English

Whaplode Medieval Fair wins grant

WHEAT, the Whaplode (England) Heritage and Educational Action Team, is delighted to have received a grant for UK£10,000 from the Awards for All Lottery organization. The grant will help fund a fair marking the anniversary of Edward I's Royal Charter granting the village a fair.

Bronze Sword Festival in Great Britain

Join bronze sword enthusiasts from all over the world for a 4-day event in celebration of sword-making when the 2008 Sword Festival takes place September 5-9, 2008 in Bodmin moor, England.

Party like it's 1575!

More than 400 years ago, Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester, threw the party of parties, a three-week long bash at Kenilworth Castle for Elizabeth I.

Cardinal Wolsey's blog

Cardinal Wolsey, Humble Servant of King Henry, shares his "musings on Tudor history, medieval history, early-modern history and anything else that takes his fancy" on his blog.

Sale of Samurai swords banned in Great Britain

"In the wrong hands, samurai swords are dangerous weapons," Home Office Minister Vernon Coaker said recently on the announcement by the British government that it would ban the sale of the swords.

Campaign to save cave from damage

The Royston Cave, a man-made cave that dates to the 13th century, is under threat from truck traffic on the road above the cave.

Magna Carta sale brings more than US$21.3 million

An early copy of the Magna Carta, sold recently at auction, has brought over US$21 million. The documents was purchased by David Rubinstein, a founder of the Carlyle Group.

A Wodwo in Camelot

According to reviewer Edward Hirsch, a Wodwo is a "raw, spooky, elemental," a Middle English word meaning “half-man, half-animal spirit of the forests” which appeared in “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Hirsch reviews a new translation by Simon Armitage.

Camelot Project offers Arthurian research sources

The Camelot Project at the University of Rochester is an online research source which includes searchable texts for images, texts, bibliographies and basic information on King Arthur.

Important English historic site may be sold for preservation reasons

When members of the Northamptonshire County Council bought Chester Farm near Irchester several years ago, they never dreamed they might need to put the historic site up for sale to keep it from falling into disrepair, but now that may be necessary.

Feasting with Chaucer

Just in time for the holidays, Darla Goodroad reports on feasting in the time of Chaucer in an article for Chivalry Sports: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry: Holiday feasting in Chaucer's Time.

London Olympic construction uncovers Roman artifacts

The London Olympics may leave a lasting mark on the city's history. Recently, workers at the site of the new London stadium unearthed artifacts including a Roman coin dating to the 4th century.

Richard III deconstructed

British actor Sir Ian McKellen delves into Shakespeare's Richard III's most famous speech in a video clip on the Stagework website.

Hamlet: the Text Adventure

Bored? Want to have a real literary adventure? Try Hamlet: the Text Adventure, a text-based mystery game.

Stonehenge tunnel plan scrapped

The fear that increased traffic might damage the historic site has led English Heritage to cancel a plan to build a tunnel under Stonehenge.

DNA and linguistic studies show Liverpool's Viking heritage

Researchers believe that the area around Liverpool, England was a Viking settlement. Their findings are based on original surnames and DNA evidence.

"Holy Blood and the Holy Grail" author dies at 64

Author Richard Leigh, best known as one of the co-authors of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, has died in London at the age of 64. The nonfiction work proposed that Jesus Christ fathered a child and that the bloodline continues.

Archaeologists search for abbott's grave at Hulton Abbey

A team of archaeologists from Keele University are using the latest geophysical equipment to search the grounds of Hulton Abbey in England hoping to find the graves of the monks who lived there as far back as the 13th century.

Anglo Saxon jewelry a "real find"

Archaeologists are delighted with the discovery of "the only known Anglo-Saxon royal burial site in the North of England" near Loftus on Teesside, where they found some incredible jewelry dating to the mid 7th century.

Touring Great Britain's cathedral towns

Planning to visit the UK over the holidays to drink in the historic atmosphere and sing a few carols? Harriet O'Brien offers The Complete Guide to Cathedral Cities in the UK.

The treasures of Richard II

A website chronicling the treasure roll of Richard II, compiled in the late 14th century, "offers a rare insight into the magnificence of a late medieval English king." The site includes photos of many of the treasures listed in the Roll.

An Introduction to Old English Language and Writing

Professor Edwin Duncan of Towson University has produced a nine-minute flash presentation on the reading and pronunciation of Old English.

Tapestry map shows Midlands of Shakespeare's time

A huge (4 feet x 6 feet, or 122 x 183 cm) 16th century tapestry map has returned to Oxford's Bodleian Library where it will be placed on display. The map was one of four such maps and was long thought to be lost. The Bodleian now owns three with the fourth in the Warwickshire Museum.

Britain's top ten stupid laws

A recent survey taken in Great Britain determines the country's ten most obsolete - or downright stupid - laws. Included was the one that prohibits the eating of mince pies on Christmas Day, and several that date from the Middle Ages.

"The Other Boleyn Girl" to premiere in February 2008

A trailer for the new Tudor romance, The Other Boleyn Girl is now available to view online. The film is scheduled to hit the theatres February 29, 2008.

Archaeologists investigate medieval disaster

British archaeologists are digging through centuries of rubble to search for clues to a medieval disaster: the burning of Mansfield Woodhouse and its church in 1304.

Great Hall of the Old Deanery for sale in England

A 13th century medieval hall, located in the Salisbury Cathedral Close in England is up for sale. Originally built as a residence for 60 deans, the building was completely restored in 1963 and has been available as a venue for rent.

Infant mortality research abstract online

The News for Medievalists blog reports that a research paper dealing with the topic of infant mortality has been published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Saxon remains found in Twyford

Workers on the site of a school in Twyford, England worried when they discovered human remains until it was determined that the skeletons belonged to 1,300-year-old Saxons.

An academic reviews "Beowulf"

Tim Machan, professor of English at Marquette University, offers his thoughts on the latest version (2007) of Beowulf. He finds it "consistent to the original atmosphere that produced it."