English

French museum hosts Shakespearean costume exhibit

The National Centre for Stage Costumes in Moulins, France is playing host to an elaborate display of Shakespearean theatrical costumes entitled Shakespeare, l'étoffe du monde. The silk, satin and gemstone-studded costumes reflect designs from over a century of productions.

"From heads to tails" change in fish trade in 13th century London

New research by archaeologists from UCL, Cambridge and UCLan shows that there was a sudden switch in the fish trade in London from local supplies to imported during the early 13th century. The paper, Fish for the city: meta-analysis of archaeological cod remains and the growth of London's northern trade, appears in the June 2014 issue of Antiquities Journal.

Richard's spine shows evidence of scoliosis

Readers of Shakespeare's Richard III know that the medieval king was a hunchback, but a new study of the king's remains shows that Richard actually suffered from scoliosis.

New discoveries at Roman Maryport

Experts and volunteers from Oxford Archaeology have discovered what they believe is a "lost" Roman harbor along with a Roman fort at Maryport, on the west coast of Cumbria in England. The archaeological project hopes to "build up a picture of what ordinary life was like" in this part of Roman Britain.

New BM digitization includes medieval "comic book"

Among over 1000 new manuscripts placed online by the British Museum is The Guthlac Roll, a history of St. Guthlac told in graphic novel style "using a series of images in roundels with labels." Mark Strauss of i09 offers his views on the manuscript.

Enjoy Hampton Court - online

Are you an admirer ot London's Hampton Court Palace? If so, you will want to visit the website of Historic Royal Palaces and view a large gallery of photos of Henry VIII's residence.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Human remains mark Saxon settlement near London

Gardeners working at a private home in Purley, England near London, were surprised to unearth a skull and thigh bone dating to the 7th of 8th century. The remains are believed by experts to be Saxon, and are considered a "significant archaeological discovery."

Norfolk "Q-tip" declared treasure

Everyday toilet implements, such as an ear scoop found by a metal detectorist, were among the recently-declared treasures in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Also discussed was an early Anglo-Saxon "gold and garnet cloisonné circular domed object." (photos)

The evolution of London

How did London evolve as a city from Roman times to the present? Researchers at UCL's Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis know the answer and privdes a visual aid in the form of a map which shows the city's development from the 1st century military center to today's megacity.

Late medieval history course online

For those interested in furthering their knowledge of medieval English history, a team of scholars from the University of Leicester is offering a free, online course entitled England in the time of King Richard III.

York tomb remains show long history of religious use

Archaeologists working at All Saints Church in York, England have discovered skeletons of individuals dating back at least 1100 years. Remains included that of a pregnant woman and her fetus and three men shoved together in the tomb. (photos)

The potency of Shakespeare's potions

It's Shakespeare's 450th birthday. In a feature article for the BBC's Future, Claudia Hammond looks at whether the poisons mentioned in William Shakespeare's plays, such as Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, could actually work.

Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality

Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality is a historical fiction novel that takes in England and Wales when the Black Death - or the Great Mortality as it was then known - first arrives. The main character, Thomas de Parr, is the youngest son of a nobleman and is destined to become a monk at Tintern Abbey.

Black plague: Survival of the fittest

A new study by University of South Carolina anthropologist Sharon DeWitte shows that those who survived Europe's 14th century Black Plague "lived significantly longer and were healthier than people who lived before the epidemic struck in 1347."

Historical Fiction Novel

Please check out a new historical fiction novel by Thomas F. Schultz titled: Faith, Hope, or the Great Mortality.  The title is available on Amazon and for Kindle.

"Only individual ever recorded related to the Norman invasion" found in East Sussex

Skeleton 180 might be a very remarkable individual: the only person recorded related to the Norman invasion of England. Buried in a medieval cemetery, 180 was believed to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, but scientists have now placed his death around 1066.

Thamesreach celebrates Tudor Day

Members of the SCA Shire of Thamesreach recently took part in a celebration of Tudor Day at the Queens Elisabeth Hunting lodge in Epping Forest, England. Photographer PQNeiman was on hand to capture images of the day.

Shakespeare and the Scientific Revolution

Readers of Shakespeare's works could easily dismiss his interest in science at a time when the Scientific Revolution was happening around him, but author Dan Falk believes that the Bard was well aware of the developments.

Medieval theory of multiple universes?

According to Tom Mcleish, Giles Gasper and Hannah Smithson for an article in The Conversation, 13th century Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Grosseteste, was one of the most dazzling minds of his generation (1170 to 1253) and may have caught onto the modern notion of multiple universes.

Storks return to Thrigby Hall

In the Middle Ages, it was common to see white storks, which breed in continental Europe and migrate to Africa in the winter, nesting in the chimneys of England, but no stork has done so for 600 years - until now. (photo, video)

"Incredibly significant" bishop's seal declared treasure

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Falconer has found a few artifacts over the years but nothing like the 14th century, silver bishop's seal, called "incredibly significant" by Manx National Heritage, he found recently in a field on the Isle of Man. (photo)

Quatrefoil stone helps trace history of Codnor Castle

Codnor Castle, a 13th century stone keep and bailey fortress, is a fragile ruin in Derbyshire, England about which little is known, but the discovery of a 13th century stone quatrefoil may help experts learn more about the structure.

Wark Castle vanguard of Flodden 500 project

The Battle of Flodden, between the Scottish and English kings, took place in 1513. Now the battle is being commemorated by experts and volunteers for the Flodden 500 Archaeological project. The focus for 2014 will be Wark Castle on the Northumberland side of the River Tweed.

London church with Shakespeare connection sought

St Leonard's church in Shoreditch, England, best known as the backdrop for the hit BBC series Rev, is believed to have been the site of the medieval church where Shakespeare worshiped. Now archaeologists plan to investigate the area in search of the original building.

New books of poetry at Project Gutenberg

A text copy of all 3 volumes of Thomas Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry was recently posted to Project Gutenberg. These books contain a great deal of poetry in middle and early modern English.

Hadrian's Wall Trust is no more

Over the next six months, the Hadrian's Wall Trust, the charity that maintains the famous Roman wall crossing northern England, will be closed due to "significant financial constraints." In the future, the wall will be maintained by English Heritage and local authorities.

Learning from the teeth of the dead

"It's fantastic we can look in such detail at an individual who died 600 years ago," said Don Walker, an osteologist with the Museum of London about his recent work on remains found last year under London's Charterhouse Square. A study of the teeth has revealed that at least 12 of the skeletons died in the 14th century of the Black Death. (photos)

45,000 English surnames now in database

The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funded Family Names of the United Kingdom Project has completed its first phase with 45,000 surnames, from the 11th to 19th centuries, researched and explained.

The Great Audley's mourning ring found in Norfolk

In his will, Hugh Audley, known as The Great Audley, 16th century philosopher, land owner and money lender - and owner of the land where Buckingham Palace now stands - left 11 mourning rings, designed to be worn by his mourners. Such a ring, linked to him, has been discovered in a south Norfolk field. (photo)