in business suits around a conference table, Prince William of England met and bested Prince Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands in honourable jousting combat.

Viking Longhouse Reconstruction Vandalized

Vandals in Britain attacked and damaged a reconstructed Viking longhouse used by schoolchildren to study medieval culture.

"Breathtaking" falconry demonstration at Battle Abbey

Reporters for the Hastings & St. Leonards Observer promise "breathtaking demonstrations of early Medieval falconry" on May 28, 2007 at England's Battle Abbey.

Britain's forgotten battlefields

In an essay for Britain's Independent, Ian Herbert considers some of the country's forgotten battlefields and how historians should fight for their protection.

Metal detector finds 7th century Saxon pendant

Stacey Spiby, a metal detector enthusiast from Shepshed, England, has found a rare 7th century Anglo Saxon oval pendant worth “in the region of a few thousand pounds.”

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Portraits of Henry VIII

The current fascination with the English Tudors in the media has led many to look for portraits of the family online. One site of interest is Tudor England Images, which includes a long chronological list of portraits of Henry VIII.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Mapping the Middle Ages

Keith Lilley, Chris Lloyd and Steve Trick of Queen's University Belfast have provided a digital resource for maps of villages and townships in the Middle Ages.

Medieval windmill found in Burwell

An unused plot of ground near Burwell, England, which was being tested for possible development, has revealed the remains of a medieval windmill dating as far back as the 13th century.

St. Clare Friary remains to be analyzed

Researchers will soon begin analysis of remains from 30 medieval graves discovered in February, 2007 in Preston, England's city center, believed to have once been the site of a friary dedicated to St. Clare.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Bayeux Tapestry comes to life

avidavid62 has posted an animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry on YouTube where the paintings actually move. The film was created by David Newton.

Building Stonehenge

Ah... a misty morning at Stonehenge... Want to build your own? Wally Wallington can show you how in this fascinating video on YouTube.

Historical Novel Set During Reign of Henry II

Mistress of the Art of Death, a new novel by Ariana Franklin, has been released from Putnam. The story is set in 1171, during the reign of England's King Henry II, based around murders taking place in Cambridge.

Tudor revival

An article in the April 2, 2007 edition of Time Magazine takes a look at the renewed interest in Tudor England. "When Royals Become Rock Stars" by Rebecca Winters Keegan discusses the upcoming Showtime series The Tudors as well as movies depicting the lives of Elizabeth I and the Boleyn Sisters.

Piece of 14th Century Clock Found in York

Researchers in York have discovered a small copper-alloy disc dating back to around 1300 that was part of an early mechanical clock.

House Where Henry VIII Met Anne Boleyn for Sale

The manor house where England's King Henry VIII first met Anne Boleyn, an event which produced one of the greatest monarchs of history, Queen Elizabeth I, is for sale for UK£1.3 million.

Cornish language proposal online

UdnFormScrefys, a group of Cornish users, has created a proposal for a written form of the Cornish language. They hope to submit it soon to the Cornish Language Commission.

Medieval Abbey Undergoing Refurbishment

The medieval Torre Abbey in Torquay is undergoing the first phase of a UK£6.5 million refurbishment to turn it into an educational facility and tourist attraction.

14th century astrolabe brings record price

A rare 14th century astrolade quadrant has been auctioned off to an anonymous bidder for UK£138,000. The instrument was crafted of brass in 1388 and was used "for telling time, mapping the stars and taking measurements."

Hamlet on trial?

Was Hamlet guilty of stabbing Polonius behind the arras? A jury trial being conducted as part of the Shakespeare Festival in Washington D.C. will decide. Listen to the story from the March 16 edition of All Things Considered.

Ready, set go: starting gates from Colchester's Roman Circus found

Twelve starting gates from the Roman Circus at Colchester, England have been discovered by archaeologists who have been working on the site since 2004. The gates operated like "greyhound traps, unleashing the charioteers on to the quarter-mile long opening stretch of the track."