English

Medieval well found under living room floor

Mrs. Colin Steer is not enthused about her husband's discovery of a medieval well under their living room floor. Curiosity about an indentation in the floor led to the discovery that has now sparked tension in the family. David Greene of NPR has the brief story.

Anglo-Saxon artifacts found at Polesworth Abbey

Excavations at Polesworth Abbey near Tamwoth, England, have yielded a variety of exciting artifacts including a brooch and decorates ceramic tiles. The site was originally a Benedictine nunnery founded in the 9th century.

Grave of Richard III found

Archaeologists working on a dig beneath a parking lot in Leicester, England believe they have discovered a grave containing the remains of King Richard III who was killed in battle in 1485.

Banking records found under 15th century heraldry

Economic historians at Queen Mary, University of London have discovered Italian banking records dating to the early 15th century half covered by English coats of arms in a book of British heraldry.

Channel Islands' Roman fort "probably the best in Britain"

Archaeologists working on the oldest standing building in the Channel Islands, a small Roman fort, are pondering the possible decision to turn the building into a visitor center.

Unearthed Roman road changes historians' maps

The patrons of the Stockwell Arms, in Colchester, England, probably never dreamed that they were having a pint atop the remains of a 1st century Roman road. The road was revealed recently after reconstruction of the pub.

Marketing Robin Hood

"In the past, attempts to promote Robin Hood have been regarded as flimsy and lightweight and it needs something to really hold the public's imagination," said Ted Cantle who would like to see his home town of Nottingham, England do more to promote the famous outlaw.

"Immense volcanic eruption" may have led to death of thousands in medieval England

Archaeologists for the Museum of London recently discovered 175 mass graves dating to around 1250, 100 years before the Black Plague. What killed over 10,000 people in England may have been an immense volcanic eruption.

Robin Hood's grave up for sale

Long to own a real piece of English history? The Kirklees Estate, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, purported burial place of Robin Hood, is for sale for something over UK£7 million. The site includes several farmhouses, 750 acres of farmland and woods, and a medieval Cistercian priory.

Large Roman cemetery found in Norfolk

Excavations for a housing development in Great Ellingham, Norfolk, England have uncovered a large cemetery dating to Roman times. The 85 graves are thought to belong to a rural settlement.

Claimant to British throne dies at 71

If things had gone differently in the 15th century, Michael Abney-Hastings, the 14th Earl of Loudoun, would have been King of England. Instead, he worked as a forklift driver in New South Wales, Australia until his death recently at the age of 71.

Roman Brits enjoyed a "refined diet"

Ongoing excavations at the Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire, England show that Roman citizens in the area seasoned their food with spices imported from the Mediterranean, and enjoyed foods such as olives, celery and dill, native to warmer climes.

The memorable Elizabethans

In a recent review for the New York Times, James Shapiro looks at The Elizabethans by A. N. Wilson, which chronicles the lives of a number of eminent men and women of late Tudor times "who made the age so memorable, including the most remarkable of them all, Queen Elizabeth."

Wolsey's Gate "tagged" with graffiti

Wolsey's Gate, a Tudor tower built by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey in Ipswich, England, was the subject of vandalism recently when the 16th century brickwork was covered by graffiti.

Durham University prepares for arrival of the Lindisfarne Gospels

Officials at Durham Cathedral and University are readying themselves for the arrival of the 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Gospels at the university in 2013, with such activities as a concert by the newly formed Lindisfarne Gospels Community Choir.

Whitehall Roman Villa dig completed

In 1996, archaeologists began the investigation of Whitehall Farm in Northamptonshire, England, and were pleased to find coins and pottery buried beneath the farmland. Now, in 2012, the Whitehall Farm Roman Villa and Landscape Project has been completed. (photo)

Women played vital role in Peasants' Revolt

New research has corrected an historical oversight: women were instrumental in the 1381 Peasant's Revolt which saw burning and plundering of London and the execution of Lord Chancellor Simon of Sudbury over his hated poll tax.

Roman dig to showcase "level of history" in Ewell, England

Archaeologists believe that there had been continuous occupation of the area around Ewell Village in England since the 4th Century. Now a three-week dig hopes to uncover evidence of a Roman settlement along the road which ran from Chichester to London. (video)

England's swan census cancelled

The annual royal English "swan upping" was cancelled this year due to dangerous conditions caused by flooding. The event dates back to the 12th century, when the crown laid claim to all swans on open water. The crown still retains this right.

Website created for medieval English inquisitions post mortem

The website Mapping the Medieval Countryside: Places, People, and Properties in the Inquisitions Post Mortem has been created to provide online access to records of the "recorded lands held at their deaths by tenants of the crown."

German cloister windows grace English church

A feature in Vidimus Magazine, a journal dedicated to medieval stained glass, showcases twelve 16th century demi-figures found in windows at Holy Trinity Church, Hatton, Warwickshire, England. The figures depict Old Testament kings and prophets. (photos)

Yorkshire Museum needs UK£2,000 to buy Richard III badge

In 2010, a metal detecting enthusiast from Stillingfleet, near York, England discovered a real treasure, a rare silver gilt badge in the shape of a boar linked to the supporters of King Richard III. Now the Yorkshire Museum hopes to raise UK£2,000 to buy the badge for its collection. (photo)

Whitechapel Road home of London's first black community

Parish records reveal that black citizens were in residence in Tudor England, especially after the beginning of the reign of Elizabeth I. The free people lived, worked and married in the city, in particular around Whitechapel Road in east London.

Olive pit sheds light on early British imports

The discovery of a 1st century BCE olive pit found at an archaeological site in England gives further evidence to the theory that trade in Mediterranean luxury goods pre-dates the Roman empire.

Royal Collection Art

The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace will exhibit more than 100 works by Northern European artists including Durer, Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger.

Modern warriors help excavate ancient ones

British soldiers taking part in an excavation in Wessex found fellow soldiers buried 1,400 years ago. The modern soldiers were part of a rehabilitation program for those who were wounded in Afghanistan.

New theory of St John's College skeletons: Viking raiders

Once believed to have been victoms of the St Brice's Day Massacre, 37 skeletons found on the grounds of St John's College, Oxford in 2008, are now believed to have been executed Viking raiders.

Anglo-Saxon artifacts win Renaissance Museum Award

A treasure of Anglo-Saxon artifacts, found in Loftus, England between 2005 and 2007, has won the Renaissance Museum Award in Durham. The collection has been on display at the Kirkleatham Museum, Redcar, since May 2011. (photo)

Hurrah for the pirate king!

Diver and shipwreck  hunter Todd Stevens thinks he has found a wreck worthy of Hollywood: The John, the craft of notorious privateer John Mucknell, known as the Pirate King of Scilly.

Did Stonehenge unify Britain?

Experts from the Stonehenge Riverside Project have concluded that "Stonehenge was built as a monument to unify the peoples of Britain, after a long period of conflict and regional difference between eastern and western Britain."