Spanish

Remains of Pere el Gran found in Tarragona, Spain

A team of archaeologists at the Santa Maria de Santes Creus monastery in Tarragona, Spain have used non-intrusive methods to investigate the tomb of Pere el Gran (1240-1285), one of the country's most important rulers. (video)

"Ship of stone" draws visitors to Segovia

"In the centre of Segovia, between the old town and the new town, there is a Roman relic that makes Hadrian's Wall look like a heap of rubble. Segovia's famous aqueduct is nearly 30 metres high and more than 800 metres long, and although I'd seen countless photos of it, that's still no substitute for the real thing. Standing before it for the first time takes your breath away," writes Guardian travel writer William Cook about Segovia, Spain.

Reporter searches for allure of archaeology in Clunia, Spain

According to Mark Piesing of The Guardian, volunteering on the late Roman archaeological site in Clunia, Spain leaves one feeling more like Gil Grissom than Indiana Jones, yet volunteering for digs is more popular than ever. Piesing set off to find out why.

[CAL] A Day at the Faire

The weekend of September 25-27, the shire of Gryphon's Mark will be hosting A Day at the Faire. Merchants will be an integral part of this event. Because of this, they will be placed in the center of activities. Just like a real fair! We need merchants of any size - blanket merchants as - well as larger ones!

[LOC] Alhambra Nights

Once again, Stowe-on-the-Wowld is running this event inspired by Moorish Spain. Heathens and Infidels will clash in the afternoon tourney after which there will be a lavish feast in sumptuous surroundings.

13th century Jewish remains returned to earth in Spain

Negotiations between the Spanish government and Jewish leaders concluded recently with the reburial of more than 100 medieval Jews whose final resting places were disturbed during construction of a school in Toledo, Spain.

Spanish ceremonial armor exhibit in Washington D.C.

Pennsic attendees may want to take a side trip to Washington D.C. to view an exhibit of Spanish art and ceremonial armor. The Art of Power: Royal Armor and Portraits From Imperial Spain will be on display at the National Gallery of Art through November 1, 2009. (photos)

Ageless Artifice

This company sells body care products (salves, powders, etc.) made from original historical recipes and packaged in reproduction containers. Each item comes with the original recipe.

400-year restoration of walls of Cadiz continues

For 400 years, city officials in Cadiz, Spain have been charged with the task of repairing and restoring the city's massive walls. The masonry walls, damaged in 1596 by the English, serve to keep out the ocean.

Murder of Thomas a Becket subject of medieval Spanish paintings

An important link between the joined histories of England and Spain remains covered by wooden panels in a ruined church in Soria, Spain. The panels depict the murder of St. Thomas a Becket, an act that sat heavily on the shoulders of king Henry II of England. (photo)

Inbreeding may have led to the demise of the Hapsburgs

A new study by geneticists from the University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain shows that inbreeding may have weakened the male line and brought about the end of the Hapsburg dynasty. The last king, Charles II of Spain, died in 1700 without male heirs.

Tulips brought to Europe by the Turks

New research by experts at the University of Cordoba and the School of Arabic Studies seems to indicate that the first tulips in Europe were brought to Islamic Spain by way of Byzantium. The bulbs could then have been brought to Holland, where they became the country's symbol.

Mysterious message of the Alhambra decoded

Researchers and lovers of the Alhambra, the 14th century palace in Castile, Spain, have long puzzled and marveled at the Arabic inscriptions which cover the walls and arches of the building, wondering "What are these walls telling me?" Now Juan Castilla, from the School of Arabic Studies at Spain's Higher Scientific Research Council, has produced a video which claims to translate 3,116 of more than 10,000 inscriptions carved around the building.

SCA members make ready for Santiago Pilgrimage

Medieval re-enactment is afoot in Drachenwald in the form of a plan to take part in the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela "using as medieval gear as possible," an endeavor in the footsteps of thousands of medieval pilgrims.

[AET] Melee Madness

Madness in the form of battle fever has once again descended upon the Barony of Endless Hills! The Spanish Inquisition is upon us!

[DRA] Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela

The idea is to make a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela using as medieval gear as possible. In short, our " frame of reference" is romantic history as seen by the SCA. The trip will take a minumum of seven days, we will walk approximately 150 kilometers and this will cost (approximately) from 200€ to 500€ (depending how much you have to fly).

California monks reconstruct 800 year old building

Monks at the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, California are rebuilding an 800 year old chapter house transported from Ovila, Spain to California in 1931 by William Randoph Hearst.

Animal bones used in construction of Spanish walls

Archaeologists studying the chemistry of 14th century Moorish architecture have found that burnt animal bones were mixed with other materials to create a protective covering for walls. Analysis of the walls, coupled with the discovery of a 14th century brick oven, have led to the conclusion.

Researchers use church records to reconstruct weather patterns

A team of Spanish researchers are using records of agricultural rites kept by the Cathedral of Toledo to reconstruct a pattern of droughts that plagued the country between 1506 and 1900.

16th century Spanish military tent

Rhys Terafan Greydragon has posted photos of an elaborate military pavilion, once owned by Carlos V of Spain, on his greydragon.org website. The photos were taken at the Museo del Ejercito in Madrid, Spain.

Rare straw helmet on display at the Met

Warning: This helmet will not pass SCA inspection! Lady Maggie has discovered an online catalog entry from the Metropolitan Museum of Art showing a 16th century plaited straw helmet decorated with cut velvet and embroidery. (photo)

Divers seek treasure-laden Armada ship

Marine archaeologists, led by a Scottish royal, are searching the silt of Tobermory Bay near Scotland's Isle of Mull for the wreck of a Spanish Armada ship reputed to have carried a hoard of treasure.

DNA proves morisco mark on Spain

500 years after the Inquisition expelled many Moors from Spain, DNA proves that their "genetic legacy" is still strong, according to Professor Mark Jobling, of the University of Leicester.

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

[OUT] 12th Night: The Reconquista

description:
Leave behind the cold winter of the Outlands and for one evening come to the sunny climate of Spain to celebrate with the Barony of Caerthe the Twelfth Night tradition.

At the end of the 15th century, Spain sat on the brink of her most wondrous chapter in history, the Siglo de Oro, or Golden Age. The year 1492 was perhaps the most decisive in the history of Spain. King Ferdinand of Aragon and Queen Isabella of Castile had realized their goal of reuniting Spain with their triumphant entry into Granada. Of course, this was also the year that Christopher Columbus, sailing under a Spanish flag, left for the Americas. Location:
Barony of Caerthe (Brighton, Colorado)

Sacred sounds in New York City

The Church of St. Mary the Virgin recently rang with the sounds of choral polyphony when the Tallis Scholars, led by Peter Phillips presented a program of Spanish Renaissance music as part of Columbia University's early music series. Allan Kozinn of the New York Times has a review.

Was the telescope invented in Spain?

An article for the magazine History Today claims that the telescope may have been invented in Spain by a Burgundian spectacle maker named Juan Roget, rather than in the Netherlands or Italy, as previously believed.

Textile resource from Burgos Cathedral available online

Bridgette reports that The Report on the Textiles from Burgos Cathedral, Madrid, Spain is now available online in PDF format.

Life lessons learned on El Camino de Santiago

Modern spiritual seekers are finding value in a medieval pilgrimage. Spain's 500-mile-long El Camino de Santiago gives participants plenty of time to meditate. Jillian Mueller of the Christian Science Monitor chronicles her journey.

Celts may trace roots to Spain and Portugal

Professor John Koch believes the Celtic homeland is more likely Spain or Portugal than northern Europe. Koch, who is a professor at the Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies Centre at the University of Wales, has found evidence of Celtic texts in Spain and Portugal that are 500 years earlier than those from northern Europe.