English

In Northumberland, moles assist in archaeology

In Northumberland, England, volunteers are sifting through mole hills looking for artifacts from Epiacum, a Roman fort 12 miles south of Hadrian's wall.

Post-punk band goes medieval in new album

Sumer Is Icumen In is believed to be the oldest known song in the English language. Now the post-punk band, The Futureheads, is giving the song new life when it is included in their a cappella album Rant, to be released in April 2012.

Bouncy Stonehenge is fun for Druids and kids alike

A giant inflatable replica of Stonehenge is making waves in Glasgow, Scotland. The attraction is part of the Glasgow International art festival.

And the horse he rode in on...

Mildenhall Museum in Suffolk, England is expanding to accommodate a new exhibit, the remains of an Anglo-Saxon warrior and the horse he rode in on - or at least with which he was buried - complete with bridle, sword and shield. (photo)

All the Queen's eels

For centuries the people of Gloucester, England, have sent a lamprey pie to the reigning royals in celebrations of important occasions. Due to declining numbers, the pie for the Queen's Diamond jubilee will be made from imported lampreys.

A day in the life of a beefeater

John Keohane recently retired as the Chief Yeoman Warder, or Beefeater, of the Tower of London. In a short clip from the documentary On the Road With The Chief Beefeater, Matthew Stadlen discusses the dress uniform. (video)

Cupid reigns at the Bodleian

The magic of Valentine's Day was felt recently at the Bodleian Library In Oxford, England with an exhibition celebrating "the stories of medieval romance and how they have influenced culture, literature and art over the last thousand years."

Four sisters to break Durham guilds' ban on women

"It is something we value and respect and feel honoured and proud to be among the first women freemen to be sworn in," said Karen Crawford about her acceptance into the City of Durham (England) Freemen's ancient craft guilds, a 700-year-old tradition that up until now banned women.

Anglo-Saxon ironwork reference paper online

In 1995, Patrick Ottaway wrote a paper based on his PhD thesis for York University entitled Anglo Saxon Ironwork. The paper is available in PDF format on the PJO Archaeology website.

Coronation Ordo of Kenric & Avelina, King & Queen of the East

The Coronation of TRM Kenric and Avelina, King and Queen of the East, was held on April 14, AS 46 (2012). The ceremony was an experiment in presenting as authentic a coronation as could be managed within the restraints of SCA rules and customs. The service used at the coronation of King Aethelread II in 978 was followed as closely as possible.

Behind-the-scenes look at the treasures of the Mary Rose

Take in inside look at the artifacts recovered from the Tudor ship the Mary Rose with BBC South Today's Sally Taylor and historic weapon expert and actor Robert Hardy in a BBC video clip.

British universities come together to study Vikings

"Experts coming together to pass on their knowledge to students in the beautiful environments of Oxford and Kirkwall - what could be better?" said Dr Donna Heddle, director of the Orkney-based Centre for Nordic Studies about the collaboration of scottish and English universities on Viking studies.

Summer Was Deadly for Tudors

Recent research indicates that summertime produced the most fatal accidents during the 16th century.

Archaic laws to be swept from UK books

Those hoping to kill a Scotsman in York for carrying a bow and arrow had better act fast. This law, along with many others dating as far back as 1322, will soon be removed from the UK law books.

Customary Law Before the Conquest

How were disputes settled in Anglo-Saxon England? Implications suggest there was a common law, but "...where had it come from and how had it developed?"

Volcanoes key to "Little Ice Age"

A new study, led by Gifford Miller at the University of Colorado at Boulder, US, may show that a series of volcanic eruptions around 1300 may have led to the Little Ice Age, which dropped temperatures in Europe in the 1500s.

Anglo-Saxon tools for the re-enactor

Daegrad Tools in Sheffield, England offers a wide range of Anglo-Saxon tools and equipment, extensively researched, including knives, tools and crafting items such as spindles and looms. The website features close-ups of the tools.

Lincolnshire hobbyist strikes gold with silver seal matrix

Metal detctore hobbyist Devin Warmsley had a great day December 7, 2011 when he discovered a 14th century silver gilt seal-matrix worth between UK£5,000 and UK£20,000, according to the British Museum. (photo).

U.S. Magna Carta to return to display

On February 17, 2012, the only medieval copy of the Magna Carta in the United States will return to display in the National Archives. The copy was purchased by philanthropist David Rubenstein in 2007 and is on long-term loan at the museum.

"Best preserved medieval timber barn in England" bought by English Heritage

English Heritage has purchased Harmondsworth Barn, the "Cathedral of Middlesex," for UK£20,000. The barn, originally used for storing grain, "resembles the nave of a large church." It was built in 1426. (photo)

Roman kiln found in North Yorkshire

Plans for the new kitchen and classrom space are on hold at Norton primary school in North Yorkshire, England due to the discovery of a Roman kiln, complete with pottery fragments.

Sports scientists to look for archers aboard the Mary Rose

Sports physiologists are examining the skeletons found on the Mary Rose, an English ship that sank in 1545. They are looking for stress injuries and other markers that would indicate which skeletons were professional archers.

Re-enactor with spear bashes bad guys

Rochdale, England pub manager and re-enactor Neil Ashton never expected to enlist his medieval skills to defend his home until two robbers climbed in a window, causing Ashton to reach for the nearest weapon, his six-foot spear.

Medieval healing spring to be excavated

St. Ann's Well, a medieval healing spring in Nottingham, England, has been scheduled to be excavated sometime in 2012. The site, under a demolished pub, was once believed to have magical healing powers.

Beheaded skeletons might be victims of royal decree

Dr Britt Baillie, from the University of Cambridge, believes that 54 skeletons discovered in 2009 at Ridgeway Hill in England were Viking mercenaries from the time of Aethelred the Unready. All remains were found beheaded "in an unusual fashion from the front."

Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Bath

Believed to date from 270 CE, more than 30,000 Roman coins were found in 2007 in Bath, England.

Exquisite 17th-Century Farmer's Library

Townend, home to the Brownes from the 1520s until 1943, maintains an exquisite collection of more than 170 books from the 1600s, with a few dating to the mid-1500s. What were those farmers reading?

The sound of Shakespeare's English

A new British Library recording offers scenes from Shakespeare spoken in a reconstruction of the Elizabethan accent. NPR's Weekend Edition interviewed Ben Crystal, who directed and acted in the project.

Rare Panels from Henry VIII's Nonsuch Palace

Two canvas panels, presumably commissioned for Henry VIII's Nonsuch Palace, are displayed in renovated condition.

New Discoveries inside York Minster

Recent excavation for a "lift" inside York Minster has turned up the remains of 50 bodies in a charnel pit that probably dates back to the 12th century.