English

Customary Law Before the Conquest

How were disputes settled in Anglo-Saxon England? Implications suggest there was a common law, but "...where had it come from and how had it developed?"

Volcanoes key to "Little Ice Age"

A new study, led by Gifford Miller at the University of Colorado at Boulder, US, may show that a series of volcanic eruptions around 1300 may have led to the Little Ice Age, which dropped temperatures in Europe in the 1500s.

Anglo-Saxon tools for the re-enactor

Daegrad Tools in Sheffield, England offers a wide range of Anglo-Saxon tools and equipment, extensively researched, including knives, tools and crafting items such as spindles and looms. The website features close-ups of the tools.

Lincolnshire hobbyist strikes gold with silver seal matrix

Metal detctore hobbyist Devin Warmsley had a great day December 7, 2011 when he discovered a 14th century silver gilt seal-matrix worth between UK£5,000 and UK£20,000, according to the British Museum. (photo).

U.S. Magna Carta to return to display

On February 17, 2012, the only medieval copy of the Magna Carta in the United States will return to display in the National Archives. The copy was purchased by philanthropist David Rubenstein in 2007 and is on long-term loan at the museum.

"Best preserved medieval timber barn in England" bought by English Heritage

English Heritage has purchased Harmondsworth Barn, the "Cathedral of Middlesex," for UK£20,000. The barn, originally used for storing grain, "resembles the nave of a large church." It was built in 1426. (photo)

Roman kiln found in North Yorkshire

Plans for the new kitchen and classrom space are on hold at Norton primary school in North Yorkshire, England due to the discovery of a Roman kiln, complete with pottery fragments.

Sports scientists to look for archers aboard the Mary Rose

Sports physiologists are examining the skeletons found on the Mary Rose, an English ship that sank in 1545. They are looking for stress injuries and other markers that would indicate which skeletons were professional archers.

Re-enactor with spear bashes bad guys

Rochdale, England pub manager and re-enactor Neil Ashton never expected to enlist his medieval skills to defend his home until two robbers climbed in a window, causing Ashton to reach for the nearest weapon, his six-foot spear.

Medieval healing spring to be excavated

St. Ann's Well, a medieval healing spring in Nottingham, England, has been scheduled to be excavated sometime in 2012. The site, under a demolished pub, was once believed to have magical healing powers.

Beheaded skeletons might be victims of royal decree

Dr Britt Baillie, from the University of Cambridge, believes that 54 skeletons discovered in 2009 at Ridgeway Hill in England were Viking mercenaries from the time of Aethelred the Unready. All remains were found beheaded "in an unusual fashion from the front."

Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Bath

Believed to date from 270 CE, more than 30,000 Roman coins were found in 2007 in Bath, England.

Exquisite 17th-Century Farmer's Library

Townend, home to the Brownes from the 1520s until 1943, maintains an exquisite collection of more than 170 books from the 1600s, with a few dating to the mid-1500s. What were those farmers reading?

The sound of Shakespeare's English

A new British Library recording offers scenes from Shakespeare spoken in a reconstruction of the Elizabethan accent. NPR's Weekend Edition interviewed Ben Crystal, who directed and acted in the project.

Rare Panels from Henry VIII's Nonsuch Palace

Two canvas panels, presumably commissioned for Henry VIII's Nonsuch Palace, are displayed in renovated condition.

New Discoveries inside York Minster

Recent excavation for a "lift" inside York Minster has turned up the remains of 50 bodies in a charnel pit that probably dates back to the 12th century.

Walking Roman London

Visitors to London may be interested in the Secret City Tour, a walking tour of London's Roman past, including the remains of the Roman fort and Roman city wall, built around 200 CE.

East Kingdom to host Anglo Saxon Coronation

Baron Steffan ap Kennydd of Silverwing, of the East Kingdom, reports that the April 14, 2012 Coronation of Kenric and Avelina will feature an authentic Anglo-Saxon ceremony.

Iron age bog man gets his head examined

Worsely Man, the 1st century CE skull of a man found in an English bog in 1958, has been sent to Manchester Children's Hospital for a CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scan.

Found! Jane Seymour's Letter Informing King Henry of Newborn Son

Written in 1543, the letter from Jane Seymour to King Henry VIII, informing him of the birth of Prince Edward, had been carefully stored on a shelf at the Dunham Massey estate, but no one knew it was there.

Portable Antiquities Scheme offers registry of British "treasures"

Metal detector hobbyists and amateur archaeologists in Great Britain are encouraged to record their discoveries of objects over 300 years old on the Portable Antiquities Scheme website, which also provides news and articles on British archaeological finds.

Lynn Museum acquires Roman fertility pendant

A grant has allowed the Lynn Museum near Norfolk, England to purchase a solid gold Roman pendant crafted in the shape of a phallus. The rare find, in excellent condition, was discovered last year by a metal detectorist. (photo - PG-13)

Peterborough home of Roman "rich and famous"

A farm in Itter Crescent, outside Peterborough, England, has held a secret for nearly 2,000 years, a secret revealed by the recent discovery of "a substantial, two-floor courtyard limestone Roman villa with rooms floored with mosaic on the sides of a cobbled courtyard," on the site.

Shakespeare's grammar key to his prominence

Dr. Jonathan Hope believes that the key to William Shakespeare's success was not the words that he used, but the way in which he used them. In a chapter in his new book on the English language, Hope finds that the Bard's grammar and word ordering are what set him apart from other writers.

British library offers eBooks for iPhones

iPhone and iPad users may spend a chill, winter day curled up with a Shakespeare first folio, a Medieval Beastiary, or Sultan Baybars’ Qur’an. The eBook editions are available for download on eTeasures.com.

The economics of Viking raiding

For those who want to mix economics with blood and gore, Mary Valante has posted a paper presented at the Fourth Annual Appalachian Spring Conference in World History and Economics (2009).

Will linguistic research pinpoint 9th century battlefield?

Keith Briggs, a visiting research fellow in linguistics at the University of the West of England, believes he has discovered Hægelisdun, the site of the 869 CE battle between the East Anglians and the Vikings which led to the death of St Edmund. His research involves the use of linguistics.

York Mystery Plays to Be on Internet

As part of the York 800 celebrations, the York Mystery Plays will be streamed live on the Internet during the weekend of August 11 and 12. (Yes, it's the last weekend of Pennsic.)  The plays will be set in the Museum Gardens with the ruins of St. Mary's Abbey as their backdrop.  They were last performed in 1988.

Tales and Ceremonies at the Tower of London

Go behind the scenes at the Tower of London. Learn about the "Oldest Ceremony in the World"; read about the "bribe" ships pay to traverse the Thames; see photos of the graffiti carved into the very stones of the cells of the Tower!

Touring Hampton Court Palace

Historic Royal Palaces has a YouTube site which includes a video for school children who will be visiting Hampton Court Palace.