English

Henry VIII-era chain of office set for auction

On November 6, 2008, the only known surviving chain of office from the time of King Henry VIII will be auctioned at Christie's in London. The chain is expected to bring at least UK£300,000. (photo)

"Gateway to the Roman invasion" found

New excavations in Kent, England have uncovered the hard surface of the country's coastline during the first Roman invasion (43 C.E.). The coast would have been two miles from the current coast. Also found: a Roman wall and a medieval dock.

Pirate hoard found in London

Arghhh! There be pirates in London. Or at least there once were according to experts excavating the Narrow Street area of Ratcliff, near Limehouse. The site included the homes of 17th century sailors and pirates.

Norman contributions to the English language ala Garrison Keillor

In his weekly podcast for September 24, 2008, humorist Garrison Keillor commemorates the 1066 Norman invasion of England with a discussion of how the French language affected food and cooking terms.

Stonehenge dating controversy continues

New research on Stonehenge finds that it is actually older than previously believed. A recent excavation headed by Mike Parker-Pearson, professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, finds the monument to date to 3000 BCE and to have connections to cremation of the dead.

Prop and costume sale at New Jersey theatre October 25, 2008

On Saturday October 25, 2008, the Shakespeare Theatre Of New Jersey will open its doors for a sale of costumes, props and masks in an effort to raise money for the Theatre's educational and artistic programs.

Dressing well... or else

Toshikage reports that there is much of interest in the way of Elizabethan garb and late period study on the website Elizabethan Mafia: Dressing Well and Calling In Favors Since 1558. The site is the brainchild of M. Alison Kannon.

Digital project to analyze Middle English grammar

A team of philologists at the University of Stavanger in Norway are set to begin "the most comprehensive analysis of middle English ever" by studying original manuscripts from the 1300s–1500s. Their focus is to understand Middle English grammar.

York skeleton shows signs of tuberculosis

The remains of a 4th century Roman discovered recently at York University may be "one of the earliest British victims of tuberculosis." Experts believe that cases of TB were rare in the north of England, and the discovery may help researchers learn more about the disease's spread across the country.

Roman bones found near Fosse Way

Several ancient graves were found recently near Leicestershire, England containing the remains of several humans believed to have been Roman. The graves were found near the Roman Fosse Way.

"Forme of Cury," King Richard II's recipe book, online

A manuscript containing over 400 recipes dating to the time of King Richard II is being digitized in preparation for online release. The manuscript is one of 40 in a project by the University of Manchester's John Rylands University Library. (photo)

"Hogwarts Professor" claims alchemy used to change characters in Potter books

John Granger believes there is so much more to the Harry Potter universe than magic potions. He shares his thoughts through a series of books and lectures which, he hopes, "disclose the underlying symbolism hidden in the so-called 'children’s stories.'"

Re-enactor fairs provide shopping opportunities

Genevieve reports that two living history fairs aimed at separating re-enactors from their coin will take place this fall in Great Britain.

Abbey found at Abbeytown

It shouldn't have come as a surprise that archaeologists were able to uncover the remains of a 12th century abbey at Abbeytown in West Cumbria, England, but the discovery was made during rebuilding of the more recent Holme Cultram Abbey which burned in 2006.

Lakenheath dig reveals 450 Saxon graves

Over 400 graves dating to the Saxon period have been discovered at the site of a road project near the RAF facility Lakenheath in Suffolk, England.

Community aids in discovery of Roman road

Over 40 members of the community recently helped to uncover a previously unknown section of Roman road near Minshull Vernon, England. The road would have connected Whitchurch to Middlewich.

Laurel Challenges Met

On Saturday the XX of September, A.S. XLIII, a Laurel's Challenge was held at the St. Festus Faire in the Barony of Dragonship Haven (Southern CT).

Medieval road mapping project reveals 12th century tannery

A team of experts working on a project to map Norman and Saxon roads through central England failed to find them in Wallingford, but instead unearthed a 12th to 13th century tannery.

Leaveth Anne Boleyn alone!

It just had to happen! A parody of Chris Crocker's [in]famous "Leave Britney Alone" video is available to view on YouTube, this time with a distinctly Tudor flair.

"Unrivaled" Roman villa revealed on Isle of Wight

Archaeologists are marveling over the scope of a 2nd century Roman villa revealed recently on the Isle of Wight in England. The Brading Roman Villa is as "big as an Olympic swimming pool," and includes ornate decorations. (photo)

Early medieval inscribed finger ring found in England

Antiquities specialist Brett Hammond was impressed with a medieval finger ring discovered by a metal detector from Hinckley, England. "It was clearly an important item of treasure. It is a gold ring possibly containing a rare black diamond," he said. (photo)

British metal detector finds 5th century pendant

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Sales, from Deal, England, was fortunate recently to uncover a 5th century "gold tremissis bearing the image of the Byzantine emperor, Anastasius the First." (photo)

Downloads of books on traditional crafts available online

A British website, Countryside Agency Archive, offers free, downloadable books on a number of traditional crafts including blacksmithing, thatching, saddlery, wheel making and furniture design.

Tudor paneling recovered from cow shed

A large, carved panel celebrating the Earldom of Charles Somerset, stolen from Raglan Castle during the English Civil War in the 17th Century, has been returned to the castle. The piece was found in a cowshed in Monmouthshire during the 1950s by an antique dealer. (photo)

Female remains found in Newcastle Roman sarcophagus

Archaeologists working on a burial site near Newcastle, England, have opened a pair of sarcophagi, one containing the remains of a child, and the other the remains of a woman. The site is believed to have been a former chapel near Hadrian's wall dating to the 4th century C.E. (video)

Metal detector finds 7th century gold cross

A treasure hunter has found an Anglo Saxon gold cross dating to the 7th century on a farm in Nottinghamshire, England. The cross, set with red gemstones, might have originally held a relic, and is valued at UK£25,000. (photo)

Royal books to be displayed in London

Over 100 illustrated books, previously owned by British monarchs, will go on display at the British Library in 2011. The manuscript exhibition will include "medieval and Renaissance books and other literary artefacts."

"The Theatre" discovered in London

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the remains of The Theatre. Built in 1576, the venue is very likely the place where Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" and "Romeo and Juliet" debuted. Walls of the building were discovered under a vacant garage.

"Caesar" donated to charity shop

The 2,000-year-old skeleton of a Roman greyhound has been donated to a Lincolnshire, England charity shop. The bones were first discovered at the Lawn in Lincoln in 1986, and are believed to date to the Roman era.

Language barrior key to the sinking of the Mary Rose?

New research on the sinking of the Tudor ship The Mary Rose speculates that the ship may have been lost due to the lack of English language skills by the mostly Spanish crew. The theory might help explain the cryptic shout of "George Carew, to another English ship, that his men were 'knaves I cannot rule.'"