English

Sutton Hoo brooch replica added to exhibit

In the 1840s, a ploughman in Suffolk, England discovered what remained of an Anglo-Saxon gold brooch, and traded it for a set of teaspoons. Recently, as part of the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial, a replica of the brooch, complete with gold, silver, bone and garnet stones, has been included in the exhibit. (photo)

What killed Richard III?

A new report, published in The Lancet, reveals that King Richard III was "probably killed by two blows to the head during a 'sustained attack'" when he perished August 22, 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth. (photos)

The diet of a king

The discovery of the remains of Richard III has given the scientific community an unparalleled glimpse into royal lifestyles in the Middle Ages. The latest published research involves the diet and drinking habits of the 15th century monarch.

Mysterious "pierced pottery" among the finds at Bridge Farm

Archaeological excavations at the Romano-British settlement at Bridge Farm, near Barcombe Mills, England have given experts much to ponder, including evidence of a large post-built building, coins and late Roman pottery with pierced bases.

Richard III to be buried March 26, 2015

After much debate, court rulings, and fuss, the remains of King Richard III, England's latest medieval monarch, will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral on March 26, 2015.

Barrow Clump provides "good year" for archaeologists

Barrow Clump on the Salisbury Plain in England was a burial site from neolithic through Anglo-Saxon times, so archaeologists were not surprised to find additional burials there, but new discoveries produced a wealth of artifacts including shield bosses, glass beads and a Saxon sword. (photos)

"Tally-ho" seal brings smiles in Lufton

Lufton, England has been the site of settlement from the Iron Age to the present, but archaeologists working on the Roman era of the town were amused to discover a wax seal from the Middle Ages, decorated with a light-hearted hunting scene. (photo)

SCA Playwright's "To Each Their Own" released in audio production

Sir Brand deus Leons of An Tir wrote a Shakespearean-style comedic play, "To Each Their Own". The play, reviously published in script form, has been commercially produced and released in audio form.

New documents added to British Library's digitalization project

The British Library reports that it has released its latest list of digitized documents for summer 2014.

Volunteers excavate Sherwood Forest

According to legend, Robin Hood married Maid Marian in Edwinstowe, a village near the Major Oak, the legendary shelter for the outlaw and his band of Merry Men. Now volunteers are helping to excavate the area looking for Sherwood Forest's medieval past.

Elizabeth's "pirate" ship raised from floor of the Thames

After 400 years, a ship, believed to be the Cherabin, will be celebrated once again in England. The "state pirate ship," sponsored by Queen Elizabeth I, has been raised from the floor of the Thames estuary to find a new home in the National Dive Centre in Stoney Cove, Leicestershire. (photos)

Medieval treasures among books of auctioned library

Heywood Bright, liberal British politician, was a collector of rare books. Recently his library, including several previously unknown or incomplete medieval treasures, was auctioned by Christie's.

Roman intaglio re-used by medieval jeweler

Metal detectorist Philip Jackson made a rare and interesting find recently when his equipment pinpointed a silver pendant in a South Derbyshire field constructed around a Roman intaglio (a carved stone). (photo)

New Richard III exhibit sparks outcry

Historians and Richard III experts are outraged over an exhibit in the new Richard III Visitor Centre in Leicester, England which features the armor of the warrior king painted white, making him look like a "Star Wars stormtrooper." (photos, video)

Volunteers help find site of 13th century hospital

For three years, archaeologists have been looking for signs of a medieval hospital in Northumberland Park in Tyneside, England. 80 medieval burials have been found, and, in the last few days of the dig, a floor of glazed tiles, probably from the hospital's chapel. (photos)

Was the Black Prince really so evil?

British school children all know about the evil Black Prince Edward of Woodstock, who put to death 3,000 innocents after the siege of the French town of Limoges in September 1370. But the discovery of a letter written by Edward may change his image forever.

Medieval linen found in Northampton tanning tanks

Several scraps of linen dating to the Middle Ages have been found at the base of a timber and stone-lined tanks, believed to have been used for tanning, in the St John's Street excavation in Northampton, England. (photos)

A new England - "all very much Game of Thrones"

In a recent article for BBC Magazine, sociologist, writer and performer Tom Shakespeare ponders what would happen if Scotland were to achieve its independence and the England left behind broke up into its original seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

Richard III descendant to craft king's coffin

In 2013, when experts believed they had discovered the remains of King Richard III, they turned to Michael Ibsen, a 17th generation relation of the monarch for DNA testing. Now Ibsen has been tapped for service again - as the builder of the royal coffin.

English extend funds for 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta

2015 will be a big year for Magna Carta enthusiasts, marking the 800th anniversary of the document. Recently ten organizations were awarded funds to help with commemorations of the event.

Exeter's unique medieval water system

Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter by Mark Stoyle, a new book published by the University of Exeter Press, looks at the complex water supply system, dating to the 14th century, that once served the medieval city and now still exists beneath its streets.

Burial discovery sheds light on late Roman Britain

The discovery of five skeletons dating to Roman times near a villa in Dorset, England has led archaeologists to postulate that they were from the same family. This is the first incidence of Roman families buried together near where they lived.

Protecting Ashby St Ledgers

Tiny, deserted, medieval villages across the English landscape have been disappearing, moving English Heritage to recommend historical designation to preserve what is left. Now the government of Northamptonshire is taking action by proclaiming such villages "scheduled monuments."

Roman and Iron Age coins found together in Derbyshire cave

1st century Roman coins and coins from Iron Age tribes should not be found together, but that is excatly what happened recently when a local found the treasure buried in a Derbyshire, England cave. (photo)

Newcastle renovation reveals medieval secrets

The development of a new commercial district in Newcastle, England has sparked interest in the medieval quayside life of the city, an area reclaimed from the River Tyne by the year 1400. Excavations have already uncovered a substantial sandstone wall and green-glazed pottery.

Conservation plan for Battle of Northampton site approved

"This year we are celebrating the rich and interesting story of Northampton and our nation. So it seems only fitting that we are looking carefully at how we can protect the site of one of the most significant battles fought on English soil," said Tim Hadland of the Northampton Borough Council about plans to preserve the Battle of Northampton site.

Re-enactors endanger Battle of Hastings site

Regular re-enactments of the Battle of Hastings witnessed by hordes of spectators may be endangering the archaeology of the historic site, but work by a team from the University of Huddersfield, led by Dr. Glenn Foard, is working to discover genuine artifacts from the battlefield.

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

People have long admired the beautiful Anglo-Saxon artifacts found in the burial mounds of Sutton Hoo, but few understand the symbols embedded within the metal. Rosie Weetch, a curator at the British Museum, offers an illuminating primer on how to decode the symbols and stories in a piece of Anglo-Saxon metalwork on the British Museum blog. (photos and diagrams)

Rare Ethelbert penny found in Sussex field

King Ethelbert II was murdered, possibly for minting his own coins. Now an extremely-rare, 8th century silver penny, found by metal detectorist Darrin Simpson, has been discovered in a Sussex, England field. (photo)

Remains of Black Shuck found in ruins of Leiston Abbey?

An old legend in Suffolk, England, tells of a massive black dog, known as Black Shuck, which terrorized the village folk, and was the subject of a report in 1577 by the Reverend Abraham Fleming. Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a huge dog buried in the area. (photo)