English

"Unusual building features" found inside Bodiam Castle

Archaeologists are puzzled by the discovery of a wall and "circular feature" inside the Great Hall area of Bodiam Castle in East Sussex, England. The mysterious ruins might be part of an 18th Century gardener's cottage, or they might be part of the original medieval hall.

Coventry pub renovation reveals dark past

Renovations on the Four Provinces Pub in Coventry, England have unearthed human remains dating to the 12th century. The bones show evidence of leprosy.

Medieval priory found beneath Somerset barn

Researchers working on artifacts found beneath a 16th century barn near Dunster, England believe they belong to the Benedictine Priory of Dunster which dates to 1127 CE. Archaeologists have so far discovered two walls, paving and glazed tile fragments.

Robin Hood to premiere on BBC America March 3, 2007

A new, edgier Robin Hood will join the ranks of hooded men when the latest series made for television debuts on BBC America March 3, 2007 at 21:00 (EST).

Roman burial ground a surprise for Lincolnshire archaeologists

Water company workers in Lincolnshire, England were surprised recently to uncover a very large Roman cemetery dating to the 1st century CE. So far the graves have yielded artifacts as well as 30 skeletons.

Stonehenge village archaeologist interviewed

Australia's ABC Radio National recently broadcast an interview with Mike Parker Pearson, one of the archaeologists who discovered the ancient settlement near Stonehenge. Stephanie Kennedy conducts the interview. (Transcript and podcast available)

Regia Anglorum demo on YouTube

Leofwen Taverner, a member of Regia Anglorum of North America, reports that a video of Regia Anglorum demo battle at the Jorvik Viking Festival in York, England is available on YouTube.

14th century astrolabe to be auctioned

A 14th century astrolabe quadrant, discovered beneath the clay floors of a 17th century building in Kent, England, has been listed for auction March 21, 2007 with hopes to bring between UK£60,000 and UK£100,000.

York grave holds Roman murder victim

Archaeologists working on a large Roman cemetery in York, England have discovered, among the remains of wealthy and poor alike, the bones of a murder victim. "She was stabbed seven times in the throat from the front," said Osteo-archaeologist Malin Holst.

York's Barley Hall holds pleasures

Genevieve la flechiere of the Kingdom of Drachenwald reports on a visit to Barley Hall, a 15th century merchant's house, in York, England.

1607 flood in Wales and England studied by scientists at Newport forum

One of the worst natural disasters to ever hit Great Britain occurred 400 years ago last month. On January 30, 1607, a storm flooded over 200 square miles of south Wales and southwest England. Now a risk management company is looking at the modern costs of recovery from such a storm.

Knitting at the V&A

London's Victoria and Albert Museum has revamped its webpage regarding the craft of knitting with links to its historic collection of knitted goods, patterns, children's patterns and booklists.

Globe Theatre: a new look

The producers of Reinventing the Globe: A Shakespearean Theater for the 21st Century, an exhibition at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., have turned over the famous building to the imaginations of five architects with the command to modernize the building.

Emperor Hadrian slept here!

Producers of the BBC's Timewatch program are hoping to prove that the Roman emperor Hadrian once stayed near his stone creation. This summer, archaeologists will dig along Hadrian's Wall looking for evidence of why the wall was built and where the Emperor might have stayed.

Electronic version of the Middle English Dictionary online

An electronic version of the Middle English Dictionary is available online. Hosted by the University of Michigan, the dictionary and quotations are searchable.

Village related to Stonehenge found

A major prehistoric village has been unearthed near Stonehenge in southern England. Stonehenge didn't stand alone, excavations show, recent excavations of Salisbury Plain in southern England have revealed at least two other large stone formations close by the world-famous prehistoric monument.

York flood may yield grisly discoveries

Officials from the York Dungeon Museum have warned residents who live near the River Ouse to be on the lookout for severed limbs and a skull which were lost during the recent flooding there. The realistic pros were part of an exhibit and were discovered missing during cleanup.

Stonehenge link to other ancient sites

Archaeologists Colin Richards of Manchester University and Joshua Pollard of Bristol University have a new theory on Stonehenge: it not isolated but stood as the link between a ritual burial mound and a timber circle.

The Deposition of Sir John Sully, Iddesleigh, 1386

14th century English knight Sir John Sully was buried in the Church of the Holy Cross in Exeter, England after dying at the advanced age of 106. His great age is documented in part by a deposition in which he discusses his long military career and some of the battles in which he participated. The website includes a transcript of the deposition.

Royal Saxon descendents wanted

English Heritage is looking for descendants of Harold Godwinson, the last Saxon king of England, to take part in an exhibit at the visitors center at the Hastings Battlefield.

Illuminated manuscripts from time of Edward IV

Among the manuscripts digitized and included in the collection of the Free Library of Philadelphia, are a set depicting the Genealogy of Edward IV.

Blue Lady Tavern chronicles life in an 8th century Saxon town

Leofwen Taverner of Eoforwic, modernly known as Nan Hawthorne, is an historical novelist and member of Regia Anglorum who writes a wonderful and detailed diary of her persona, presented to our modern eye as a blog.

Blue Lady Tavern

Leofwen Taverner of Eoforwic, modernly known as Nan Hawthorne, is an historical novelist who writes a wonderful and detailed diary of her persona, presented to our modern eye as a blog. Installments talk about the daily goings-on, from the pedestrian to the sublime, in an 8th century CE town in Saxon England.

New Medieval Views of Stonehenge

This new view of Stonehenge is a tiny Medieval drawing in the "scala mundi" or "world ladder" on a chart which chronicles Creation. While not the oldest image of Stonehenge, it one of only a few known to exist.

13th century treasures found in Berwick dig

Archaeologists working at a dig in the Walkergate area of Berwick, England have uncovered a number of artifacts dating to the "heyday of Berwick," including a silver coin from the reign of Henry III.

Shakespeare's Church Has Leaky Roof

The caretakers of the church where William Shakespeare was baptized and buried want help to fix its leaky roof. Holy Trinity Church in Stratford upon Avon is seeking sponsors to "adopt a gargoyle" and help the church provide the extensive maintenance needed.

Anglo-Saxon Finds in East Sussex Church

Renovations on St Andrew's Church, at Bishopstone, near Seaford, have revealed Anglo-Saxon features dated back as far as the late 7th Century. This puts the age of the church back 100 years compared to previous datings.

Are you royal?

Advertisements in newspapers throughout England, Australia, the United States and Europe are asking the question: "Can you trace your family tree back to 1066? Might your ancestors have claimed the English throne?"

Science proves Shakespeare good for the brain

Medical research by University of Liverpool scientists has proved that reading Shakespeare can increase brain activity. Science Daily has the story.

Canterbury Cathedral in crisis

England's Canterbury Cathedral has launched an international fundraising campaign in a effort to raise more than UK£50m necessary for urgent repairs.