English

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

New Year magic in the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, the period after Christmas was a time for looking ahead to the new year. Practices included superstitions and methods to predict weather for the coming year. The clergy accepted some of the age-old rituals, but were loathe to allow others. A recent article for Phys.org looks at Christmas Day fortune telling.

Silver hoard linked to Kett's Rebellion

A small hoard of silver found in 2011 by metal detector enthusiasts Steven Clarkson and Mark Turner has been linked to Kett's Rebellion, the 1549 uprising against "rich robber barons who had stolen the common land, leaving the peasants to starve." (photo)

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

The complexity of identifying Richard III

Archaeologists, historians and royalists are waiting with bated breath for the determination of the identity of a skeleton found in Leicester, England. The skeleton is believed to be that of King Richard III, but they may have a long wait for the test results.

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Bayeux Tapestry professionally made, claims expert

New research debunks the theory that the Bayeux Tapestry was woven by nuns across England, and shows that the cherished artifact was not a tapestry at all but an embroidery created by a team of professionals under one manager.

Town and Gown unite for East Oxford Community Project

Oxford University and members of the community have joined forces to excavate and document a medieval nunnery at Minchery Farm Paddock near Oxford. Littlemore Priory, a nunnery established in around 1110 was closed by Cardinal Wolsey in 1525.

Henry VIII's Crown - An Update

A  new 11-minute video from Hampton Court Palaces provides details of the behind-the-scenes construction of the replica crown worn by Henry VIII.

Additional pieces added to the Stafforshire Hoard

Archaeologists have returned to the field where the Staffordshire Hoard was found to look for more pieces. Several gold pieces fit in with items already identified.

St. Ursula pilgrim badge donated to Museum of Lancashire

Metal detector enthusiast Paul King was thrilled while trying out new equipment to discover a silver pilgrim badge depicting one of the companions of St. Ursula. Now he will see his find on display at the Museum of Lancashire in Preston. (photo)

University of Exeter app to bring Anglo-Saxon poetry to smart devices

Like Anglo Saxon poetry? The University of Exeter will soon have an app for that! An article for Phys.org writes, "The University of Exeter's Modern Languages department is working in collaboration with Antenna International to create the App which will reveal the secrets of medieval literature to a new audience."

Manx Museum to display 14th century bishop's seal

In February 2012, metal detectorist Andy Falconer discovered a silver seal on te Isle of Man in England. The seal was identified by the Manx Museum as a 14th-century bishop's seal, and have now placed the important artifact on display. (photo)

Dramatic light fills Norwich Cloister

A UK£200,000 donation has made possible new lighting of the 13th century cloister at Norwich Cathedral. "This is a scheme we've been working on for some years and with the help of a generous personal legacy we've at last been able to achieve it," said the Very Reverend Graham Smith, Dean of Norwich. (photo)

Southwell skeleton identified as "deviant dead"

A 6th-7th century skeleton, discovered in 1959 in the town of Southwell, Notts, England, has been classified as a "deviant burial" by Matthew Beresford, of Southwell Archaeology.

Conservation of a Mary Rose hat

One of the many fascinating items found on the Mary Rose, the sunken fastship of King Henry VIII, is a knit hat. A recent photo from the Mary Rose's Facebook page (public) shows a conservator working on preservation of a hat. (photo)

Lacock Cup to be sacrificed to pay for church roof

Some parishoners of St Cyriac’s Church in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England are upset over the proposed auction of the town's cherished medieval chalice, the Lacock Cup, in order to finance repairs to the building's roof. (photo)

Hadrian's Wall: England's defendable border

Owen Jarus takes a look at Hadrian's Wall in a recent feature story on the Live Science website. The article traces the history of the wall and its importance to the study of Roman life in England.

Remains of Northampton Castle discovered

Three feet (one metre) beneath the surface of the site for the new railway station building in Northampton, England, lay a secret, recently discovered: the remains of the 11th Century, Northampton Castle.

Bye bye, Bythewood

The medieval surnames of England are disappearing. That means no more Bythewoods, Pauncefoots or Foothead, according to Debbie Kennett of the Guild of One-Name Studies, a group dedicated to investigating the origins and heritage of surnames.

Battle of Hastings cancelled due to rain

Sunday October 14, 2012 marked the 346th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings which brought Norman rule to Anglo-Saxon England. Unfortunately, rain and mud put a damper on the celebration, cancelling the battle re-enactment.

Saxon skeleton reburied

In 2009, the Chequers Inn in Bressingham, England caught fire and burned. During the demolition, the remains of a 7th century Saxon man were discovered buried beneath the pub. Now the man has received a burial in the churchyard of St John the Baptist.

Raising of Mary Rose marked

Tudor archers with longbows marked the 30th anniversary of the raising of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, from the floor of the Solent. The BBC celebrated the occasion with a short video.

Archaeologists seek Kingsholm Palace

A BBC video reports that archaeologists believe they have discovered the site of the Anglo-Saxon Kingsholm Palace in Gloucester, England.

The beauty of Devon's bench carvings

Historian Todd Gray believes the English often marvel at the beauty of craftsmanship in other countries without realizing what they have in their own backyards. In a short BBC video, he looks at the church bench carvings of Devon.

"Epic parties" marked spectacular Anglo-Saxon feasting hall

1,300 years ago, a "spectacular Anglo-Saxon feasting hall" was abandoned in Kent, England. Recently a team of archaeologists from the University of Reading marked the end of their excavations of the site with a candlelight ceremony surrounding the building which knew so many "epic parties."

I say, is that a sword you're carrying...

Fans of rapier combat and regency romance will appreciate a short film by Leo Burton. The Duel At Blood Creek is the winner of several short film awards. [OOP and PG13]

Subject of Holbein painting identified

X-rays and infra-red photography used during conservation work on a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger have identified the subject as Hans, a merchant working in London's steelyards, rather than the goldsmith Hans of Antwerp, the identity given to the man for over 400 years.

Robin Hood Land?

The city council of Nottingham, England and a private concern are at odds over plans to construct two major attractions honoring Robin Hood in Nottinghamshire. The city hopes to revamp the Nottingham Castle, while Discovery Attractions wants to build a UK£13m theme park near Edwinstowe. (graphic)

US government determines Drake landed at Point Reyes, California

Apparently fed up with four centuries of sqabbling, US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has designated the Point Reyes Peninsula, north of San Francisco, in Marin County, California, as the site where Sir Francis Drake came ashore and claimed the land for England.