English

The Lime and Ice Project seeks answers about 16th century mill

Who built the 16th century water mill recently discovered in North York Moors National Park? Archaeologists are looking for the answer among official documents after unearthing the complex, complete with millstones and the outlines of watercourses.

Which Catherine? Tudor Portrait Re-identified

Wearing the "wrong clothes" helped experts decide that the portrait wasn't of Henry VIII's last wife but was of his first.

Retire in beautiful Lincoln!

The city of Lincoln, England has been a Roman outpost since the first century. Situated on the trade route between London and York, the area was first a fortress town and later a colonia, a retirement settlement for soldiers who wished to stay in Britain.

Medieval graffiti in Norfolk churches

In the Middle Ages, some church members had what, in modern life, would be considered an odd way to express an idea or offer a prayer: they wrote on the church wall. Now the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey hopes to record pre-Reformation graffiti in area churches.

Hereford Mappa Mundi removed for conservation evaluation

A 700-year-old map of the world, the Hereford Mappa Mundi, has been removed from display in Hereford Cathedral for evaluation of its condition. The 52 in. (132cm) circular map shows a medieval view of the world with Jerusalem at the center and Paradise "surrounded by a wall and a ring of fire, roughly where Japan would be." (photos)

PBS offers new series on Shakespeare

On January 25, 2013, PBS stations will premiere Shakespeare Uncovered, a six-part series to be shown on three consecutive Friday evenings. The series will take a multi-faceted look at several plays, and it will include live performance segments.

Winchester Round Table re-created as watch

For the SCAdian who has everything: 18 K rose gold watch depicting the Round Table of King Arthur and his knights, in a limited saeries of 88. The watch, by Roger Dubuis, will be showcased at the 2013 Salon of Haute Horlogerie. (photos)

"Unexpected" Roman theatre found in Kent

Dr Paul Wilkinson, founder of the Kent Archaeological Field School, believes that he and his team have discovered the remains of a Roman theatre - the first in Britain - right in his backyard.

Elizabethan Embezzler and Shakespeare?

The autograph of Richard Stonley, an important figure in Elizabeth I's Treasury, appears in a newly-printed copy of one of Shakespeare's works in 1593.

Tolkien-inspired "Hobbit House" graces Chester County, Pennsylvania

A devoted collector of J.R.R. Tolkien memorabilia, having spent thirty years accumulating a private collection, wanted an appropriate house to showcase the collection. Architect Peter Archer overcame surprising engineering challenges to bring the house to reality.

St Chad and Gospels and Wycliffe New Testament now available online

The Lichfield Cathedral and the University of Kentucky have joined forces to create a website presenting online versions of the St Chad Gospels (also known as the Llandeilo Fawr Gospels) and the Wycliffe New Testament, both in scanned images and searchable transciptions.

Eastgate House to become museum

Admirers of Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers (Westgate) and The Mystery of Edwin Drood (The Nun's House) will be gratified to know that Eastgate House in High Street in Rochester, Kent, England, is scheduled to be restored. (photo)

History Today offers best of 2012 free

In an attempt to lure in potential subscribers, History Today magazine has released a selection of its most popular stories from 2012 on its blog.

Recreating the Blue Boar Inn

A team of archaeologists and academics in Leicester, England have digitally recreated the Blue Boar Inn where Richard III spent the night before the battle of Bosworth, where he met his fate. The inn was demolished in the 19th century and is currently the site of a Travelodge. (video)

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Hidden Secrets of Tudor Portraits

Portraits of two Elizabethan courtiers, it seems, were painted over Catholic religious paintings.

Experts stumped by Roman earring

The design on a gold earring disc, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Keswick, England, has experts stumped. The disc dates to the Roman era and "features a scorpion, phallus, snake and crab." (photo)

Boar mount possibly linked to Richard III

Experts are investigating the possibility that a copper-alloy boar mount, discovered near the Thames River in London, might have belonged to King Richard III. (photo)

Public Catalogue Foundation publishes all publicly-owned British paintings

The Public Catalogue Foundation (PCF), together with the BBC, has created a web database of the United Kingdom’s entire collection of oil paintings in public ownership - all 211,861 of them! The works are available on the Your Paintings website.

The souvenirs of Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall in northern England has long been a tourist attraction, but souvenirs, highlighted in a new book by Roman expert David Breeze, shows that the wall attracted tourists soon after it was built. (photo)

Norfolk metal detectorist finds declared treasure

Several objects dating to the Middle Ages have been declared treasure by the Norfolk Historic Environment Services, including a 6th century brooch, an Anglo-Saxon sword belt mount, and a copper alloy jetton converted to a brooch. (photos)

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

New Year magic in the Middle Ages

In the Middle Ages, the period after Christmas was a time for looking ahead to the new year. Practices included superstitions and methods to predict weather for the coming year. The clergy accepted some of the age-old rituals, but were loathe to allow others. A recent article for Phys.org looks at Christmas Day fortune telling.

Silver hoard linked to Kett's Rebellion

A small hoard of silver found in 2011 by metal detector enthusiasts Steven Clarkson and Mark Turner has been linked to Kett's Rebellion, the 1549 uprising against "rich robber barons who had stolen the common land, leaving the peasants to starve." (photo)

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

The complexity of identifying Richard III

Archaeologists, historians and royalists are waiting with bated breath for the determination of the identity of a skeleton found in Leicester, England. The skeleton is believed to be that of King Richard III, but they may have a long wait for the test results.

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Bayeux Tapestry professionally made, claims expert

New research debunks the theory that the Bayeux Tapestry was woven by nuns across England, and shows that the cherished artifact was not a tapestry at all but an embroidery created by a team of professionals under one manager.

Town and Gown unite for East Oxford Community Project

Oxford University and members of the community have joined forces to excavate and document a medieval nunnery at Minchery Farm Paddock near Oxford. Littlemore Priory, a nunnery established in around 1110 was closed by Cardinal Wolsey in 1525.

Henry VIII's Crown - An Update

A  new 11-minute video from Hampton Court Palaces provides details of the behind-the-scenes construction of the replica crown worn by Henry VIII.