English

Date of Roman invasion of Britain recalculated

Professors Donald W. Olson and Russell Doescher of Texas State University, along with some of their students, used subtle astronomical clues to recalculate the date of Caesar's invasion of Britain. Their findings have been published in the August 2008 Sky & Telescope magazine.

Northumberland Iron Age dig one of largest ever in NE England

Archaeologists working at the Delhi surface mine in Northumberland, England have unearthed the remains of at least 50 Iron Age houses, making the project one of the largest in northeast England's archaeological history.

St Margaret's church in Leicester, England ransacked by vandals

Police in Leicester, England report that vandals broke into and desecrated a 13th century church in the city's center, overturning lecterns, breaking windows and defecating through a floor panel into the church's medieval foundation.

Route of "lost" Roman road determined

After 30 years of research, experts in England now believe that they have determined the route of the "lost" Roman road, which stretched between Castleshaw fort near Oldham and Slack fort Outlane, through the Pennines.

13th century tower foundations found under Oxford mound

Workers on Oxford Castle's mound were surprised to discover the remains of a 13th century, 10-sided tower which once stood on the mound.

Queen of England strips Knight of his title

HRM Elizabeth II, Queen of England, has stripped Robert Mugabe, President of Zimbabwe, of his knighthood in a move to protest the human rights abuses in his country.

Youthful portrait of Elizabeth I discovered

A rare portrait of the young Elizabeth I dating from between 1650 to 1680 has been discovered in a private collection at Boughton House in Northamptonshire.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.

Vindolanda dig reveals massive granaries

Recent excavations at England's Roman fort Vindolanda have revealed impressive structures, exceeding even the officers' quarters, to house the fort's grain supply. The dig also uncovered "a magnificent flagged roadway next to the granaries."

Chichester's Roman baths to become new tourist destination

First discovered in the 1970s by Chichester archaeologist Alec Down, the British city's Roman baths are scheduled to re-emerge from beneath the car park under which they were buried 17 years ago. The city hopes they will become the centerpiece of a new museum.

Stonehenge should keep its secrets, opines essay

The recent discovery of graves at Stonehenge has led to a frenzy of speculation and proposed activity regarding the origins of the site. One commentator feels that the ancient structure should keep its secrets.

Shakespeare First Folio brings over UK£400,000 at auction

A rare Shakespeare First Folio was auctioned by Christies recently bringing UK£435,250 from an unnamed purchaser. The book was sold to Sir Thomas Munro of Lindertis in 1837 and remained in the family until the 1970s when bought by Christies.

Renaissance armor at the Folger until September 2008

The Great Hall of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. glints with Renaissance armor as the library presents the exhibit Now Thrive the Armorers: Arms and Armor in Shakespeare June 5 through September 9, 2008.

Early medieval jewelry found in Bridgewater

Strike up another point for British metal detectorists! A rare early medieval (400 to 500 C.E.) silver pinhead was found in 2006 by Timothy Phillips in a plowed field near Brigewater, England. The 2 cm decoration would originally been attached to a pin, much like a hatpin. (photo)

Shipwreck cannons to be returned to the Tower of London

Marine archaeologists are working to recover the cannons from an Elizabethan ship which sank near the Channel Islands in 1592. The big guns will be taken to the Tower of London for expert restoration and conservation.

Study finds Stonehenge may have been royal burial ground

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, say that radiocarbon dating of remains from Stonehenge suggest that the site was a burial ground for Britain's first royal dynasty, as early as 500 years before the stones were erected.

Kristina and the Red Knight

8-year-old Kristina Roberts is no spoiled princess! What she dreamed of most was to enter a real joust. Recently her dream came true at Warwick Castle in England. (photo)

New Janet Arnold book to be released November 2008

Janet Arnold's Patterns of Fashion: Cut and Construction of Linen Shirts, Smocks, Neck and Headwear, Etc., C. 1540-1665 No. 4 has been scheduled for release in late fall of 2008.

Was Shakespeare really a Jewish woman?

Shakespeare expert John Hudson has a new theory about who authored the Bard's plays: a Jewish woman named Amelia Bassano Lanier, the first woman to publish a book of poetry.

St. Albans: "Beating the Bounds" since 1250!

The English city of St. Albans takes its history seriously and celebrates yearly with the Beating of the Bounds, a procession dating to the mid 13th century which marks the boundaries of the town.

Westminster Abbey's "carpet of stone" revealed

A two-year restoration project has revealed the breathtaking details of a medieval mosaic pavement, depicting the end of the world, in the floor of London's Westminster Abbey. The floor was originally constructed in the 1260s by Henry III>

The Soldier in later Medieval England

An innovative new research project, sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, will look at the life of the professional soldier in England from 1369 to 1453.

Viking sword find wows experts on Isle of Man

Dan Crowe and Rob Farrer of the Manx Detectorists Society have found artifacts with their metal detectors before, but nothing quite as dramatic as fragments of a Viking sword, a rare find on the Isle of Man. (photo)

Portrait of Shakespeare's patron discovered

Experts believe they have discovered a portrait of Henry Wriothesley, Shakespeare's only known patron, under a later portrait of his wife, Elizabeth Vernon. The painted-over image was discovered using X-ray technology. (photo)

Did smallpox kill Gloucester Romans?

Experts working on the recently-discovered mass Roman grave in Gloucester, England will be using DNA tests to determine what killed over 90 individuals. A first look at the remains points to a 2nd century smallpox outbreak that swept across Britain.

Ann Hathaway steps out of the shadows

Best known for her quaint house and her inheritance of the “second-best bed,” Shakespeare's wife, Ann Hathaway, has been mostly a mystery figure. Now a new book, Shakespeare's Wife by Germaine Greer, sheds some light on a little-understood woman. Katie Roiphe as the New York Times Sunday Review.

Germanic society in England may not have been as brutal as once believed

Recent scientific studies have suggested that the Germanic invaders of England may have imposed an apartheid-like system on the native peoples, but an article by John Pattison of the University of South Australia in Adelaide disagrees. "The evidence is compatible with the idea of a much more integrated society," he says.

Anglo Saxon priestess grave found in Yorkshire

Archaeologists are studying the grave of a 7th century Anglo Saxon woman who might have been a Pagan priestess. By the placement of the grave and the objects within, including a sword and elaborate jewelry, they feel that the woman may have headed a 7th century cult. (photo)

Lead church roofs target of English thieves

England's historic churches are facing a new enemy: lead thieves, who are now stealing strips of lead from church roofs. The thefts are being blamed on the record high price that lead brings.

Sherwood's "Thynghowe" may be Anglo-Saxon mound

Husband and wife Lynda Mallet and Stuart Reddish discovered a mysterious mound three years ago in Sherwood Forest, Nottingham, England with the help of 19th century maps. Now they believe the site may have been an Anglo-Saxon gathering place.