English

Hadrian's Wall Trust is no more

Over the next six months, the Hadrian's Wall Trust, the charity that maintains the famous Roman wall crossing northern England, will be closed due to "significant financial constraints." In the future, the wall will be maintained by English Heritage and local authorities.

Learning from the teeth of the dead

"It's fantastic we can look in such detail at an individual who died 600 years ago," said Don Walker, an osteologist with the Museum of London about his recent work on remains found last year under London's Charterhouse Square. A study of the teeth has revealed that at least 12 of the skeletons died in the 14th century of the Black Death. (photos)

45,000 English surnames now in database

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Family Names of the United Kingdom Project has completed its first phase with 45,000 surnames, from the 11th to 19th centuries, researched and explained.

The Great Audley's mourning ring found in Norfolk

In his will, Hugh Audley, known as The Great Audley, 16th century philosopher, land owner and money lender - and owner of the land where Buckingham Palace now stands - left 11 mourning rings, designed to be worn by his mourners. Such a ring, linked to him, has been discovered in a south Norfolk field. (photo)

Monastery diet revealed by Durham Cathedral excavation

Archaeologists working on an excavation of a portion of Durham Cathedral, destined to become an exhibition space for the relics of St. Cuthbert, have unearthed over 20,000 animal bones and a "massive amount" of food waste. The site was once part of the monastery's 14th century kitchen. (photos)

Lionheart: "A bad son, a bad husband, a selfish ruler, and a vicious man?"

Richard the Lionheart is a beloved figure in English history, but the name has sparked controversy with many historians who found the king to be not so virtuous. On his history blog for The Telegraph, Dr Dominic Selwood tries to debunk some of the myths surrounding King Richard I.

The man who broke the Sutton Hoo story

In 1939, the biggest news in archaeology was the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Suffolk, England. In a feature story for EADT24, Mike Bowden discusses how his father, Alfred Bowden, known as “Bow,’’ broke the story of the discovery. (photos)

Tolkien's Beowulf to be published for the first time

British professor and author JRR Tolkien is best known for his works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but now a deal has been made to publish the beloved storyteller's translation of the Old English poem Beowulf, complete with commentary.

Master Ark's Jewellery

Master Ark has been creating authentic Medieval jewelry for over 25 years. His cloak clasps, pennanular brooches, fibulas, Thor's hammers, brooches, and pendants are worn throughout the Known World.

You can now keep current with what Master Ark is doing by following his Facebook page.

British books barred from leaving England

The British Library has been successful in acquiring the Catholicon Anglicum, a 15th-century English-Latin dictionary, and a printed traictise owned and annotated by John Ponet, thanks to the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest which barred the books from export.

Fun with Bills of Mortality

For those interested in London's 16th century Bills of Mortality, but don't really want to do the research, comedian David Baddiel has the answer. The Bills are part of his 1997 comedy routine available on YouTube. PG-13 for Language.

London's Borough Market celebrates 1000 years on site

Medievalists visiting London are often disappointed that little of the medieval city remains, but they may be cheered by a walk through of Borough Market in Southwark which is celebrting its millennium. Stephen Halliday has the story for History Today.

Roman house subject of 2014 dig at Maryport

Roman Maryport, near the western edge of Hadrian's Wall, has produced a number of interesting artifacts in previous digs. In 2014, archaeologists will focus on the investigation of a large, 3-room, stone-strip building discovered in 2013. (pictures)

Teller talks Tempest

In celebration of William Shakespeare's 450th birthday, magician Teller (the quiet one), recently co-directed a new version of the Bard's magicial play, The Tempest. In a video, Teller discusses the production with Mark Mobley for a segment of NPR's The Record.

Seeking Howe's

600 years ago, Howe's was a satellite community of Cambridge, England. Then it disappeared off the map. Now archaeologists have begun investigating Howe's, along with three other villages, that ringed the medieval university town.

First century irrigation system found in England

Archaeologists working on a development site in Cambridge, England have discovered what they believe is Great Britain's oldest irrigation system. The Roman site includes evidence of planting beds and pit wells.

Crowdsourcing funds Leiston Abbey dig

Crowd funding and sourcing have reached the archaeological community on the grounds of 12th century Leiston Abbey in Suffolk, England where amateurs funded experts for a two-week project in exchange for a chance to participate.

Bread oven and sewing kit found in Northampton dig

An archaeological excavation in Northampton, England, has thus far revealed the remains of a bread oven, a 13th century well, a 15th century sewing kit and trading tokens, leading experts to believe that there was a settlement in the area. (photos)

Rendlesham exhibit marks 75th anniversary of Sutton Hoo discovery

Four miles northest of the Sutton Hoo ship burials lie what archaeologists believe are the remains of the royal settlement of Rendlesham, mentioned in the 8th century by the Venerable Bede. Finds from recent archaeological excavations will be on display during the 75th anniversary celebration of the Sutton Hoo finds in 2014.

Saving Winchester Roman wall "not possible"

Local historians in Winchester, England are outraged at the proposal that a Roman wall, unearthed in 2013 during construction of 14 new houses, may be destroyed and used as filler for foundations.

"Stunning" Roman bracelet on display in Furness

Trade between the Roman and the British locals may be enbodied by a single silver bracelet, dating to the second century, discovered recently by a metal detectorist near Dalton-in-Furness, England. Probably traded by a Roman soldier visiting the town, the "stunning" bracelet is now on display at Barrow's Dock Museum in Furness. (photo)

Sir Kenneth Branagh wins awards with "Scottish play"

Kenneth Branagh, who has stirred audiences with his portrayals of such diverse characters as Henry V and Gilderoy Lockhart, has won over ciritcs in a new version of Shakespeare's Macbeth, which garnered three prizes at the Manchester Theatre Awards.

The "peaceful conquest" of Roman Britain

Everyone knows that the transition from Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England was a brutal time -- everyone but Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, whose new study in the Journal of Archaeological Science, shows a more peaceful process. (maps)

Vikings gather for Ragnarok

How did you spend Ragnarok? If you are British, you might have celebrated at the JORVIK Viking Festival where warriors fought the Norse gods in an epic battle. Festival director Danielle Daglan spoke with NPR's All Thing's Considered about the event. (podcast)

Early Saxon graves unearthed in Cambridgeshire

Archaeologists in the English village of Haddenham have uncovered nine burials dating to the Early Saxon period (6th century CE) in the car park of the Three Kings Pub. The graves, of both men and women, contained a wealth of grave goods including a spear and shield and a beaded necklace. (photos)

Anglo-Saxon artifacts discovered near Maidstone

A metal detectorist from Medway History Finders has uncovered a collection of Anglo-Saxon artifacts dating to the 6th century near Maidstone, Kent, England. The hoard, valued at more than UK£40,000, includes silver brooches with red garnets and hairpins. (photos)

Anglo-Saxon tool papers online

On its website, Daegrad Tools of Sheffield, England offers an extensive list of papers on Anglo-Saxon tools. The papers are available for free download in PDF format.

Stonehenge bluestones may have been local

Legend says that the bluestones of Stonehenge were transported from a quarry in Wales to the site on the Salisbury Plain, but a new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science shows that the stones may actually have come from a site only three kilometres from the structure.

Manx returns to the Isle of Man

Manx was once the endangered list. Not the cat - the language. But now a new generation of young people, such as singer Ruth Keggin, is doing its best to breathe new life into the speech of the people of the Isle of Man.

New portraits of Shakespeare revealed

"I subjected the images to fundamental tests of identity and authenticity, and these revealed that we are dealing with true-to-life portraits of Shakespeare, one from his youth, the second from his old age," said Hildegard Hammerschmidt-Hummel about two recently-discovered portraits of William Shakespeare. (photos)