English

Britain's forgotten battlefields

In an essay for Britain's Independent, Ian Herbert considers some of the country's forgotten battlefields and how historians should fight for their protection.

Metal detector finds 7th century Saxon pendant

Stacey Spiby, a metal detector enthusiast from Shepshed, England, has found a rare 7th century Anglo Saxon oval pendant worth “in the region of a few thousand pounds.”

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Portraits of Henry VIII

The current fascination with the English Tudors in the media has led many to look for portraits of the family online. One site of interest is Tudor England Images, which includes a long chronological list of portraits of Henry VIII.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Mapping the Middle Ages

Keith Lilley, Chris Lloyd and Steve Trick of Queen's University Belfast have provided a digital resource for maps of villages and townships in the Middle Ages.

Medieval windmill found in Burwell

An unused plot of ground near Burwell, England, which was being tested for possible development, has revealed the remains of a medieval windmill dating as far back as the 13th century.

St. Clare Friary remains to be analyzed

Researchers will soon begin analysis of remains from 30 medieval graves discovered in February, 2007 in Preston, England's city center, believed to have once been the site of a friary dedicated to St. Clare.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Bayeux Tapestry comes to life

avidavid62 has posted an animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry on YouTube where the paintings actually move. The film was created by David Newton.

Building Stonehenge

Ah... a misty morning at Stonehenge... Want to build your own? Wally Wallington can show you how in this fascinating video on YouTube.

Historical Novel Set During Reign of Henry II

Mistress of the Art of Death, a new novel by Ariana Franklin, has been released from Putnam. The story is set in 1171, during the reign of England's King Henry II, based around murders taking place in Cambridge.

Tudor revival

An article in the April 2, 2007 edition of Time Magazine takes a look at the renewed interest in Tudor England. "When Royals Become Rock Stars" by Rebecca Winters Keegan discusses the upcoming Showtime series The Tudors as well as movies depicting the lives of Elizabeth I and the Boleyn Sisters.

Piece of 14th Century Clock Found in York

Researchers in York have discovered a small copper-alloy disc dating back to around 1300 that was part of an early mechanical clock.

House Where Henry VIII Met Anne Boleyn for Sale

The manor house where England's King Henry VIII first met Anne Boleyn, an event which produced one of the greatest monarchs of history, Queen Elizabeth I, is for sale for UK£1.3 million.

Cornish language proposal online

UdnFormScrefys, a group of Cornish users, has created a proposal for a written form of the Cornish language. They hope to submit it soon to the Cornish Language Commission.

Medieval Abbey Undergoing Refurbishment

The medieval Torre Abbey in Torquay is undergoing the first phase of a UK£6.5 million refurbishment to turn it into an educational facility and tourist attraction.

14th century astrolabe brings record price

A rare 14th century astrolade quadrant has been auctioned off to an anonymous bidder for UK£138,000. The instrument was crafted of brass in 1388 and was used "for telling time, mapping the stars and taking measurements."

Hamlet on trial?

Was Hamlet guilty of stabbing Polonius behind the arras? A jury trial being conducted as part of the Shakespeare Festival in Washington D.C. will decide. Listen to the story from the March 16 edition of All Things Considered.

Ready, set go: starting gates from Colchester's Roman Circus found

Twelve starting gates from the Roman Circus at Colchester, England have been discovered by archaeologists who have been working on the site since 2004. The gates operated like "greyhound traps, unleashing the charioteers on to the quarter-mile long opening stretch of the track."

"The Tudor Tailor" comes to Phoenix

Dennita Sewell, Curator of Fashion Design for the Phoenix Art Museum, has announced that Ninya Mikhaila and Jane Malcolm-Davies, authors of The Tudor Tailor, will present a program at the museum on June 5, 2007 at 6:00 p.m.

Roman village discovered in Wiltshire

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, England may contain more than a Neolithic mound. It may also be the site of a first century Roman village. "English Heritage geophysicist Dr Neil Linford said: 'We are really excited by this discovery because we had no idea that a Roman village of such a size lay this close to Silbury Hill.'"

1500-year-old Saxon burial promises more discoveries to come

Archaeologists working at a recreational site near Oakington, England have discovered a 1500-year-old Saxon burial. They believe there is also evidence of a settlement.

View of ancient Britons changed by discovery of Roman coin

The discovery of a 2nd century BCE coin in Cornwall may change how pre-Roman Britons are viewed. The pre-Roman Republic silver coin proves that active trading took place with the inhabitants of Britain before Rome conquered the island.

The Tudors come to Showtime

Jonathan Rhys-Meyers will star as the young Henry VIII in Showtime's new series The Tudors. The series begins Sunday April 1, 2007 at 20:00 (EST).

Lost Stonehenge altar stone found

Archaeologist Dennis Price believes he has located the lost altar stone from Stonehenge. First identified in the 17th century, the stone by architect Inigo Jones, the altar may now lie, in two sections, along a Wiltshire village road.

Nicholas Howe, Anglo-Saxon scholar, dies in Oakland, California

Nicholas Howe, one of the world's leading scholars of Anglo-Saxon studies, died of complications arising from leukemia September 27, 2006 in Oakland, California. R. M. Liuzza of the University of Tennessee has posted an obituary on the Old English Newsletter website.

"Unusual building features" found inside Bodiam Castle

Archaeologists are puzzled by the discovery of a wall and "circular feature" inside the Great Hall area of Bodiam Castle in East Sussex, England. The mysterious ruins might be part of an 18th Century gardener's cottage, or they might be part of the original medieval hall.

Coventry pub renovation reveals dark past

Renovations on the Four Provinces Pub in Coventry, England have unearthed human remains dating to the 12th century. The bones show evidence of leprosy.

Medieval priory found beneath Somerset barn

Researchers working on artifacts found beneath a 16th century barn near Dunster, England believe they belong to the Benedictine Priory of Dunster which dates to 1127 CE. Archaeologists have so far discovered two walls, paving and glazed tile fragments.