English

Alfred The Great exhibit opens at the Winchester Discovery Centre

The Gallery, Winchester Discovery Centre presents Alfred the Great: Warfare, Wealth + Wisdom 2 February - 27 April 2008.

Medieval documents help locate Roman fort

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort near Calstock in Cornwall credit references to silver smelting in medieval documents for helping to locate the site.

Lizapalooza! A weekend of Learning with Drea Leed

description:
CostumeTalk.com is pleased to welcome Drea Leed, independent scholar and owner of the most extensive Elizabethan and Tudor costuming reference on the Web, The Elizabethan Costume Page (www.elizabethancostume.net), as our speaker in April 2008.Two full days of lectures, capped off with two hands-on limited attendance workshops!

Ms. Leed has studied Renaissance clothing and textiles for over ten years. She’s presented papers at the International Congress of Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo and the Medieval Congress at Leeds, England. Ms. Leed has given several talks and seminars on the topic of Renaissance and Elizabethan dress for various groups, and taught a six-week class on Elizabethan Dress at the CostumeClassroom.com. Location:
Eugene, Oregon

Road-tripping with Henry VIII

The Snickers road trip guys are at it again - this time with Henry VIII - munching away on a Snickers bar accompanied by "Greensleeves." Watch the video on YouTube.

Dives to Suffolk's sunken city may reveal medieval village

England's lost city of Dunwich has become a region of interest for underwater archaeologists who want to explore the medieval city. Britain's "Atlantis" was lost due to coastal erosion and rediscovered in the 1970's.

"Tudor Kitchens of Hampton Court Palace" at Greenbank Mills

On March 8, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. (US Eastern time) Marc Meltonville and Richard Fitch will present "The Tudor Kitchens of Hampton Court Palace" at Greenbank Mills & Philips Farm in Wilmington, Delaware.

Black Plague selective killer

A new study of nearly 500 skeletons in a London plague cemetery proves that many of the victims had weaker immune systems when they died than normal, leading experts to believe that most who succumbed were old, sick or poor.

Elis Gruffudd's chronicle of England and Wales online

The National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth has created a digitized version of Elis Gruffudd's 16th century chronicle on the history of England and Wales. The document covers 1066 through 1552.

British farmer hides mock castle from authorities

Apparently to avoid building inspections and zoning laws, Robert Fidler, a farmer in Surrey, England, built and lived in a complete mock-Tudor house and concealed the structure behind hay bales.

To punt or not to punt...

Only on NPR could the Bard, in the guise of Morning Edition's Frank Deford, comment on the upcoming Super Bowl football game.

The sound of medieval English

The BBC's British History website includes the Ages of English Timeline which allows visitors to hear English the way it would have been spoken throughout the various historical periods.

Showtime's "The Tudors" returns March 30, 2008

Showtime's hit TV series The Tudors, which follows the lives and escapades of King Henry VIII's court, returns for its second season March 30, 2008.

Saxon cemetery offers grisly findings

In-depth examination of a Saxon cemetery in East Yorkshire has given archaeologists some insight into the society's system of justice with the study of a dozen decapitated skeletons.

Oxford study: England's Later Medieval Queens

A course being taught at Oxford University, through the Berkeley Extension program, covers the history and role of England's later medieval queens from Eleanor of Aquitaine to Elizabeth Woodville.

Maryland man claims kingship of Isle of Man

David Howe of Frederick, Maryland was recently crowned king of the Isle of Man, a fact that might be surprising to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II of England. Howe, who became King David of Mann in March, 2007, has filed a claim for the island with the British government.

Households in early modern London

The website People in Place "introduces the methods and findings of a research project focused on family and household in London in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, a period of great social and economic transformation."

"Mysterious black substance" found in West Stow pits

Archaeologists working at an Anglo Saxon village in West Stow, near Bury St Edmunds, England have discovered the remains of three 6th century pits. The pits contained a "mysterious black substance."

Whaplode Medieval Fair wins grant

WHEAT, the Whaplode (England) Heritage and Educational Action Team, is delighted to have received a grant for UK£10,000 from the Awards for All Lottery organization. The grant will help fund a fair marking the anniversary of Edward I's Royal Charter granting the village a fair.

Bronze Sword Festival in Great Britain

Join bronze sword enthusiasts from all over the world for a 4-day event in celebration of sword-making when the 2008 Sword Festival takes place September 5-9, 2008 in Bodmin moor, England.

Party like it's 1575!

More than 400 years ago, Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester, threw the party of parties, a three-week long bash at Kenilworth Castle for Elizabeth I.

Cardinal Wolsey's blog

Cardinal Wolsey, Humble Servant of King Henry, shares his "musings on Tudor history, medieval history, early-modern history and anything else that takes his fancy" on his blog.

Sale of Samurai swords banned in Great Britain

"In the wrong hands, samurai swords are dangerous weapons," Home Office Minister Vernon Coaker said recently on the announcement by the British government that it would ban the sale of the swords.

Campaign to save cave from damage

The Royston Cave, a man-made cave that dates to the 13th century, is under threat from truck traffic on the road above the cave.

Magna Carta sale brings more than US$21.3 million

An early copy of the Magna Carta, sold recently at auction, has brought over US$21 million. The documents was purchased by David Rubinstein, a founder of the Carlyle Group.

A Wodwo in Camelot

According to reviewer Edward Hirsch, a Wodwo is a "raw, spooky, elemental," a Middle English word meaning “half-man, half-animal spirit of the forests” which appeared in “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Hirsch reviews a new translation by Simon Armitage.

Camelot Project offers Arthurian research sources

The Camelot Project at the University of Rochester is an online research source which includes searchable texts for images, texts, bibliographies and basic information on King Arthur.

Important English historic site may be sold for preservation reasons

When members of the Northamptonshire County Council bought Chester Farm near Irchester several years ago, they never dreamed they might need to put the historic site up for sale to keep it from falling into disrepair, but now that may be necessary.

Feasting with Chaucer

Just in time for the holidays, Darla Goodroad reports on feasting in the time of Chaucer in an article for Chivalry Sports: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry: Holiday feasting in Chaucer's Time.

London Olympic construction uncovers Roman artifacts

The London Olympics may leave a lasting mark on the city's history. Recently, workers at the site of the new London stadium unearthed artifacts including a Roman coin dating to the 4th century.

Richard III deconstructed

British actor Sir Ian McKellen delves into Shakespeare's Richard III's most famous speech in a video clip on the Stagework website.