Waterhouse enchants at Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Those longing for the romance of Arthurian times may want to check out J. W. Waterhouse: Garden of Enchantment, an exhibition of the artist's work at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts through February 7, 2010.

Legacy of Puritan vandals still challenges Canterbury Cathedral

In the 1640s, followers of Oliver Cromwell vandalized Canterbury Cathedral, especially stained glass windows overlooking the tomb of Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince. The decay continues to this day, causing concern to those charged with maintaining the cathedral.

Shakespeare Quartos Archive features digital Hamlet

The Shakespeare Quartos Archive, a website featuring "high-quality reproductions and searchable full text of surviving copies of Shakespeare’s" works, has been launched thanks to a grant JISC in the UK and the National Endowment for the Humanities in the US.

Medievalist Laura Ashe wins Philip Leverhulme Prize

Dr Laura Ashe, a professor in the English Faculty at Oxford University, has been awarded the prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize given to academics under the age of 36 for "contribution to their particular field of study, are recognised at an international level, and whose future contributions are held to be of correspondingly high promise."

Experts suggest alternate site for Battle of Bosworth

For nearly the 500 years since it took place, experts have disputed the location of the Battle of Bosworth which saw the defeat of Richard III. Now a team of historians and archaeologists believe they have found the site.

Fashions of the Mary Rose to go on display

Years after its discovery, the Mary Rose, the famous Tudor warship, continues to excite researchers. The latest items to be displayed show that the 16th century sailor was very conscious of his appearance.

Experts believe software proves Shakespeare collaborated

Sir Brian Vickers, an authority on Shakespeare at the Institute of English Studies at the University of London, is a believer in the theory that the Bard did not write all of his plays alone. Now a software program called Pl@giarism may help his case.

Agincourt redux

The Battle of Agincourt took place on St. Crispin’s Day, October 25, 1415, and the details of the victory of the English over the French has been debated since that time. In a recent article for the New York Times, James Glanz looks at the controversy which continues to this day.

Notes on Agincourt

Agincourt Computing has created a website chronicling the history and literature surrounding the Battle of Agincourt, the 1415 battle between the French and the English near Calais.

Hadrian's Wall: cultural melting pot

Research shows that the Roman guards who occupied Hadrian's Wall came from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, from northern to eastern European. Recently, evidence has shown that a fair number came from the Middle East.

Gaming like it's 1066

1066, an online game produced by the BBC's Channel 4, allows players to recreate the "English vs Vikings" battles of 1066.

Stamford Bridge helmet found in antique shop

A rusty helmet labeled "Viking Helmet found in the River Derwent at Stamford Bridge by D R Lancaster, May 21, 1950" has been discovered in a Midlands, England antique shop. The helmet has been dated by experts to the 11th century.

"High status" Saxon brooch found in South Oxfordshire

Metal detectorists at a rally in South Oxfordshire have discovered a 6th century Saxon grave yielding a skull and a garnet brooch belonging to some of "high status."

Staffordshire hoard will "reshape understanding of the Dark Ages"

The recent discovery of over 1500 Anglo-Saxon artifacts near Staffordshire, England is having an amazing impact - and not just on the archaeological community. Thousands of everyday citizens are lining up to get a look at the 7th to 8th century treasure, and displaying a new curiosity about their Anglo-Saxon heritage.

Constable of the Tower of London installation ceremony online

On October 7, 2009, General Sir Richard Dannatt was installed as the 159th Constable of the Tower of London. Sir Richard's Installation ceremony is available to view on the Historical Royal Palaces website.

Jousting with Henry VIII

Henry VIII was known for his love of spectacular jousts. Now visitors to the Hampton Court website can share in his favorite pastime by playing Joust for Henry VIII.

Hear Shakespeare's music online

The cast album for the recent production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, starring Audra McDonald and Anne Hathaway, is available to hear online.

Scholars hope to give John Dee a make-over

For centuries, John Dee, royal wizard to Queen Elizabeth I, has gotten a bad rap. Now a group of scholars wants to restore his image by showcasing his accomplishments. The group met in September, 2009 in Cambridge for a two-day conference.

Decapitated skeletons may have been Viking raiders

New studies of the recent discovery of 51 decapitated skeletons found in an old quarry at Ridgeway Hill, near Weymouth, England, may show that the young men were captured Viking raiders who were executed and buried in a mass grave.

Amateur treasure hunter finds 'seven figure' haul of Anglo-Saxon gold

The largest haul of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found has been discovered by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland in Staffordshire, it was revealed recently.

Duct tape holding up Canterbury Cathedral

How can you tell when the economic crisis has reached epic proportions in great Britain? When the marble pillars of Canterbury Cathedral, the seat of the Anglican Church and site of the murder of St. Thomas a Becket, are being held together with duct tape.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.

Visitors invited to view processing of Anglo-Saxon grave finds

Visitors to the town of Sittingbourne, England have a rare opportunity to watch the processing of artifacts from an Anglo-Saxon burial site. (photos and video)

Murder or execution in Venta Icenorum?

"This is an abnormal burial," said archaeologist Will Bowden of the University of Nottingham, about the discovery of a male skeleton, buried with his hands tied behind his back. "It could be that the person was murdered or executed, although this is still a matter of speculation." (photo)

Tudor life at Hampton Court Palace

Dame Alys Katharine of the Midrealm reports that the Hampton Court Palace website includes a series of short videos celebrating Tudor times, cooking, and the life of King Henry VIII.

Kells beauty "in the (crossed) eyes of the creators"

The intricate and precise artwork of the manuscripts of 7th and 8th century England and Ireland, including the Book of Kells, has amazed artists and scholars for centuries. Now paleontologist John Cisne believes he knows how it was done. (photo)

Hadrian's wall cemetery to be excavated

Excavation has begun on "the first systematic excavation of a cemetery on Hadrian's Wall," a Roman cremation cemetery which is part of the World Heritage Site at Birdoswald Fort, Cumbri.

King Arthur I: What might have been

Had he lived, what sort of king would Arthur, oldest son of King Henry VII, have been? An article on PhysOrg.com ponders the question with the help of Dr Steven Gunn, Lecturer in Modern History at Merton College, and one of the editors of Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales: Life, Death and Commemoration.

3D footprint of Colchester Circus proposed

Philip Crummy, director of the Colchester Archaeological Trust, which in 2004 discovered the location of the Colchester, England Roman Circus, reports that a proposal has been created to mark the dimensions of the site with a "three dimensional representation on the site of the circus footprint."

Anglo-Saxon dye and textile bibliography

The Anglo-Saxon Plant-Name Survey (ASPNS) has created a bibliography of sources for Dye and Textile History, including sections for Ancient World Dyes and Pigments and Medieval Dyes and Pigments.