English

"Explore Roman Britain" Online

The University of Oxford (England) has announced that an online, continuing education program entitled Exploring Roman Britain is now accepting students.

Soper Lane

A group of women in London have joined together to study and re-create the working lives of their counterparts in the 15th century. Soper Lane, named after the silkweaving district in London, offers information on textiles, costuming and other activities.

Navigating 16th Century London

Dr. Janelle Jenstad of the University of Victoria in British Columbia has created an interactive map of 16th century London complete with the "theatres and landmarks of Shakespeare's time."

Lindisfarne Mead Finally to be Imported to the US

After 40 years, the owners of Lindisfarne Limited have secured permission to import their famous herb-infused Lindisfarne Mead to the United States. Permission to import was denied because of product labeling issues.

Jews in the Court of Tudor England?

Roger Prior, a Shakespearean scholar, is convinced that many of the musicians of the Tudor Court, including the Bard's own "Dark Lady," may have been Separdic Jews.

Battle of Hastings Video Online

Several video clips from the 2006 Battle of Hastings reenactment have been posted on the Living History website.

Letter From Catherine of Aragon for Sale

A letter from Catherine of Aragon pleading for help to preserve her marriage to England's King Henry VIII will be offered at auction in New York in December.

More Battle of Hastings Photos Online

Martin of Rivenstar recently attended the Battle of Hastings reenactment and shares photos taken by Lady Johanna.

Royal Archive Journals Online

The Journals of the Royal Society are now available to read online. The submissions date back to 1665 and include scientific works from Halley's description of his comet to the first paper published by Stephen Hawking.

Kent Gets Bronze Age Cup Back

A Bronze Age cup found in Kent by a metal detector enthusiast will return to the county on loan from the British Museum. The Ringlemere Gold Cup is one of only seven from the period found in Britain.

UNESCO Gives Warning on Tower of London Status

The United Nations cultural body UNESCO has warned that the Tower of London may be in danger of losing its World Heritage status, and has asked the United Kingdom to submit by 2007 a report on measures being taken to protect the Tower.

Battle of Hastings Photos Online

A small collection of really large photos from the recent Battle of Hastings reenactment are now available to view online.

Period Pewter Collection to be Auctioned

The pewter collection of the late Stanley Shemmell, including objects of Roman origin and vessels from the Spanish Armada, will go on sale at Bonham's auction house on October 26. The items in the collection represent over a thousand years in the history of pewter-making.

English Monastery Nominated for World Heritage Status

The Venerable Bede's monastic home has been put forward as a possible UNESCO World Heritage Site. If selected, it will gain that status in 2009.

Lafayette Public Library to Offer Chaucer Program

The Lafayette Public Library in Lafayette, Louisiana will present "The Life and Times of Geoffrey Chaucer," a free teacher workshop, on November 11, 2006.

Hans Holbein at the V&A

Artist Hans Holbein, best known for his portraits of royal personages of the Tudor court, is the subject of a new exhibit at London's Victoria and Albert Museum. The large collection of paintings will be on display 28 September 2006 through 7 January 2007.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 14, 1066

The Battle of Hastings was fought on October 14, 1066 between William the Bastard's Norman forces and the Saxon defenders under King Harold II. It changed forever the culture and language of the British Isles.

"Hound of Hartlepool" Baffles Experts

The 600-year-old bronze silhouette of a snarling dog has stumped experts who are trying to puzzle out its use. Weathervane? "Beware of Dog" sign? They aren't sure what to make of the crudely cut image, unearthed by Tees Archaeology.

BBC offers live webcast of Hastings 2006

On October 14 and 15, the annual Battle of Hastings reenactment will be webcast live by the BBC. The reenactment of the famous 1066 battle between King Harold the Saxon and William the Norman takes place on the very site of the original event, which gave William the Conqueror his nickname.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 7, 1543

Hans Holbein the Younger, the northern Renaissance portraitist who painted many Tudor notables including Henry VIII and at least two of his wives, died on October 7, 1543.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 6, 1536

William Tyndale, Bible translator and Protestant scholar, was executed for heresy on October 6, 1536. He was condemned to burn at the stake, but was mercifully strangled first and his body burned after death.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 4, 1568

Elisabeth de Valois, third of the four wives of Philip II of Spain, died on October 4, 1568. She had originally been betrothed to his son but married the father as part of a peace settlement.

Renaissance and Early Modern Festival Books Now Online

View 253 digitised Renaissance festival books (selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection) that describe the magnificent festivals and ceremonies that took place in Europe between 1475 and 1700.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 3, 1470

The readeption of previously deposed King Henry VI of England occurred on October 3, 1470. The mentally ill king had to be led by the hand during the celebratory parade.

Brits are All Celts Under the Skin

According to a recent study of the genetic makeup of Britain's population, nearly all residents are descended from the Celts. "If one thinks that the English are genetically different from the Scots, Irish and Welsh, that's entirely wrong," said Professor Bryan Sykes, a human geneticist at Oxford University.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 30, 1139

Matilda, also called Maud, the daughter of Henry I, landed in England to claim its crown on September 30, 1139. She was the first woman ever to rule the kingdom of England.

Early Stuart needlework exhibit at the Fitzwilliam

"Figures on Fabric" will be on display at the Octagon Gallery of the Fitzwilliam Museum (at the University of Cambridge, in England) through December 30.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 26, 1087

On September 26, 1087, William II of England, known as William Rufus, was crowned king. He succeeded his father, William the Conqueror.

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Roman Ink

An unlikely exhibition exploring the history of tattoos in Britain has opened at Newcastle University's Museum of Antiquities. The exhibition includes archaeological evidence of military tattoos among the Roman soldiers at Hadrian's Wall.