English

BBC Radio 4 presents "Tales Before the Stave"

A thirty-minute podcast from BBC Radio 4 features the story of the Winchester Troper, a seminal musical book created around 1030 CE in Winchester, England.

Arthur legends inspired by Carausius, say experts

A Roman cavalry lance head may prove that the legends of King Arthur were inspired by Roman soldiers and sailors. The contos head, dating to the 3rd century, was discovered in Norfolk County, England.

Database catalogs soldiers' records from Hundred Years War

A new web site provides searchable databases of the detailed service records of 250,000 medieval soldiers, including archers who served with Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

"Soldier in later Medieval England" online database

This web site, created by Dr. Adrian Bell of the ICMA Centre and Professor Anne Curry of the University of Southampton (UK) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, catalogs all known service records for soldiers in the Hundred Years War between 1369 and 1453 CE.

Battle records of English soldiers 1369 to 1453 now online

The detailed service records of 250,000 soldiers who served during the Hundred Years War is now availa le to view online. The website, sponsored by Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), was the brainchild of Anne Curry of the University of Southampton and Dr Adrian Bell of the University of Reading.

Brampton Roman artifacts to be displayed for the first time

An amazing collection of Roman artifacts discovered 50 years ago near Brampton, England, is scheduled to go on display for the first time in late 2009. (video)

Researchers seek identity of 51 beheaded bodies from 10th century England

Archaeologists are continuing to study 51 bodies that were apparently buried naked, with their heads stacked to the side, on a prominent hillside between 890 and 1034 C.E.

4th century silver coins found near Filey, England

Bridlington Quay Detecting Society, a group of amateur treasure hunters in England, has discovered a cache of Roman coins dating to the 4th century. The coins, which have been officially declared treasure, may be purchased by the British Museum. (photo)

Launceston Castle damaged by vandals

Officials at English Heritage are "very angry" over the vandalism of Launceston Castle in Cornwall. The 11th century structure was originally built by William the Conqueror's half-brother in 1075, and largely reconstructed in the 13th century. (video)

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

Rare Anglo-Frisian Solidus coin brings UK£9,000

A rare 9th century Anglo-Frisian Solidus coin found in a field in near Salisbury, England, has brought UK£9,000 at auction. (photo)

British mother and son find US$400,000 treasure

Years of metal detecting have paid off for Mary Hannaby and her son, Michael of Hemel Hempstead, England. The two recently discovered a piece of gold, believed to be part of a reliquary or pendant buried four inches below the surface of a field in Hertfordshire.

Fox-Davies now free online

A staple reference book for SCA heraldry is now available for free download. A Handbook to English Heraldry by Fox-Davies can now be accessed on GoogleBooks.

View Whitehall Roman bathhouse for last time

The community archaeological project at Nether Heyford in Northamptonshire, UK will face a bittersweet milestone on July 12, 2009 when the Roman bathhouse will be able to be viewed for the last time before being re-covered. While that building is being preserved for future study, others, such as the Roman villa, continue to be investigated.

How to cook a porpoise

Richard II's recipe for cooking a porpoise is now available online. The recipe is included in a new digitized version of The Forme of Cury, the 15th century text long used by historians to re-create medieval recipes. (video)

Volunteers find Roman artifacts on first day of dig

An archaeological dig in Lincolnshire, England, which teams professional and volunteers, has led to satisfying results on its first day. Among items found: "Roman coins, flints and walls."

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

Workers puzzled over medieval document found in cabinet drawer

Staff at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario are scratching their heads over the discovery of a mid 13th century legal document found at the bottom of a university filing cabinet.

"World's most complete known witch bottle" found in Greenwich, England

A "witch bottle," constructed according to known recipes from 16th and 17th century England, has been found buried upside-down in Greenwich, England. The bottle contains urine, nail clippings, hair and pins, and is believed to be an anti-witchcraft device.

The riddle of the skulls

Archaeologists in Dorset, England are trying to uncover the mystery of a burial pit full of skulls dating to Roman times. The 45 skulls discovered so far all appear to belong to young men.

3rd century skeletons surprise pond builders

Gardeners digging a pond near Mowmacre, England were surprised to find human remains beneath their shovels. The two skeletons have been dated to 3rd century Roman Britain, and were found along with bits of pottery.

New excavations at Stonehenge may prove site a place of sacred healing

It has been over 40 years since any significant excavation have been done at Stonehenge, but during the spring of 2009, that changed when Timothy Darvill, professor of archaeology at Bournemouth University, and Geoffrey Wainwright, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, headed a new dig in the monument's inner circle.

Experts continue to debate mystery of Sutton Hoo

Archaeologists agree that the person buried at Sutton Hoo in East Anglia at the beginning of the 7th century must have been a king, but opinions differ on which king he was. New studies seem to indicate that the ship burial held Raedwald, King of east Anglia and King of the Britains.

Medieval stained glass inspires mosaic artists

What to do with thousands of fragments of medieval pottery? Make them into a mosaic work of art mirroring a 13th century stained glass window, of course! That is what Emma Biggs and Matthew Colling have done at St Mary’s Church, in Castlegate, England.

2nd century scandal at Vindolanda

Researchers studying the Vindolanda tablets, wooden documents detailing everyday life in Roman Britain, believe that five of the tablets show evidence of graft among public officials. (photo).

15th century Redbook?

While doing research on medieval romance tales, Canadian professor James Weldon made a fascinating discovery: the first women's magazine. The manuscript, known as Biblioteca Nazionale, produced on paper in 1457, is a fascinating collection of recipes and romances aimed at the female reader. (photo)

The cost of Hadrian's Wall

In today's world of astronomical construction costs, what would it cost to build Hadrian's Wall? The British company Carillion thinks it knows.

Ripon limekiln is an "important find"

British archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a 500-year-old limekiln behind Ripon House in Leeds, England. Constructed in the mid-15th century, the kiln is one of the largest medieval structures ever found in England. (photo)

Henry VIII annulment letter revealed

On the 500th anniversary of the coronation of England's King Henry VIII, the Vatican has permitted scholars a look at the letter requesting an annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. The Vatican denies any connection between the two events.

New Stonehenge visitor center is a "go"

The long controversy is over. English Heritage's plan to build a new visitor center and divert a nearby road at Stonehenge has finally been approved. The program will cost an estimated UK£25m.