English

How to cook a porpoise

Richard II's recipe for cooking a porpoise is now available online. The recipe is included in a new digitized version of The Forme of Cury, the 15th century text long used by historians to re-create medieval recipes. (video)

Volunteers find Roman artifacts on first day of dig

An archaeological dig in Lincolnshire, England, which teams professional and volunteers, has led to satisfying results on its first day. Among items found: "Roman coins, flints and walls."

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

Workers puzzled over medieval document found in cabinet drawer

Staff at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario are scratching their heads over the discovery of a mid 13th century legal document found at the bottom of a university filing cabinet.

"World's most complete known witch bottle" found in Greenwich, England

A "witch bottle," constructed according to known recipes from 16th and 17th century England, has been found buried upside-down in Greenwich, England. The bottle contains urine, nail clippings, hair and pins, and is believed to be an anti-witchcraft device.

The riddle of the skulls

Archaeologists in Dorset, England are trying to uncover the mystery of a burial pit full of skulls dating to Roman times. The 45 skulls discovered so far all appear to belong to young men.

3rd century skeletons surprise pond builders

Gardeners digging a pond near Mowmacre, England were surprised to find human remains beneath their shovels. The two skeletons have been dated to 3rd century Roman Britain, and were found along with bits of pottery.

New excavations at Stonehenge may prove site a place of sacred healing

It has been over 40 years since any significant excavation have been done at Stonehenge, but during the spring of 2009, that changed when Timothy Darvill, professor of archaeology at Bournemouth University, and Geoffrey Wainwright, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, headed a new dig in the monument's inner circle.

Experts continue to debate mystery of Sutton Hoo

Archaeologists agree that the person buried at Sutton Hoo in East Anglia at the beginning of the 7th century must have been a king, but opinions differ on which king he was. New studies seem to indicate that the ship burial held Raedwald, King of east Anglia and King of the Britains.

Medieval stained glass inspires mosaic artists

What to do with thousands of fragments of medieval pottery? Make them into a mosaic work of art mirroring a 13th century stained glass window, of course! That is what Emma Biggs and Matthew Colling have done at St Mary’s Church, in Castlegate, England.

2nd century scandal at Vindolanda

Researchers studying the Vindolanda tablets, wooden documents detailing everyday life in Roman Britain, believe that five of the tablets show evidence of graft among public officials. (photo).

15th century Redbook?

While doing research on medieval romance tales, Canadian professor James Weldon made a fascinating discovery: the first women's magazine. The manuscript, known as Biblioteca Nazionale, produced on paper in 1457, is a fascinating collection of recipes and romances aimed at the female reader. (photo)

The cost of Hadrian's Wall

In today's world of astronomical construction costs, what would it cost to build Hadrian's Wall? The British company Carillion thinks it knows.

Ripon limekiln is an "important find"

British archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a 500-year-old limekiln behind Ripon House in Leeds, England. Constructed in the mid-15th century, the kiln is one of the largest medieval structures ever found in England. (photo)

Henry VIII annulment letter revealed

On the 500th anniversary of the coronation of England's King Henry VIII, the Vatican has permitted scholars a look at the letter requesting an annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. The Vatican denies any connection between the two events.

New Stonehenge visitor center is a "go"

The long controversy is over. English Heritage's plan to build a new visitor center and divert a nearby road at Stonehenge has finally been approved. The program will cost an estimated UK£25m.

Current Viroconium "only tip of the iceberg"

Experts from English Heritage have declared that excavations at Shropshire’s Wroxeter Roman City, Viroconium, have so far revealed "only the tip of the iceberg," and plan to uncover the rest of the city.

Vindolanda Writing Tablets to return home

Thanks to a UK£1.8m grant from regional development agency One North East, the Vindolanda Writing Tablets, the rich chronicle of Roman military in Britain, will be coming home to Vindolanda for "a rolling programme of displays" in 2012.

16th century acorn button declared treasure

Experts from the British Museum have authenticated a silver button, fashioned in the shape of an acorn, and declared it treasure. They have dated it to the 16th century. (photo)

BBC's Channel 4 takes on Hastings

In mid-May, 2009, Channel 4 of the BBC premiered a two-part mini-series dramatizing the events leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The film, 1066: the Battle for Middle Earth, was directed by Justin Hardy who was interviewed for the Telegraph.

Roman vicus sheds light on the last days of Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on a Roman settlement near Bowes, England have discovered a vicus, an unplanned settlement on the outskirts of the fort dating to the 2nd to 3rd centuries, which would have been home to hundreds of people.

Renaissance Dancers "bring the Elizabethan period to life"

Among the theatres of London's Southwark disrict roam the Renaissance Dancers, a group of amateur dress and costume enthusiasts dedicated to bringing the dances of Elizabethan England to life. An article for Fabrics-Store.com newsletter tells their story. (photo)

Medieval conference marks Cambridge University's 800th anniversary

Knowledge and Learning in the Middle Ages: A Conference Celebrating the 800th Anniversary of the University of Cambridge is the title of the one-day conference hosted by the Magdalene Society of Medievalists. registration is now open for the June 13, 2009 conference.

Murder of Thomas a Becket subject of medieval Spanish paintings

An important link between the joined histories of England and Spain remains covered by wooden panels in a ruined church in Soria, Spain. The panels depict the murder of St. Thomas a Becket, an act that sat heavily on the shoulders of king Henry II of England. (photo)

Roman road being destroyed by 4x4s

The last remnants of a Roman road from Wandlebury to Horseheath, England are being destroyed by trail bikers and 4x4 drivers who using it as a race track.

Britain' Queen participates in ancient Easter custom

Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain recreated a custom dating to the 13th century recently by handing out "Maundy Money," a tradition of doling out coins to pensioners. (video)

NPR series follows path of modern Canterbury pilgrims

A recent multi-part NPR series retraces the steps of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales pilgrims in modern England from London to Canterbury. The site includes an interactive map of the journey.

Pub evacuated due to Holy Grenade of Antioch

The bomb squad was recently called to a pub in Shoreditch, east London when workers from the water company discovered a suspicious object. Such an evacuation is not an unusual occurrence in today's terrorist-conscious world, but these workers must not have been fans of Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

[DRA] Winchester Pilgrimage IV

Come all ye pilgrims and travelers, and join the Shire of West Dragoningshire for a pilgrimage at the Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty. Share with us in an evening of Chaucer; a morning pilgrimage to Winchester Cathedral, an afternoon demonstration of our fighting skills, and an evening of feasting and storytelling.

Exhibit shows "true colors" of Tudor tapestry

Light analysis was used to determine the original colors of a huge tapestry commissioned by Henry VIII. The tapestry is now on display at Hampton Court until January 3, 2010 in commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the king's accession to the throne.