Battle of Hastings cancelled again

Officials from English Heritage have cancelled the 2013 re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings set for the weekend of 12 and 13 October. The reason given was that the weather damage to the field from last year's torrential rains, and continuing bad weather have left the field in need of being re-seeded.

Medieval Murder Scene in Jeopardy

Depicting the murder of Thomas Becket, this medieval wall painting is on the verge of disappearing.

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Lewis Chessmen honored with stamps

In gratitude for the loan of the Lewis Chessmen for the Manx National Heritage's Forgotten Kingdom exhibition, MNH director Edmond Southworth presented the British Museum's Naomi Speakman with a set of stamps featuring the medieval chess set. The stamps were issued to the public on January 11, 2013. (photos)

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

Medieval wall collapse damages car

The owner of an automobile in Ludlow, Shropshire, England has an unusual claim after 33 ft (10m) of the town's medieval wall collapsed, showering the car with debris. "Luckily no-one was injured when the wall collapsed," said Rosanna Taylor-Smith, councillor for Ludlow North.

Hadrian’s Wall trail faces erosion challenge

Hadrian's Wall faces a new challenge: waterlogged trails that are causing grass and soil erosion along the trail. Natural England has awarded the Hadrian’s Wall Trust UK£50,000 for drain repair, but visitors can also help.

A Grave! A Grave! My Kingdom for a Grave!

Divisive arguments, including death threats, mar the decision on where to bury the remains of Richard III.

Macclesfield Alphabet Book showcases 16th century design

The recent discovery of the Macclesfield Alphabet Book brought smiles to the lips of experts at the British Library. The 16th century 'model' or 'pattern' book was designed to display the skills of the illuminator for potential clients. (photos)

London rail excavations unearth plague graves

Digging for a new rail line in london, England has revelaed a mass grave with 13 skeletons in it. Dates based on pottery indicate that the graves date to the mid 1300s.

Cardinal Wolsey next in line for body search?

The body seach continues. This time the target is Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who died in 1530, and was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Wolsey died and was buried at Leicester Abbey. Now city councillor Ross Willmott wants to search for Wolsey's remains.

Finest Roman Cockerel

An enameled bronze Roman cockeral has been restored after being found in a child's grave.

Little Moreton Hall "lifted from a fairy story"

A recent Wikipedia feature showcases Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, England, a 16th century house which is, according to the national Trust,  "lifted straight from a fairy story, a gingerbread house."

Politics of dance paper at Toronto library

A copy of a doctorial dissertation by Canadian scholar Emily Frances Winerock has been placed in the University of Toronto Research Repository. An abstract of the paper, Reformation and Revelry: The Practices and Politics of Dancing in Early Modern England, c.1550-c.1640, is available online.

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

Will ghosts help raise funds to save Wymering Manor?

16th century Wymering Manor, in Portsmouth, England, has had a varied history, from a family home to a residence for a Catholic religious order, but few dispute that it is now home to as many as 20 ghosts. The ghosts, however, may be the saving grace for the battered building which requires nearly UK£2m.

The heart of a king

Forensic analysis of the heart of Richard I of England, the Lionheart, have revelaed traces mint, myrtle, and frankincense, indicating the heart was embalmed. The heart was probably wrapped in linen.

DNA study shows lasting Roman gift to Britain

Early in the 5th century, the Romans departed from Britain, leaving behind roads, artifacts, walls, and something else. A new DNA study shows that up to 4 million British men carry Italian genetics, and of that, one million probably originate with the Romans.

Car crash damages Curson Lodge in Ipswich, England

A minor automobile accident has damaged the entrance and corner post of Curson Lodge, Ipswich's "finest" Tudor house. The building dates to 1480 and was a guesthouse of the Curson House estate owned by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

Hair and headdress English-style

Have questions about how to dress your hair or wear a headdress English-style? Tufts University can help with its website entitled Jewels, Hair and Accessories of the Middle Ages.

Proposed tomb for Richard III

The Richard III Society has submitted a proposed tomb to hold the recently-identified remains of King Richard III. While no site was specified for it, the "limestone monument would blend modern and medieval style decorations to reflect the king's life." (photo)

Hoard of Children's Toys Discovered

A stash of "street toys", dated from 1570-1630, was unearthed in an old stairwell of the Market Harborough parish church, England.

Escrick ring baffles archaeologists

A beautiful sapphire ring discovered in 2009 by a metal detectorist in North York, England, has stumped experts who have been unable to date the ring. (photo)

Stafford Castle to be restored

The Stafford Borough Council reports that over UK£75,000 will be spent to restore Stafford Castle, a late 11th century Norman castle in Stafford, England.

Tolkien's tower bought for UK£1

Decades after J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, one of the "two towers" which may have inspired the writer in the second book, has been purchased with plans for restoration. (video)

Shoes of Roman children correct myth about military life

Professor Elizabeth Greene looks at shoes differently than most people. At the recent 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, she presented research on how Roman children's shoes reflected their family status, especially in military familities.

Bayeux tapestry complete at last

The residents of he Channel Island of Alderney, led by librarian Kate Russell, have recently completed a major project: the final panels of the Bayeux tapestry. (photo)

Tiny coin tells story of post-Roman York

The discovery of a tiny silver coin has had a big impact on archaeologists studying medieval York, England.

Face to face

After centuries - and a world-changing divorce - Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon are back together, at least in London’s National Portrait Gallery. The portrait of a young Henry VIII and a newly-restored portrait of Catherine, both from the 1520s, now hang together in the gallery. (photo)

Beowulf manuscript online

Ever tried to read Beowulf in the original language? Now you can, thanks to the British Library.