English

English extend funds for 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta

2015 will be a big year for Magna Carta enthusiasts, marking the 800th anniversary of the document. Recently ten organizations were awarded funds to help with commemorations of the event.

Exeter's unique medieval water system

Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter by Mark Stoyle, a new book published by the University of Exeter Press, looks at the complex water supply system, dating to the 14th century, that once served the medieval city and now still exists beneath its streets.

Burial discovery sheds light on late Roman Britain

The discovery of five skeletons dating to Roman times near a villa in Dorset, England has led archaeologists to postulate that they were from the same family. This is the first incidence of Roman families buried together near where they lived.

Protecting Ashby St Ledgers

Tiny, deserted, medieval villages across the English landscape have been disappearing, moving English Heritage to recommend historical designation to preserve what is left. Now the government of Northamptonshire is taking action by proclaiming such villages "scheduled monuments."

Roman and Iron Age coins found together in Derbyshire cave

1st century Roman coins and coins from Iron Age tribes should not be found together, but that is excatly what happened recently when a local found the treasure buried in a Derbyshire, England cave. (photo)

Newcastle renovation reveals medieval secrets

The development of a new commercial district in Newcastle, England has sparked interest in the medieval quayside life of the city, an area reclaimed from the River Tyne by the year 1400. Excavations have already uncovered a substantial sandstone wall and green-glazed pottery.

Conservation plan for Battle of Northampton site approved

"This year we are celebrating the rich and interesting story of Northampton and our nation. So it seems only fitting that we are looking carefully at how we can protect the site of one of the most significant battles fought on English soil," said Tim Hadland of the Northampton Borough Council about plans to preserve the Battle of Northampton site.

Re-enactors endanger Battle of Hastings site

Regular re-enactments of the Battle of Hastings witnessed by hordes of spectators may be endangering the archaeology of the historic site, but work by a team from the University of Huddersfield, led by Dr. Glenn Foard, is working to discover genuine artifacts from the battlefield.

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

People have long admired the beautiful Anglo-Saxon artifacts found in the burial mounds of Sutton Hoo, but few understand the symbols embedded within the metal. Rosie Weetch, a curator at the British Museum, offers an illuminating primer on how to decode the symbols and stories in a piece of Anglo-Saxon metalwork on the British Museum blog. (photos and diagrams)

Rare Ethelbert penny found in Sussex field

King Ethelbert II was murdered, possibly for minting his own coins. Now an extremely-rare, 8th century silver penny, found by metal detectorist Darrin Simpson, has been discovered in a Sussex, England field. (photo)

Remains of Black Shuck found in ruins of Leiston Abbey?

An old legend in Suffolk, England, tells of a massive black dog, known as Black Shuck, which terrorized the village folk, and was the subject of a report in 1577 by the Reverend Abraham Fleming. Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a huge dog buried in the area. (photo)

Lincoln Castle reveals Saxon buried in his boots

The UK£22 million renovtion of Lincoln Castle continues to unearth medieval treasures, this time with the discovery of a high-status Saxon burial  in a church wall. The remains showed a powerful man, suffering from rickets, who was buried in his boots.

Vindolanda Nero coin "a special find"

Archaeologists working at Vindolanda, the Roman fort in northeastern England, made a "special" find recently: a rare gold coin bearing the image of Roman emperor Nero, the first gold coin found during the excavation's 40-year history. (photo)

"Holy Grail" stolen in Wales

The Nanteos Cup is missing. Rumored to be the Holy Grail, brought to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, the olive wood cup is normally kept in a bank vault in Wales, but was loaned to an ailing women in Weston-Under-Penyard. It was stolen from her home July 14, 2014. (photo)

Newstead Abbey to receive grant from World Monuments Fund

In 1540, the Byron family, ancestors of the famous Lord Byron, was given Newstead Abbey near Nottingham, England. Built in the 12th century, the abbey has since fallen into disrepair, and it has become the recipient of UK£40,000 from the World Monuments Fund to save the crumbling structure.

Mystery of Wolsey's missing angels solved

Once upon a time, four bronze angels adorned the gateposts of the Wellingborough Golf Club in Northamptonshire, England. No one paid much attention to them until two were stolen, but now all four, identified as Renaissance treasures, are the subject of a fundraising effort by the Victoria and Albert Museum. (photo)

Viking sword has colorful history

Auctioneers at Christie's have announced that they will offer for auction a double-edged Viking sword associated with the battles of Hastings, Stamford Bridge and Bannockburn. The sword is expected to bring between UK£80,000 to £120,000. (photo)

Securing the precious Magna Carta

Chris Woods, director of the  British National Conservation Service, has a daunting task: to assure the safety of the precious Lincoln Magna Carta during its tour through the United States in 2014.

An end to the Bayeux Tapestry

Professor Robert Bartlett of the University of St. Andrews believes that there should be a better ending to the reknowned Bayeux Tapestry than the death of King Harold and the defeat of his army. Now a community project from the British island of Alderney offers an alternative: the coronation of William the Conqueror. (photos)

French museum hosts Shakespearean costume exhibit

The National Centre for Stage Costumes in Moulins, France is playing host to an elaborate display of Shakespearean theatrical costumes entitled Shakespeare, l'étoffe du monde. The silk, satin and gemstone-studded costumes reflect designs from over a century of productions.

"From heads to tails" change in fish trade in 13th century London

New research by archaeologists from UCL, Cambridge and UCLan shows that there was a sudden switch in the fish trade in London from local supplies to imported during the early 13th century. The paper, Fish for the city: meta-analysis of archaeological cod remains and the growth of London's northern trade, appears in the June 2014 issue of Antiquities Journal.

Richard's spine shows evidence of scoliosis

Readers of Shakespeare's Richard III know that the medieval king was a hunchback, but a new study of the king's remains shows that Richard actually suffered from scoliosis.

New discoveries at Roman Maryport

Experts and volunteers from Oxford Archaeology have discovered what they believe is a "lost" Roman harbor along with a Roman fort at Maryport, on the west coast of Cumbria in England. The archaeological project hopes to "build up a picture of what ordinary life was like" in this part of Roman Britain.

New BM digitization includes medieval "comic book"

Among over 1000 new manuscripts placed online by the British Museum is The Guthlac Roll, a history of St. Guthlac told in graphic novel style "using a series of images in roundels with labels." Mark Strauss of i09 offers his views on the manuscript.

Enjoy Hampton Court - online

Are you an admirer ot London's Hampton Court Palace? If so, you will want to visit the website of Historic Royal Palaces and view a large gallery of photos of Henry VIII's residence.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Human remains mark Saxon settlement near London

Gardeners working at a private home in Purley, England near London, were surprised to unearth a skull and thigh bone dating to the 7th of 8th century. The remains are believed by experts to be Saxon, and are considered a "significant archaeological discovery."

Norfolk "Q-tip" declared treasure

Everyday toilet implements, such as an ear scoop found by a metal detectorist, were among the recently-declared treasures in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Also discussed was an early Anglo-Saxon "gold and garnet cloisonné circular domed object." (photos)

The evolution of London

How did London evolve as a city from Roman times to the present? Researchers at UCL's Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis know the answer and privdes a visual aid in the form of a map which shows the city's development from the 1st century military center to today's megacity.

Late medieval history course online

For those interested in furthering their knowledge of medieval English history, a team of scholars from the University of Leicester is offering a free, online course entitled England in the time of King Richard III.