English

Early medieval inscribed finger ring found in England

Antiquities specialist Brett Hammond was impressed with a medieval finger ring discovered by a metal detector from Hinckley, England. "It was clearly an important item of treasure. It is a gold ring possibly containing a rare black diamond," he said. (photo)

British metal detector finds 5th century pendant

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Sales, from Deal, England, was fortunate recently to uncover a 5th century "gold tremissis bearing the image of the Byzantine emperor, Anastasius the First." (photo)

Downloads of books on traditional crafts available online

A British website, Countryside Agency Archive, offers free, downloadable books on a number of traditional crafts including blacksmithing, thatching, saddlery, wheel making and furniture design.

Tudor paneling recovered from cow shed

A large, carved panel celebrating the Earldom of Charles Somerset, stolen from Raglan Castle during the English Civil War in the 17th Century, has been returned to the castle. The piece was found in a cowshed in Monmouthshire during the 1950s by an antique dealer. (photo)

Female remains found in Newcastle Roman sarcophagus

Archaeologists working on a burial site near Newcastle, England, have opened a pair of sarcophagi, one containing the remains of a child, and the other the remains of a woman. The site is believed to have been a former chapel near Hadrian's wall dating to the 4th century C.E. (video)

Metal detector finds 7th century gold cross

A treasure hunter has found an Anglo Saxon gold cross dating to the 7th century on a farm in Nottinghamshire, England. The cross, set with red gemstones, might have originally held a relic, and is valued at UK£25,000. (photo)

Royal books to be displayed in London

Over 100 illustrated books, previously owned by British monarchs, will go on display at the British Library in 2011. The manuscript exhibition will include "medieval and Renaissance books and other literary artefacts."

"The Theatre" discovered in London

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the remains of The Theatre. Built in 1576, the venue is very likely the place where Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" and "Romeo and Juliet" debuted. Walls of the building were discovered under a vacant garage.

"Caesar" donated to charity shop

The 2,000-year-old skeleton of a Roman greyhound has been donated to a Lincolnshire, England charity shop. The bones were first discovered at the Lawn in Lincoln in 1986, and are believed to date to the Roman era.

Language barrior key to the sinking of the Mary Rose?

New research on the sinking of the Tudor ship The Mary Rose speculates that the ship may have been lost due to the lack of English language skills by the mostly Spanish crew. The theory might help explain the cryptic shout of "George Carew, to another English ship, that his men were 'knaves I cannot rule.'"

Henry VIII collar found

A complete double-S collar presented as a reward for exceptional service by Henry VIII to Edward Montagu, then Lord Chief Justice, has been found in the family home of poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant bought by British Museum

The British Museum recently raised UK£350,000 to buy a rare 14th century astrolabe discovered in Kent, England in 2005. The Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant is one of only eight such instruments in the world. (photo)

Magna Carta exhibit to help fund cathedral restoration

The Lincoln Magna Carta, a once forgotten original 1215 version of the document, will be placed on exhibit at the Fraunces Tavern Museum on Pearl Street in New York City for three months as part of a fund-raising effort by England's Lincoln Cathedral.

Renaissance humor explained

Dr. Sarah Knight, a lecturer in Renaissance literature, explains Renaissance humor in an interview for the BBC.

Alleged Bayeux vandal cleared

In an announcement at the major conference on the Bayeux Tapestry which took place recently at the British Museum, Anna Eliza Stothard was cleared of an accusation of vandalizing the tapestry.

Re-enacting medieval cavalry with Henrik Olsgaard

Finnvarr has posted an "account of Duke Henrik of Havn's participation in the reenactments at Hastings in 2000/2006" on his blog. The article discusses re-enacting the medieval cavalry.

Sutton Hoo Society to present "Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall"

The Sutton Hoo Society will present Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall: The Roots of English Culture on October 25, 2008 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England. Registration costs 35 pounds per day for adults and 17 pounds for students.

Romans lived "stylish lives" in Britain

The lifestyles of the rich and famous Romans are being studied through archaeology at Caerwent, Monmouthshire by Channel 4's Time Team. One of the best-preserved Roman towns in Britain includes shops, streets, a temple and a bath.

Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall

description:
Arts and Crafts in the Mead Hall: The Roots of English Culture is the 2008 conference of the Sutton Hoo Society.

It will take place October 25, 2008 at the Woodbridge School Conference Centre in Woodbridge, England. Cost is 35 pounds / 17 pounds for students.

For more details: http://www.suttonhoo.org/ Location:
Woodbridge, England

Britain Before the Domesday at Pennsic

Baroness Eithni ingen Talorgain invites Pennsic War attendees to take part in "Britain before the Domesday," a day of activities celebrating early medieval Britain.

Medieval malting upholds Bury St Edmunds brewing tradition

The archaeological discovery of a structure that is thought to be a medieval malting in Bury St Edmunds, England has added to the town's long-standing relationship with beer. Once the site of a wealthy monastery of brewing monks, the town now hosts the Greene King Brewery.

Britain Before the Domesday

description:
Please join us at Pennsic for a day of activities celebrating early medieval Britain. There will be space for A&S displays, Artisans’ Row type activities, small classes, and general opportunities to discuss early Britain. Cold beverages and light snacks will be served.

Please contact the coordinator if you are interested in teaching a short class, showing a piece in the A&S display, or demonstrating an activity on our Artisans’ Row. Location:
Pennsic War (Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania)

Date of Roman invasion of Britain recalculated

Professors Donald W. Olson and Russell Doescher of Texas State University, along with some of their students, used subtle astronomical clues to recalculate the date of Caesar's invasion of Britain. Their findings have been published in the August 2008 Sky & Telescope magazine.

Northumberland Iron Age dig one of largest ever in NE England

Archaeologists working at the Delhi surface mine in Northumberland, England have unearthed the remains of at least 50 Iron Age houses, making the project one of the largest in northeast England's archaeological history.

St Margaret's church in Leicester, England ransacked by vandals

Police in Leicester, England report that vandals broke into and desecrated a 13th century church in the city's center, overturning lecterns, breaking windows and defecating through a floor panel into the church's medieval foundation.

Route of "lost" Roman road determined

After 30 years of research, experts in England now believe that they have determined the route of the "lost" Roman road, which stretched between Castleshaw fort near Oldham and Slack fort Outlane, through the Pennines.

13th century tower foundations found under Oxford mound

Workers on Oxford Castle's mound were surprised to discover the remains of a 13th century, 10-sided tower which once stood on the mound.

Queen of England strips Knight of his title

HRM Elizabeth II, Queen of England, has stripped Robert Mugabe, President of Zimbabwe, of his knighthood in a move to protest the human rights abuses in his country.

Youthful portrait of Elizabeth I discovered

A rare portrait of the young Elizabeth I dating from between 1650 to 1680 has been discovered in a private collection at Boughton House in Northamptonshire.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.