English

Stamford Bridge helmet found in antique shop

A rusty helmet labeled "Viking Helmet found in the River Derwent at Stamford Bridge by D R Lancaster, May 21, 1950" has been discovered in a Midlands, England antique shop. The helmet has been dated by experts to the 11th century.

"High status" Saxon brooch found in South Oxfordshire

Metal detectorists at a rally in South Oxfordshire have discovered a 6th century Saxon grave yielding a skull and a garnet brooch belonging to some of "high status."

Staffordshire hoard will "reshape understanding of the Dark Ages"

The recent discovery of over 1500 Anglo-Saxon artifacts near Staffordshire, England is having an amazing impact - and not just on the archaeological community. Thousands of everyday citizens are lining up to get a look at the 7th to 8th century treasure, and displaying a new curiosity about their Anglo-Saxon heritage.

Constable of the Tower of London installation ceremony online

On October 7, 2009, General Sir Richard Dannatt was installed as the 159th Constable of the Tower of London. Sir Richard's Installation ceremony is available to view on the Historical Royal Palaces website.

Jousting with Henry VIII

Henry VIII was known for his love of spectacular jousts. Now visitors to the Hampton Court website can share in his favorite pastime by playing Joust for Henry VIII.

Hear Shakespeare's music online

The cast album for the recent production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, starring Audra McDonald and Anne Hathaway, is available to hear online.

Scholars hope to give John Dee a make-over

For centuries, John Dee, royal wizard to Queen Elizabeth I, has gotten a bad rap. Now a group of scholars wants to restore his image by showcasing his accomplishments. The group met in September, 2009 in Cambridge for a two-day conference.

Decapitated skeletons may have been Viking raiders

New studies of the recent discovery of 51 decapitated skeletons found in an old quarry at Ridgeway Hill, near Weymouth, England, may show that the young men were captured Viking raiders who were executed and buried in a mass grave.

Amateur treasure hunter finds 'seven figure' haul of Anglo-Saxon gold

The largest haul of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found has been discovered by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland in Staffordshire, it was revealed recently.

Duct tape holding up Canterbury Cathedral

How can you tell when the economic crisis has reached epic proportions in great Britain? When the marble pillars of Canterbury Cathedral, the seat of the Anglican Church and site of the murder of St. Thomas a Becket, are being held together with duct tape.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.

Visitors invited to view processing of Anglo-Saxon grave finds

Visitors to the town of Sittingbourne, England have a rare opportunity to watch the processing of artifacts from an Anglo-Saxon burial site. (photos and video)

Murder or execution in Venta Icenorum?

"This is an abnormal burial," said archaeologist Will Bowden of the University of Nottingham, about the discovery of a male skeleton, buried with his hands tied behind his back. "It could be that the person was murdered or executed, although this is still a matter of speculation." (photo)

Tudor life at Hampton Court Palace

Dame Alys Katharine of the Midrealm reports that the Hampton Court Palace website includes a series of short videos celebrating Tudor times, cooking, and the life of King Henry VIII.

Kells beauty "in the (crossed) eyes of the creators"

The intricate and precise artwork of the manuscripts of 7th and 8th century England and Ireland, including the Book of Kells, has amazed artists and scholars for centuries. Now paleontologist John Cisne believes he knows how it was done. (photo)

Hadrian's wall cemetery to be excavated

Excavation has begun on "the first systematic excavation of a cemetery on Hadrian's Wall," a Roman cremation cemetery which is part of the World Heritage Site at Birdoswald Fort, Cumbri.

King Arthur I: What might have been

Had he lived, what sort of king would Arthur, oldest son of King Henry VII, have been? An article on PhysOrg.com ponders the question with the help of Dr Steven Gunn, Lecturer in Modern History at Merton College, and one of the editors of Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales: Life, Death and Commemoration.

3D footprint of Colchester Circus proposed

Philip Crummy, director of the Colchester Archaeological Trust, which in 2004 discovered the location of the Colchester, England Roman Circus, reports that a proposal has been created to mark the dimensions of the site with a "three dimensional representation on the site of the circus footprint."

Anglo-Saxon dye and textile bibliography

The Anglo-Saxon Plant-Name Survey (ASPNS) has created a bibliography of sources for Dye and Textile History, including sections for Ancient World Dyes and Pigments and Medieval Dyes and Pigments.

Sites of conquest

A new series of articles in the online BBC History Magazine will cover famous historical sites. The first article looks at ten "places associated with the momentous events of 1066 and its aftermath."

Tudor bells return to Ipswich

Five 500-year-old church bells, believed to be the oldest in England, have been returned to St Lawrence Church, in Ipswich, Suffolk after a UK£100,000 restoration project. The bells had previously not been rung for 20 years due to their poor condition.

Law firm recognizes "historic value" of ancient deeds

John Ward, of the wills and estates planning department at Napthens, in Winckley Square, Preston, England, was delighted to be able to be able to handle a recent find at the law firm: the property deeds establishing poor houses, and property deeds dating to the 1550s.

Canterbury's oak rafters date to Norman times

Restoration work at England's Canterbury Cathedral has uncovered oak roof rafters dating to the time of William the Conqueror. While much of the cathedral's roof has been destroyed and rebuilt over the centuries, some of the 11th century timbers survive.

18 million parish records to be published online by ancestry.co.uk

In the mid-16th century, Thomas Cromwell, King Henry VIII's vicar-general, began the collecting of London parish records. Now 18 million of these records will be available on the ancestry.co.uk website.

Land grudge brought about Bosworth treachery

Historians have long held that Richard III was killed at Bosworth field in retribution for his slaying of his nephews, the young, rightful heirs, but new evidence may show a different motive: a decade-old power struggle between Richard and William Stanley.

Lost William Weston letter documents English exploration of North America

Experts at England's Bristol University are excited by the discovery of a "long-lost" letter written by King Henry VII which references the voyage of merchant William Weston to the new World in 1499. (photo)

"Presenting the Roman Frontiers – Communicating the Evidence" at Newcastle University

A group of over 300 international specialists on Roman archaeology met recently at Newcastle University to discuss Roman frontier heritage sites and how they are presented to the public.

UK£138,000 English Heritage.grant saves 14th century chapel

Matthew Saunders, honorary director of The Friends of Friendless Churches in Mundon, England, reports that the organization has received a UK£138,000 grant from English Heritage to preserve St Mary's Church, the medieval chapel of a manor house. (photo)

Hadrian's Wall - a hike worth taking.

When he decided to walk the 84 miles of Hadrian's Wall across northern England, reporter Len Barcousky of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wasn't sure what he was letting himself in for, but the experience left him feeling like a "king of the world."

Volunteers find rare tiles at Woking Palace

More than 100 volunteers recently made an amazing find at Woking Palace, near Old Woking, England: rare tiles, crafted in Valencia, Spain in the late 15th century.