English

Anglo-Saxon game piece found in Kent great hall

Archaeologists excavating the remains of an Anglo-Saxon in Lyminge, Kent have discovered a game piece "made from a hollow piece of bone closed with delicately turned wooden caps, held in place with a bronze pin," part of a high-end backgammon set. (photo)

Leicestershire lead coffin opened

A team of experts from Archaeology Warwickshire and York University have opened the 1,700-year-old lead coffin discovered recently near Hinckley, England, and have begun examination of its contents.

Tudor Monastery Farm on BBC 2

Watchers of BBC 2 may want to catch up on the latest episodes of The Tudor Monastery Farm, where modern experts "work as ordinary farmers under the eye of a monastic landlord, learning to master the landscape away from the farm in order to supplement their income."

Rare Celtic "pillow stone" discovered in North Devon

In 2012, 15-year-old Jack Lawrence discovered an odd stone in the rubble from a wall once part of Shutes Cottage in West Down, England. The stone bears the inscription "Guerngen" and is believed to have been a "pillow stone," placed at the head of a grave.

Plans considered to unearth Roman baths in Exeter

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral in England is consulting with English Heritage about possible plans to make the Roman baths under Cathedral Green more accessible to the public. The baths were first discovered in 1971.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

3D X-ray to reveal secrets of "unreadable" scroll

"Having the chance to unlock a part of Norfolk history which has been closed to us for maybe hundreds of years feels very special," said Gary Tuson, from the Norfolk Records Office about plans to x-ray a 15th century scroll that is too delicate to unroll.

Pre-fire London virtualization wins game company award

Travelers to London are sometimes disappointed to find little of the city's medieval past on tourist maps, thanks to the 17th century fire which destroyed much of the city. Now a team of students offers the next best thing with a virtual "fly-through" of Tudor London.

What's with the snails?

In a blog article for Smithsonian, Colin Schultz wonders why in English manuscripts from the 13th and 14th centuries, knights are always fighting snails. (photos)

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Newborough dig may stall energy construction

Archaeological digs on a farm near Newborough, England have unearthed several layers of history from Roman to Saxon times. The excavations were commissioned before the land could be used for proposed renewable energy parks.

Archaeological forensics not like CSI

The public has learned to expect DNA testing to answer all archaeological questions, but this is not always the case according to Stephanie Pappas, Senior Writer for LiveScience. One good example is the mummified head, long believed to be that of King Henry IV of France, the investigation of which has led experts on a merry chase.

House Book of York on display at Yorkshire Museum

The civic archive of the city of York, England has loaned the 15th century House Book of the city to the Yorkshire Museum until December 2013. The book will be on display for the first time in history. The manuscript details public opinion of King Richard III.

Weapons stolen from British re-enactor

History buff and medieval re-enactor Michael St Omer of Hadlow, England is devastated by the recent theft of swords, archery gear and other equipment from his parents' garage. "I can replace the weapons but they were the first ones I ever had and they meant a lot to me," he said.

Leicester car park mystery continues

Archaeologists are puzzled by the revelation that the occupant of a lead coffin found yards from the grave of Richard III in Leicester, England might be a woman. The grave was believed to have been that of Sir William de Moton.

New Shakespeare collection to include "Apocrypha"

Have you heard of Shakespeare's Mucedorus? Neither have most people, since the late 16th century play has been attributed to someone else. But now, thanks to linguistic "fingerprinting," Shakespeare's involvement in the writing of the play may have been proven.

Restoration allows public to return to St Mary's Priory

Restoration work at 13th century St Mary's Priory in the coastal village of Beeston Regis, England has been completed at a cost just over UK£13,000. Repairs included restoration of 19th century gates and a vandalized roof. (photo)

Elizabeth reference found in Raleigh portrait

The recent restoration of a portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh has revealed a secret: a hidden crescent moon over water, a symbol of the explorer's devotion to Queen Elizabeth I. The portrait is on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London until January 5, 2014. (photo)

Shakespeare: Women in tights

From Sarah Bernhardt to Helen Mirren, women have longed from - and won - the meaty male parts in Shakespeare's plays. New York Times columnist Alexis Soloski looks at women playing Shakespearean heroes in a recent article.

Battlefield discovery inhibits rail construction

Riders of a English railways will have to wait a little longer for the HS2 line thanks to the discovery of a previously "lost" site of a Wars of the Roses battlefield. The site of the Battle of Edgecote between the Earl of Warwick and King Edward IV, fought July 26 1469 in Northamptonshire, lies along the route of the high-speed rail link.

Is the turkey leg period?

Turkey legs, a staple of "Ye Olde Renaissance Faire," have often been the subject of debate among cooks and researchers of the time period. The topic returns in the food section of the Kansas City Star in an article by Tim Engle.

Cheapside Hoard scores dedicated exhibition at the Museum of London

In 1912, a tenement building in Cheapside, in the heart of London, was demolished, unearthing one of the rariest treasures in the city's history. Vivienne Becker, of the Telegraph, offers a feature on the Cheapside Hoard, currently on display at the Museum of London. (photos and video)

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

Horse and rider return to Mildenhall

In 1997, the remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior and his horse were discovered, along with over 400 other graves, at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. Now the horse and rider have come home for display at the Mildenhall Museum.

Cross fragment leads to search for Anglo Saxon village

The discovery of part of a stone cross, dating to Anglo Saxon times, has excited archaeologists from Altogether Archaeology excavating St Botolph’s field in Frosterley in Weardale, England. “This is not the kind of thing that happens every day," said Paul Frodsham, historic environment officer at the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Partnership.

Cambridge University lawbreakers catalogued

Jacky Cox, Cambridge University's archivist, has a monumental job ahead of her: creating the first catalogue of thousands of court records from the 16th and 17th centuries, chronicling the misdeeds of students, staff and townspeople attached to the university. About half of the records from Vice-Chancellor's Court (1540-1630) are now summarised online.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

3rd century shop found at Roman Maryport

Archaeologists working at Roman Maryport, along Hadrian's Wall, have discovered evidence of six buildings and a road. One of the buildings is believed to have been a Roman shop.

New sources on the Battle of Crécy

The October 2013 issue of History Today magazine features an article by Richard Barber which looks at recently discovered sources on the Battle of Crécy (1346). An excerpt from Edward III and the Battle of Crécy is available free online. The entire article is reserved for subscribers to the magazine. (photo)

Modern monk accepts tonsure for charity

Re-enacting Ancient Times Society member Matthew Routledge, of March, England, has played Friar Tuck before, but this time he is serious. Routledge is taking on the part of the monk to raise money for the Stroke Association. Elaine King of the Standard 24 has the story.