English

Richard on the couch

Now that Richard III's body has been identified, experts are probing his mind. In a paper presented March 2, 2013 at the University of Leicester, Professor Mark Lansdale and forensic psychologist Dr Julian Boon offered an analysis of Richard III's character.

Generous donors complete funding for the Mary Rose Museum

The final UK£35,000 needed to complete the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, England's Historic Dockyard has been raised thanks to a plea by the Mary Rose Trust. Museum officials are "putting the finishing touches" on the museum's interior, including filling cases with artifacts receoved from Henry VIII's flagship. (photo)

Kent church: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet"

A derelict church in Eastwell, Kent, England, may hold the final resting place of Richard Plantagenet, illegitimate son of King Richard III. A grave in St Mary's churchyard is marked with the inscription: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet". Now scientists want to know the truth.

Shakespeare as educator

The works of Shakespeare have often been used to educate scholars throughout the world, but to historians in Titchfield near Southampton, England, the education may have taken place closer to home. Scholars there believes that William Shakespeare may have spent the years 1589-1592 working as a schoolmaster in the town.

Unidentified Winchester bones could be exhumed for testing

The recent discovery of the remains of Richard III have led experts to wonder if an unmarked grave in Winchester, England might hold the bones of King Alfred the Great.

Who's the rightful British monarch?

Is Queen Elizabeth II the rightful ruler of Great Britain? Tony Robinsons doesn't think so. He explains in a 48-min. documentary produced for Channel 4.

Ransom profitable for medieval rank-and-file

History has recorded that the ransom of kings and nobles was a popular way for armies to raise money during the Middle Ages, but new research shows that the practice may have also been popular among common soldiers.

Hadrian's Wall: Exciting New Aerial Photographs

Aerial photographs are rewriting the history of Hadrian's Wall. Images indicate there were hundreds - even thousands - of Iron Age settlements there long before the Romans. (photos, video)

Remnants of Iron Age Feast Found

Cattle skulls and thirteen cauldrons which showed residue of animal fats were unearthed in England.

London excavation yields wealth of Roman artifacts

Excavations at the former site of the Temple of Mithras in London, England have yielded over 10,000 artifacts, many in a remarkable state of preservation. The finds include a shoe, jewelery, documents, and table wares.

Medieval road found under Lincoln

Six feet below street level in the center of Lincoln, England lies a medieval road, complete with wheel ruts, and bounded by a large building, such as a warehouse. Now archaeologists are faced with the task of discovering all they can about the site in six weeks before construction begins on a new store.

Videos from Hampton Court Kitchens

Five short videos produced by Historic Royal Palaces explain some of the cookery aspects that are demonstrated each month at Hampton Court.

Portrait of a wealthy Roman

After nearly 2000 years, a wealthy Roman citizen whose remains were discovered 18 years ago in Caerleon, near Newport, Wales, has a face. (portrait)

Tudor Armor-Piercing Cannonballs?

Cannonballs recovered from the Mary Rose wreck in England have been shown to contain iron cores, allowing the cannons to punch the shot through enemy vessels.

Adrian IV last English Pope

The Conclave is over and a new Pope chosen, but the English never stood a chance. There has not, in fact, been an English Pope since Adrian IV in 1155.

"Manuscripts Online" brings medieval Britain to life

The University of Sheffield’s Humanities Research Institute has created Manuscripts Online which "brings to life early printed primary sources of medieval Britain, giving online access to written materials from the year 1000 to 1500 and allowing users to contribute to the collective body of knowledge on the subject for the first time."

Did "Solarsteinn" lead Vikings west?

Experts have long speculated that a Norse Solarsteinn, or sunstone, was used to help Viking mariners find their way west through cloudy weather, and the discovery of such an artifact on a sunken, 16th century English warship may prove it.

“It went beep, beep, beep. Then we dug into the mud"

Finding treasure with a metal detector is a hobby for all ages. Just ask three-year-old James Hyatt who, along with Dad and Grandpa, discovered an engraved gold reliquary locket from the early 16th century 8 inches beneath the Essex soil. (photo)

Avebury ranks second in world heritage sites

The "quiet, bucolic setting, the lack of crowds and the ability to wander freely" has won Avebury's stone circle in Wiltshire, England a second place among best world heritage sites by Which? travel magazine.

"Princes in the Tower" to remain unidentified - for now

Shakespeare wrote that Richard III plotted the deaths of his young nephews in the Tower of London, a theory touted by the Tudors but never confirmed. In the 17th century, the bones of two young children were found in the Tower and were reburied in Westminster Abbey as the princes, Edward V and Richard Duke of York.

"Whispers in stone" on Norwich Cathedral walls

"Just about everything that would have been important to the citizens of Norwich during the Middle Ages" has been found scrawled on the walls of Norwich Cathedral report volunteers from the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey, who are cataloging the grafitti. (photos)

Robin Hood really William of Kensham?

William of Kensham was a resistance fighter in Kent, England who fought the French forces of Prince Louis in 1216, and he might, according to historian Sean McGlynn, be the basis for the Robin Hood myth.

Battle of Hastings cancelled again

Officials from English Heritage have cancelled the 2013 re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings set for the weekend of 12 and 13 October. The reason given was that the weather damage to the field from last year's torrential rains, and continuing bad weather have left the field in need of being re-seeded.

Medieval Murder Scene in Jeopardy

Depicting the murder of Thomas Becket, this medieval wall painting is on the verge of disappearing.

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Lewis Chessmen honored with stamps

In gratitude for the loan of the Lewis Chessmen for the Manx National Heritage's Forgotten Kingdom exhibition, MNH director Edmond Southworth presented the British Museum's Naomi Speakman with a set of stamps featuring the medieval chess set. The stamps were issued to the public on January 11, 2013. (photos)

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

Medieval wall collapse damages car

The owner of an automobile in Ludlow, Shropshire, England has an unusual claim after 33 ft (10m) of the town's medieval wall collapsed, showering the car with debris. "Luckily no-one was injured when the wall collapsed," said Rosanna Taylor-Smith, councillor for Ludlow North.

Hadrian’s Wall trail faces erosion challenge

Hadrian's Wall faces a new challenge: waterlogged trails that are causing grass and soil erosion along the trail. Natural England has awarded the Hadrian’s Wall Trust UK£50,000 for drain repair, but visitors can also help.

A Grave! A Grave! My Kingdom for a Grave!

Divisive arguments, including death threats, mar the decision on where to bury the remains of Richard III.