English

Keeping current on Stonehenge

It's been a momentous year for experts at Stonehenge, as well as those who visit the Neolithic monument, including the grand opening of its new visitor center. The Culture24 blog offers a wrapup of 2013 for the world Heritage site. (photos, map)

Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources completed

For the last one hundred years, scholars have been digging their way through documents in order to create the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources, "the most comprehensive study ever" of medieval Latin vocabulary. The 16th and final volume of the dictionary was completed in early December 2013.

Structural survey of Barnard's Castle "challenging"

Four years ago, the walls of 12th century Barnard Castle's came tumbling down, but no one has accepted the responsibility for their collapse. Now, with the help of a UK£50,000 grant, a structural survey of the Durham, England site has been scheduled.

The mystery of Longforth Farm continues

In a feature article for Current Archaeology, Matthew Symonds discusses recent discoveries at Longforth Farm with Bob Davis of Wessex Archaeology. Longforth Farm is a huge medieval complex near Wellington, England. (photos, map)

What's correct? Ax Chaucer

African-American dialect has often been criticized for the use of words such as "ax" instead if "ask," but critics may want to check their Chaucer, who used "ax" in his writing. Shereen Marisol Meraji of All Things Considered has the audio story.

Ironrose Candles

Illuminate your Renaissance world with finely scented Shakespearean candles from Ironrose Candles. Their collection, inspired by the Bard, includes classics such as "Perchance to Dream", "Pomander", "Jocund Day", "There's Rosemary" and more.

#Beow100

College students forced to read Beowulf be heartened! Welsh medievalist, Elaine Treharne, has brought social media to medieval Scandinavia with Beowulf in a Hundred Tweets. The work is available on her blog Text Technologies.

British Library adding over a million images to Flickr

The British Library has announced that it will be adding its collections of public domain digital images to Flickr. The first collection set is Highlights from the Mechanical Curator, which includes images from over 65,000 books from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Other collections are also scheduled to be added.

"Stunning" St George and the Dragon painting found in Welsh church

Beneath 20 layers of paint and lime, conservators have recently uncovered "stunning" 15th century wall paintings in the small, 13th century church of St Cadoc's in Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. (video)

King Harold and the roundabout

Traditionally it is believed that King Harald was killed on the spot where Battle Abbey now stands, but new evidence, promoted by Channel 4's Time Team, place his death in the Battle of Hastings at a mini roundabout on the A2100.

Free Shakespeare course offered online

On the Lochac list, Katherine Kerr reported that the University of Warwick and the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust will be offering a free, 10-week, online course entitled Shakespeare and his World.

Celtic coins to remain in Jersey thanks to UK£738,000 government grant

In 2012, Reg Mead and Richard Miles discovered a hoard of 70,000 Celtic coins in a field on the island of Jersey. Now a grant of UK£738,000 will allow the UK£10m treasure to remain on the island.

Mass medieval burial found near Durham Cathedral

Archaeologists are endeavoring to puzzle out the significance of a mass grave discovered during renovation of Durham University's Palace Green library. Instead of defined burials, the remains of 18 individuals seem to have been "tipped" into the grave.

"Grubby, old pot" contains rare coin

For eight years, a grubby, old pot sat in a basement in Rothbury, England. It was not until recently that builder Richard Mason, who found the pot on Lindisfarne, took a second look, discovering a hoard of gold and silver dating to the 16th century.

Might Roman ring have inspired Tolkien?

The history of a stolen Roman ring and its discovery in the 18th century are the subject of a recent feature article in History Today by Lynn Forest-Hill, fellow of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton, theorizing that the ring may have been the inspiration for J.R.R. Tolkien. (photos)

Richard III to be reburied with medieval pomp and ceremony

Reburial of nobles was common practice in the 15th century, so the spirit of Richard III should feel right at home when he is soon reinterred in Leicester Cathedral. Experts have discovered a medieval ceremony of reburial, parts of which will be used in the upcoming service.

Anglo-Saxon game piece found in Kent great hall

Archaeologists excavating the remains of an Anglo-Saxon in Lyminge, Kent have discovered a game piece "made from a hollow piece of bone closed with delicately turned wooden caps, held in place with a bronze pin," part of a high-end backgammon set. (photo)

Leicestershire lead coffin opened

A team of experts from Archaeology Warwickshire and York University have opened the 1,700-year-old lead coffin discovered recently near Hinckley, England, and have begun examination of its contents.

Tudor Monastery Farm on BBC 2

Watchers of BBC 2 may want to catch up on the latest episodes of The Tudor Monastery Farm, where modern experts "work as ordinary farmers under the eye of a monastic landlord, learning to master the landscape away from the farm in order to supplement their income."

Rare Celtic "pillow stone" discovered in North Devon

In 2012, 15-year-old Jack Lawrence discovered an odd stone in the rubble from a wall once part of Shutes Cottage in West Down, England. The stone bears the inscription "Guerngen" and is believed to have been a "pillow stone," placed at the head of a grave.

Plans considered to unearth Roman baths in Exeter

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral in England is consulting with English Heritage about possible plans to make the Roman baths under Cathedral Green more accessible to the public. The baths were first discovered in 1971.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

3D X-ray to reveal secrets of "unreadable" scroll

"Having the chance to unlock a part of Norfolk history which has been closed to us for maybe hundreds of years feels very special," said Gary Tuson, from the Norfolk Records Office about plans to x-ray a 15th century scroll that is too delicate to unroll.

Pre-fire London virtualization wins game company award

Travelers to London are sometimes disappointed to find little of the city's medieval past on tourist maps, thanks to the 17th century fire which destroyed much of the city. Now a team of students offers the next best thing with a virtual "fly-through" of Tudor London.

What's with the snails?

In a blog article for Smithsonian, Colin Schultz wonders why in English manuscripts from the 13th and 14th centuries, knights are always fighting snails. (photos)

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Newborough dig may stall energy construction

Archaeological digs on a farm near Newborough, England have unearthed several layers of history from Roman to Saxon times. The excavations were commissioned before the land could be used for proposed renewable energy parks.

Archaeological forensics not like CSI

The public has learned to expect DNA testing to answer all archaeological questions, but this is not always the case according to Stephanie Pappas, Senior Writer for LiveScience. One good example is the mummified head, long believed to be that of King Henry IV of France, the investigation of which has led experts on a merry chase.

House Book of York on display at Yorkshire Museum

The civic archive of the city of York, England has loaned the 15th century House Book of the city to the Yorkshire Museum until December 2013. The book will be on display for the first time in history. The manuscript details public opinion of King Richard III.

Weapons stolen from British re-enactor

History buff and medieval re-enactor Michael St Omer of Hadlow, England is devastated by the recent theft of swords, archery gear and other equipment from his parents' garage. "I can replace the weapons but they were the first ones I ever had and they meant a lot to me," he said.