English

Honoring the "standing cup"

Like their modern counterparts, medieval people enjoyed entertaining guests, often with their best utensils. Naomi Speakman, curator for the British Museum's Late Medieval Collection, salutes the museum's newest acquisition, the Lacock Cup, in a feature article on the museum blog. (photos)

Chivalry died at Agincourt

In an excerpt from his book Agincourt: My Family, The Battle And The Fight For France, in the Mail Online, English writer and adventurer Sir Ranolph Fiennes discusses his ancestors' parts in the 1415 Battle of Agincourt, the day, he writes, chivalry died.

New secrets of Stonehenge revealed

Just when scientists think they have learned everything there is to know about Stonehenge, new technologies reveal tantalizing secrets. Laser scanning of the area around the monument showed at least 17 circular shrines as well as other neolithic structures. (photo and map)

UK£3,000 needed to secure Lindisfarne Hoard

In 2003, builder Richard Mason found an old, pottery jug on the island of Lindisfarne, in northern England. Later, he noticed that the jug contained 17 coins, dating from the reigns of Henry VI - Elizabeth I. The silver and gold hoard has been valued at UK£30,900, but the Great North Museum in Newcastle needs an additional UK£3,000 to purchase the coins for its collection. (photo)

Roman finery found under Colchester department store

Construction work at Williams & Griffin department store in Colchester, England has led to the remarkable discovery of a wealthy Roman woman's jewelry collection, considered to be "one of the finest of its kind ever discovered in Britain." (photos)

No sale for Hastings sword

A recent Christies auction failed to sell a medieval sword, purported to have been a trophey taken by Humphrey De Bohun, a kinsman of William the Conqueror, from the Battle of Hastings. The owner had hoped the sword would bring up to £120,000. (photo)

West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village to get new house

The West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village in Suffolk, England, with its sunken-featured buildings, has been an important archaeological site since 1965 and a tourist attraction with reconstructed buildings since 1999. Now a new house will be built to replace one that is "beyond repair." (photos)

Mary, Queen of Scots letter sells for US$28,000

On September 18, 2014, RR Auction, in Boston, Massachusetts, auctioned a private letter from Mary Queen of Scots transferring control of her property, Wassy Castle, located in eastern Champagne, France, to her maitre d'hotel, Jacques de la Montaigne. The letter was sold to a private bidder for US$28,750 (UK£17,472). (photo)

Soldiers' kits through the centuries

The British newspaper The Telegraph recetly published a history feature showcasing British soldiers' kits through the centuries. The feature consists of a slideshow of the complete set and an annotated list of each item.

Dorchester garden produces wealth of medieval pottery

Rosemary Maw's gardening has produced more than just beautiful flowers. Her home, The Old Manor in Stratton, three miles from Dorchester, England, has produced over 100 historical artifacts including "over 150 bottle fragments, almost 20 pieces of medieval jugs, and extensive cobble and flint foundations" from its back garden.

Medieval site with a royal connection

Archaeologists in York, England will have the rare opportunity to investigate a site which has lain undisturbed for nearly 500 years. The Hidden Guildhall investigation will focus on riverside property once the site of the medieval friary visited by the Duke of Gloucester, later Richard III.

Medieval cloister walls found at Merton Priory dig

Merton Priory, in Surrey, England, was founded in 1117 and dissolved by Henry VIII in 1538. In recent years, archaeologists have been excavating the foundations of the Merton Priory Chapter House and have uncovered the priory's medieval cloister walls. (photos)

Barley malting oven found in Northampton, England

A nearly perfectly-preserved barley malting oven from the 13th century has been discovered by archaeologists working on an excavation in Bridge Street, Northampton, England. The construction was found complete with char marks on the hearth. (photo)

Trust bids to buy Roman fort from the Church

A Roman dig considered "the Pompeii of the North" is being sold in order to keep the site out of the hands of developers. Binchester Roman Town, in Bishop Auckland, England, owned by the Church of England, has drawn a UK£2m bid from the Auckland Castle Trust.

Roman soldiers "meditated" in comfort

Finding objects relating to everyday life is common for archaeologists at Vindolanda, the Roman fort near Hadrian's Wall, but the recent discovery of a wooden toilet seat - the oldest known - was special moment.

Anglo Saxon buckle declared rare find

Archaeologists in Suffolk, England are pondering the discovery of a silver buckle, dating to the 9th century, by a metal detectorist on a Suffolk farm. "The costumes worn at this time don't appear to need buckles and so they are rarely found," said Dr Helen Geake, from the Portable Antiquities Scheme. (photo)

The lifestyle changes of Richard III

Everyone knows Richard III was king of England, however briefly, but did he live a royal lifestyle? Researchers say yes. A new study shows that the king's location and diet changed after his ascendance to the throne.

Medieval shipwreck found off Cornish coast

The remains of a ship, dating to 1305, have been found near the Isles of Scilly, along the coast of Cornwall. The shipwreck is believed to be the oldest documented ship lost in the area's dangerous, rocky coast.

Northampton's oldest brewery found during construction work

Archaeologists working at the site of the new Northamptonshire County Council headquarters have uncovered what is believed to be the town of Northampton's first brewery. Dating to the 13th century, the large stone pit shows scorch marks where barley had been roasted. (video)

Leiston Abbey dig reveals gaming piece and curse tablet

Leiston Abbey in the 14th century must have been an interesting place, considering some artifacts found by volunteers during a two-week archaeological excavation in the summer of 2014, including a Nuremburg jetton "poker chip" and a metal tablet expected to contain a curse. (photos)

Stonehenge's "perfect circle" revealed

Archaeologists have long debated over the original shape of Stonehenge, but recent dry weather in England has solved the mystery: the stone circle was actually...a circle. (photo)

Own a piece of Magna Carta history

For a mere UK£4 million, buyers can own a piece of English history in the form of a small island in the Thames River where, it is believed, the rebellious barons who created the Magna Carta camped before the signing. (photos)

Extraordinary finds at "Pompeii of the north"

Archaeologists marvel at discoveries from the Binchester Roman Fort near Bishop Auckland in northern England, a 2nd century site which has been dubbed the "Pompei of the north." (photos)

Long lost Salisbury Hall discovered beneath former stadium car park

In 1322, the Salisbury Manor was built in Walthamstow, a suburb of London. The manor burned in the 16th century and was replaced by a Tudor structure, but was also lost. Now a team of archaeologists from Archaeology South East have found Salisbury Manor  beneath a former car park for Walthamstow Stadium.

Abandoned school becomes Richard III grave visitor center

Leicester, England mayor Peter Soulsby was on hand recently to celebrate the opening of a UK£4 million visitor center near the site of the grave of Richard III, discovered in 2012 in a city car park. The center is housed in an abandoned school building.

Archaeologists fail to solve mystery of Silchester

Archaeologists have packed their tools and left the site of the Silchester Roman town in Hampshire, England, still without an answer as to why the major town was abandoned in the sixth century.

First English book brings more than £1m

The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye is considered to be the first book ever to be printed in English. A translation of a French book by William Caxton, the 1474 English edition sold recently at auction for more than £1m. (photo)

Viking longboat to draw visitors to the public library

In 1838, the remains of a Viking longboat were discovered at Stanley Ferry, near Wakefield, England, at a natural crossing point for the River Calder. Now the 1,000-year-old vessel will be on display at the Wakefield Library. (video, photos)

Medieval tagging: what it means

"We want to record it before it's lost," said Brian Porter of Lincolnshire's medieval graffiti project about thousands of medieval doodles found on the walls of English churches. Porter is co-chair of the volunteer project to record the graffiti and learn more about the thoughts of the people of the time. (photos)

Sutton Hoo brooch replica added to exhibit

In the 1840s, a ploughman in Suffolk, England discovered what remained of an Anglo-Saxon gold brooch, and traded it for a set of teaspoons. Recently, as part of the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial, a replica of the brooch, complete with gold, silver, bone and garnet stones, has been included in the exhibit. (photo)