English

"Remarkable" Roman settlement found in Cumbria

Workers laying a sewer pipeline near Penrith, England have discovered the remains of a "remarkable" Roman settlement complete with cobbled streets and timber houses. The village may have been part of the local fort and used for housing soldiers' families.

Coverup masks reason for demise of the Mary Rose

A new study presents the theory that Henry VIII's flagship the Mary Rose was sunk by a French cannonball, a fact that was covered up to save the image of the English Navy.

Sewer construction unearths Roman and medieval settlements in Cumbria

Sewer construction near Penrith in northern England has uncovered a Roman settlement a mere meter beneath the soil. The project has also unearthed several medieval buildings, including a rare Grubenhauser. (photos)

Worshipful Company of Glovers of London catalogue online

The Worshipful Company of Glovers of London, formed 700 years ago to "upkeep the standards of glove-making in the City" has gone modern with an online catalogue of its collection.

Great Bath gets a bath

The Great Bath at the city of Bath, England's famous Roman Baths, is being given a cleaning to remove a buildup of sludge and algae. (photo)

Cistercians in Yorkshire Project

The Cistercians in Yorkshire Project, a UK£50 million UK-wide digitalization program, is "designed to enable the learning materials and resources currently contained in galleries, communities, libraries, museums, universities and other centres of excellence, to be directly accessible to homes and communities via the internet."

14th century silver mount discovered in County Durham, England

A metal detector hobbyist has discovered a 14th century silver mount, believed to have been used "as a decorative item on leather clothes," near Barnard Castle, County Durham, England. (photo)

Latin to be banned in official British documents

Classical scholars in Great Britain are appalled by the recent decision by some local councils to ban the use of Latin words and phrases from official documents. The bureaucrats say that Latin is no longer widely understood.

The lost art of hedge-laying returns to England

The art of hedge-laying pre-dates Roman Britain, a fact documented by Julius Caesar who wrote in 55 BCE, "It was fashioned of slender trees, bent over so that many branches came out along the length...so that it could not be penetrated or even seen through." Modern life has been hard on the hedges, but new interest may save the ancient craft.

"1066: the Movie" awaiting release

1066: the Movie, a film starring Gary Daniels and Martin Klebba, was scheduled for release in September 2008, but has yet to hit theaters. The website includes production information, a blog, a gallery and a really great poster.

Gold ring may have belonged to Norman royalty

British metal detector enthusiast Peter Beasley was intrigued recently when he pulled a heavy gold ring from the ground near Petersfield, England. Now experts believe that the ring may have belonged to Robert, the eldest son of William the Conquerer. (photo)

Monty Python YouTube Channel

Learn all about the legend of King Arthur, the story of Brian, how to avoid killer rabbits, and even the Meaning of Life on the official Monty Python channel on YouTube.

Archaeologists continue to search for Hull's ancient friary

Archaeologists working on an excavation in the town of Hull, Yorkshire, are delighted to have discovered the medieval Humber Gate, but are still looking for the elusive Carmelite friary, built in the town in the late 1290's.

Looking for St. Edmunds

A high-tech survey is underway with hopes of learning more about Suffolk, England's ancient shrine to St. Edmund. The geophysical survey will look for traces of the "outline of vanished workshops, storerooms and refectories - the evidence of an extinct way of life" in the abbey ruins in Bury St Edmunds.

Underwear past and present: the legacy of Janet Arnold

The BBC's online magazine marks the posthumous release of Janet Arnold's fourth volume of Patterns of Fashion with an article on underwear trends.

Druid grave discovered near Colchester, England

The grave of a 1st century Druid, possibly the first such discovery in England, has been found in Stanway, near Colchester in eastern England. The body in the grave was one of a number of important people buried near the time of the Roman invasion.

Digital books available from the British Library

In its Treasures in Full program, the British Library is offering "high-quality digital editions, free to your desktop."

13th century brooch declared treasure

A 13th century pentambular brooch discovered by a metal detector is Hampshire, England, in February 2008 has been declared treasure by North East Hampshire coroner Andrew Bradley. (photo)

Anglo Saxon grave reveals links to royalty

The recent discovery of high-status jewelry buried in an Anglo Saxon grave in East Cleveland, England has experts buzzing. The 7th century artifacts are linked to the Northumbrian Royal family.

Alcohol factor in wave of vandalism of British historic sites

Drunken youths are being blamed for the wave of vandalism targeting Britain's historic buildings. More than 170 incidents involving castles, monasteries and stately homes, have been recorded during the past year.

Which wife are you?

Have you lost sleep at night wondering which wife of Henry VIII you most resemble? Well, help is on the way in the form of a quiz on the OKCupid website.

Vindolanda site receives funds for museum upgrade

The Roman fort of Vindolanda in northern England will receive UK£4M from the Heritage Lottery. The money will be used to upgrade the museum allowing them space to display many of the Roman site's spectacular discoveries.

Henry VIII biography marks king's 500th anniversary

Henry: Virtuous Prince by David Starkey, a two-volume biography of Henry VIII, will mark the 500th anniversary of Henry's ascent to the throne of England. John Guy of the London Times has the review.

10th century timber-lined cellar found in York

Archaeologists working on excavations at the site of the new Hungate development in York, England, have discovered what they believe is the basement of a two-story Viking house. The structure has been dated to mid 10th century. (photo)

Henry VIII-era chain of office set for auction

On November 6, 2008, the only known surviving chain of office from the time of King Henry VIII will be auctioned at Christie's in London. The chain is expected to bring at least UK£300,000. (photo)

"Gateway to the Roman invasion" found

New excavations in Kent, England have uncovered the hard surface of the country's coastline during the first Roman invasion (43 C.E.). The coast would have been two miles from the current coast. Also found: a Roman wall and a medieval dock.

Pirate hoard found in London

Arghhh! There be pirates in London. Or at least there once were according to experts excavating the Narrow Street area of Ratcliff, near Limehouse. The site included the homes of 17th century sailors and pirates.

Norman contributions to the English language ala Garrison Keillor

In his weekly podcast for September 24, 2008, humorist Garrison Keillor commemorates the 1066 Norman invasion of England with a discussion of how the French language affected food and cooking terms.

Stonehenge dating controversy continues

New research on Stonehenge finds that it is actually older than previously believed. A recent excavation headed by Mike Parker-Pearson, professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, finds the monument to date to 3000 BCE and to have connections to cremation of the dead.

Prop and costume sale at New Jersey theatre October 25, 2008

On Saturday October 25, 2008, the Shakespeare Theatre Of New Jersey will open its doors for a sale of costumes, props and masks in an effort to raise money for the Theatre's educational and artistic programs.