English

18 million parish records to be published online by ancestry.co.uk

In the mid-16th century, Thomas Cromwell, King Henry VIII's vicar-general, began the collecting of London parish records. Now 18 million of these records will be available on the ancestry.co.uk website.

Land grudge brought about Bosworth treachery

Historians have long held that Richard III was killed at Bosworth field in retribution for his slaying of his nephews, the young, rightful heirs, but new evidence may show a different motive: a decade-old power struggle between Richard and William Stanley.

Lost William Weston letter documents English exploration of North America

Experts at England's Bristol University are excited by the discovery of a "long-lost" letter written by King Henry VII which references the voyage of merchant William Weston to the new World in 1499. (photo)

"Presenting the Roman Frontiers – Communicating the Evidence" at Newcastle University

A group of over 300 international specialists on Roman archaeology met recently at Newcastle University to discuss Roman frontier heritage sites and how they are presented to the public.

UK£138,000 English Heritage.grant saves 14th century chapel

Matthew Saunders, honorary director of The Friends of Friendless Churches in Mundon, England, reports that the organization has received a UK£138,000 grant from English Heritage to preserve St Mary's Church, the medieval chapel of a manor house. (photo)

Hadrian's Wall - a hike worth taking.

When he decided to walk the 84 miles of Hadrian's Wall across northern England, reporter Len Barcousky of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wasn't sure what he was letting himself in for, but the experience left him feeling like a "king of the world."

Volunteers find rare tiles at Woking Palace

More than 100 volunteers recently made an amazing find at Woking Palace, near Old Woking, England: rare tiles, crafted in Valencia, Spain in the late 15th century.

Showing your best side: transparent armor

In an August 2004 web article, Will Segerman, British artist and engineer, discusses his project for his final show for his fine art degree at Sheffield Hallam: two suits of transparent Gothic armor. (photos)

Big Viking hoard in Britain may rewrite the history books

Metal detectorists in England have found a new Viking treasure hoard that is thought to be the most important discovery of this type in 150 years.

BBC's "Tudors" historically inaccurate but addicting says historian

Historians seem to have a love/hate relationship with the Showtime series The Tudors, which has been recently sold to the BBC. Some say it "distorts history for dramatic effect" but has "undoubtedly stimulated interest in British history."

Amateur archaeologists drawn to Vindolanda

For over 200 years, archaeologists have been digging at Vindolanda, the 3rd-4th century Roman fort in the north of England. Now volunteers can try their hand at archaeology -- and still find artifacts. (audio)

Search of the grave of Fulke Greville could solve Shakespeare mystery

A group of parishioners at St. Mary's church in Warwick, England have requested permission to open the tomb of Fulke Greville, a writer and contemporary of Shakespeare, who, some believe, wrote at least some of Shakespeare's plays. They hope that mysterious "boxes" in the grave might contain manuscripts.

Haggis invented by the English

English historian Catherine Brown, whose documentary Made in Scotland aired recently on British television, claims that haggis "was originally an English dish."

Grant will fund dig at Cumbrian abbey

Officials at English Heritage Lottery have announced that the Holm Cultram Abbey in Abbeytown, England has received a grant for UK£48,000 to carry out an extensive at the Cistercian abbey.

Wooden structure precursor of Hadrian's Wall

According to archaeologist Geoff Carter, the stone structure of Hadrian's Wall may not have been the first to cross northern England. Carter believes a wooden wall, spanning 117 km, was built first.

Fountain project reveals medieval treasures in Peterborough

A project to install fountains in Peterborough, England's Cathedral Square has given archaeologists a glimpse of life in the medieval town. "We have found a whole manner of objects, from coins to really chunky old door keys," said city museum archaeologist Ben Robinson.

Dover Castle Great Tower gets "Versace-esque bling"

It took two years and cost UK£2.45m, but English Heritage's project to recreate the opulence of Henry II's England has paid off. A team of experts has restored Dover Castle's Great Tower to its creation in 1179 after the visit of the French king to the shrine of Thomas Becket. (photos)

Hawking bell found by teasure hunter in Derbyshire, England

"I have found quite a lot of treasure items over the years and have a few reference books so as soon as I scraped off the mud I knew it was a hawking bell," said metal detectorist Adam Staples last year when he discovered the 500-year-old bell in a Melbourne, England field. "It's a lovely object."

BBC Radio 4 presents "Tales Before the Stave"

A thirty-minute podcast from BBC Radio 4 features the story of the Winchester Troper, a seminal musical book created around 1030 CE in Winchester, England.

Arthur legends inspired by Carausius, say experts

A Roman cavalry lance head may prove that the legends of King Arthur were inspired by Roman soldiers and sailors. The contos head, dating to the 3rd century, was discovered in Norfolk County, England.

Database catalogs soldiers' records from Hundred Years War

A new web site provides searchable databases of the detailed service records of 250,000 medieval soldiers, including archers who served with Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

"Soldier in later Medieval England" online database

This web site, created by Dr. Adrian Bell of the ICMA Centre and Professor Anne Curry of the University of Southampton (UK) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, catalogs all known service records for soldiers in the Hundred Years War between 1369 and 1453 CE.

Battle records of English soldiers 1369 to 1453 now online

The detailed service records of 250,000 soldiers who served during the Hundred Years War is now availa le to view online. The website, sponsored by Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), was the brainchild of Anne Curry of the University of Southampton and Dr Adrian Bell of the University of Reading.

Brampton Roman artifacts to be displayed for the first time

An amazing collection of Roman artifacts discovered 50 years ago near Brampton, England, is scheduled to go on display for the first time in late 2009. (video)

Researchers seek identity of 51 beheaded bodies from 10th century England

Archaeologists are continuing to study 51 bodies that were apparently buried naked, with their heads stacked to the side, on a prominent hillside between 890 and 1034 C.E.

4th century silver coins found near Filey, England

Bridlington Quay Detecting Society, a group of amateur treasure hunters in England, has discovered a cache of Roman coins dating to the 4th century. The coins, which have been officially declared treasure, may be purchased by the British Museum. (photo)

Launceston Castle damaged by vandals

Officials at English Heritage are "very angry" over the vandalism of Launceston Castle in Cornwall. The 11th century structure was originally built by William the Conqueror's half-brother in 1075, and largely reconstructed in the 13th century. (video)

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

Rare Anglo-Frisian Solidus coin brings UK£9,000

A rare 9th century Anglo-Frisian Solidus coin found in a field in near Salisbury, England, has brought UK£9,000 at auction. (photo)

British mother and son find US$400,000 treasure

Years of metal detecting have paid off for Mary Hannaby and her son, Michael of Hemel Hempstead, England. The two recently discovered a piece of gold, believed to be part of a reliquary or pendant buried four inches below the surface of a field in Hertfordshire.