English

Archaeologists hope to find Roman suburb in Northampton

Archaeologists in Northampton, England are set to excavate a site that may reveal 1,000 years of local history, from the Iron Age through the end of the Roman period. They believe the site might have been a suburb of the Roman city of Duston.

Elizabethan medal illustrates explorers' influence

In a YouTube video, Neil MacGregor discusses a small silver medal commorating the 1577-80 around-the-world voyage of Sir Francis Drake. The video is part of the BBC program entitled Shakespeare's Restless World.(video)

12th century relics found at site of Eynsham Abbey

Contractors for a housing development at Abbey Farm in Eynsham, England, always expected to discover archaeological artifacts, but they were nonetheless surprised to find extensive remains relating to the 12th century Eynsham Abbey.

Tudor costumes and weapons stolen from Northampton re-enactor

The education of school children in Northampton, England will be poorer after the theft of a van containing costumes and equipment belonging to re-enactor Steve Parish. Parish, who runs Past Alive, teaches children about English history.

"King size" bed returns to Ware, England

Since 1931, the Great Bed of Ware has been a beloved feature of the Victoria and Albert Museum. The three metres wide bed was built in 1590 by Hertfordshire carpenter Jonas Fosbrooke. (photo)

Map corrections may help solve mystery of missing colonists

Theories about the fate of the "Lost Colony", a group of English colonists who founded a settlement in coastal North Carolina (USA), have ranged from disease to alien abduction. New evidence found on an English map may finally answer the question.

Pyramus and Thisbe, Beatle-style

In celebration of Shakespeare's 400th birthday, the Beatles perform the Pyramus and Thisbe play from A Midsummer Night's Dream. The 1964 performance is from a DVD called The Beatles Explosion.

Cataloging Elizabethan drunks

Drunkenness in Elizabethan England was not a rare occurance, to the extent, in fact, that satirist Thomas Nashe cataloged eight specific types. The website Lists of Note published Nashe's piece Eight Kindes of Drunkennes.

UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant may bring fame to Epiacum

Many travelers to England are familiar with the country's famous Roman forts, but Elaine Edgar is hoping that a UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant will help bring fame and visitors to a lesser-known site, Epiacum.

Saxon glass industry at Glastonbury Abbey

A researcher examining excavation reports from Glastonbury Abbey has found that the glass fragments and glassmaking remains found there date to the 680's, much earlier than previously thought.

"Disgusting attack" on York's medieval hospital appalls local police

"This is a disgusting attack on York's heritage and those responsible should be deeply ashamed," said a North Yorkshire Police spokesman about recent graffiti inscribed on the ruins of York's 12th century St Leonard's Hospital. (photo)

Cathedrals: "our greatest architectural glories”

In a recent article and podcast for BBC News Magazine, David Cannadine "looks at a selection of the world's cathedrals and the important contribution that they have made to the broader lives of their respective cities and countries."

St. Johns skeletons prove to be Vikings

In 2008, 37 skeletons were discovered buried at St John's College in Oxford, England. Once believed to have been victoms of the 1002 St Brice's Day Massacre, the remains are now believed to be Viking raiders.

Horseback archery encouraged at British mosque

One of the last things one might expect to find at a mosque would be archery practice, but for members of Woking, England's Shah Jahan Mosque, archery is not only tolerated, but encouraged.

Illuminated treasures from the British Library on YouTube

In a six-part video series available on YouTube, Dr Janina Ramirez "unlocks the secrets of illuminated manuscripts that were custom-made for kings and explores the medieval world they reveal."

English Brick Coloration: 1500-1650

A study of patterned bricks shows that not all English buildings were of one color. Exteriors and interiors used limewashes as well as different colors of bricks (or even glazed bricks!) to enliven the surface.

13th-Century Food Fights Helped Fuel the Magna Carta

The recent loan and display of a 1297 copy of the Magna Carta at the National Achives allows careful readers to note how food security and free trade prompted English Barons to negotiate with King John.

In Northumberland, moles assist in archaeology

In Northumberland, England, volunteers are sifting through mole hills looking for artifacts from Epiacum, a Roman fort 12 miles south of Hadrian's wall.

Post-punk band goes medieval in new album

Sumer Is Icumen In is believed to be the oldest known song in the English language. Now the post-punk band, The Futureheads, is giving the song new life when it is included in their a cappella album Rant, to be released in April 2012.

Bouncy Stonehenge is fun for Druids and kids alike

A giant inflatable replica of Stonehenge is making waves in Glasgow, Scotland. The attraction is part of the Glasgow International art festival.

And the horse he rode in on...

Mildenhall Museum in Suffolk, England is expanding to accommodate a new exhibit, the remains of an Anglo-Saxon warrior and the horse he rode in on - or at least with which he was buried - complete with bridle, sword and shield. (photo)

All the Queen's eels

For centuries the people of Gloucester, England, have sent a lamprey pie to the reigning royals in celebrations of important occasions. Due to declining numbers, the pie for the Queen's Diamond jubilee will be made from imported lampreys.

A day in the life of a beefeater

John Keohane recently retired as the Chief Yeoman Warder, or Beefeater, of the Tower of London. In a short clip from the documentary On the Road With The Chief Beefeater, Matthew Stadlen discusses the dress uniform. (video)

Cupid reigns at the Bodleian

The magic of Valentine's Day was felt recently at the Bodleian Library In Oxford, England with an exhibition celebrating "the stories of medieval romance and how they have influenced culture, literature and art over the last thousand years."

Four sisters to break Durham guilds' ban on women

"It is something we value and respect and feel honoured and proud to be among the first women freemen to be sworn in," said Karen Crawford about her acceptance into the City of Durham (England) Freemen's ancient craft guilds, a 700-year-old tradition that up until now banned women.

Anglo-Saxon ironwork reference paper online

In 1995, Patrick Ottaway wrote a paper based on his PhD thesis for York University entitled Anglo Saxon Ironwork. The paper is available in PDF format on the PJO Archaeology website.

Coronation Ordo of Kenric & Avelina, King & Queen of the East

The Coronation of TRM Kenric and Avelina, King and Queen of the East, was held on April 14, AS 46 (2012). The ceremony was an experiment in presenting as authentic a coronation as could be managed within the restraints of SCA rules and customs. The service used at the coronation of King Aethelread II in 978 was followed as closely as possible.

Behind-the-scenes look at the treasures of the Mary Rose

Take in inside look at the artifacts recovered from the Tudor ship the Mary Rose with BBC South Today's Sally Taylor and historic weapon expert and actor Robert Hardy in a BBC video clip.

British universities come together to study Vikings

"Experts coming together to pass on their knowledge to students in the beautiful environments of Oxford and Kirkwall - what could be better?" said Dr Donna Heddle, director of the Orkney-based Centre for Nordic Studies about the collaboration of scottish and English universities on Viking studies.

Summer Was Deadly for Tudors

Recent research indicates that summertime produced the most fatal accidents during the 16th century.