Spanish

16th century Spanish pattern book available online

The World Digital Library has posted a digital version of the Book on Geometry, Practice, and Patterns by Juan de Alcega. Published in 1580, the book offers techniques for ordering lengths of fabric based on the measurement of the "ell."

Brazilian shipwreck may be Spanish colonial supply ship

In 2005, a team of divers with the Barra Sul Project discovered the remains of a ship off the coast of Santa Catarina in Brazil. Now they believe that vessel may have been a lost supply ship sent by Spain to build two forts on the Strait of Magellan.

Isabel López before the inquisition

In September 1516, Judeo-conversa Isabel López, along with her mother María, was arrested by the Inquisition  in Cogolludo, Spain, observing the Sabbath by dressing in holiday garb and joining others to celebrate. Her trial is the subject of an article by Renée Levine Melammed for the Jerusalem Post Magazine.

[CAL] Layli al-Waqud

Welcome to Layli al-Waqud! Night of the Bonfires and Bardic Bedlam! Join the Shire of Crystal Mynes and the Shire March of the Grimfells for Layli al-Waqud, the Night of the Bonfires!  Featuring Bardic Bedlam!

“Ornament of the World” depicted in video on Moorish Spain

A medieval German traveler once described Granada, in Moorish Spain, as the “Ornament of the World.” A video posted on the Moroccan Design website showcases the beauty and enlightment of the region.

British crusaders conquered, then settled in Tortosa

In the mid12th century, English and Welsh crusaders took part in the siege and capture of the Spanish city of Tortosa. Some apparently liked the climate and decided to stay. In an article for the Journal of Medieval History, Antoni Virgili tells their story.

13th century Spanish document surfaces at University of Virginia

15 years ago, George Greenia discovered a 13th century medieval Spanish document, missing for centuries, in the archives at the University of Virginia’s Alderman Library. Now the contents and story of discovery of the document have been disclosed.

First church in Peru found

Peruvian and Spanish archaeologists recently used historical documents from an archive in Spain to help locate the site of Peru's oldest Roman Catholic church near Piura on the country's northern coast. The church was built in 1534.

Bodleian Library digitizes Mishneh Torah

One of the most important manuscripts in the Bodleian Library's Hebrew collection is the 12th century Mishneh Torah, a guide to Jewish law handwritten and signed by Hebrew scholar Maimonides. The manuscript has now been digitized and is available online.

Norman involvement in 11th century Spain

In his 2007 dissertation for the University of Nottingham, Norman and Anglo-Norman Participation in the Iberian Reconquista c.1018 – c.1248, Lucas Villegas-Aristizabal considers the contribution of the Normans, especially Crusaders, in the Christianizing of the Iberian Peninsula.

Isabella Breviary facsimile offered in Spain

M. Moleiro in Barcelona, Spain is offering a facsimile edition of the Isabella Breviary, a 15th century illuminated manuscript given to Isabella the Catholic to commemorate the double marriage of her children, Infante John of Asturias and Infanta Joanna. (photos, video)

Tale of a 15th century Spanish "conversa"

In an article for the Jerusalem Post, professor of Jewish history and dean at the Schechter Institute, Renee Levine Melamme tells the story of a family of 15th century "crypto-Jews" tried by the Spanish Inquisition in Ciudad Real.

Pilgrimage for the modern penitent

Walking to Compostella is so 1482! Today, pilgrims reach Santiago de Compostela by bicycle, bus, and even airplane. This is one of many ways that the famed Pilgrim route has adapted to the modern world.

Madrid researchers search for bones of Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote

Researchers are about to undertake a Quixotic quest - to find the lost bones of Miguel de Cervantes. They are believed to be somewhere in a convent in Madrid.

12th century manuscript missing from Spanish cathedral

Pilgrims to the cathedral Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain might have been guided there by the Codex Calixtinus, a 12th century guidebook which has mysteriously disappeared from the church.

16th century automaton replicates "prayer and trance"

Tradition says that a 16th century mechanical monk, now owned by the Smithsonian Institution, was created by Juanelo Turriano for Spanish Emperor Charles V. The monk walks, prays, and kisses a wooden cross. (photo and video)

Painted pottery at West Kingdom A&S

Tangwystyl reports that she has posted an album showcasing Spanish pottery painted at her class at A&S and June Crown in the Kingdom of the West.

16th century Chinese bronze found in shipwreck off Mexico

A 16th century Chinese bronze in the form of a Foo Dog has been found off the Pacific coast of Baja, Mexico. The artifact is believed to come from the cargo of the galleon San Felipe which disappeared in 1576.

Spanish fencing article published

On the A Midsummer Night's Blog, Puck has published an article on the Spanish defensive technique called the Atajo.

Columbus' ships to visit U.S. shores summer 2011

The Columbus Foundation will sponsor a tour of two of its historical replicas, the Niña and the Pinta, to locations in the northeast and Great Lakes of the United States in 2011.

Coin composition tells story of Europe's Price Revolution

Anne-Marie Desaulty believes coins can tell a story. She and colleagues from the University of Lyon are using mass spectrometry to study isotopes of lead and copper found in coins of the 16th and 17th centuries in hopes of discovering the cause of the great Price Revolution.

11th century "church musical manuscript" features Mozarabic plainchant

A recent blog entry for the BibliOdyssey website offers a close-up look at the amazing Visigothic Antiphonal, an 11th century church document packed with hymns, illuminations and circular calendars.

Tallis Scholars bring medieval Spain to New York

The vocal music of medieval Spain was showcased recently when the Tallis Scholars performed Tomás Luis de Victoria's works at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin. Karsten Moran of The New York Times has a review.

[OUT] Something Yummy 3

Come and join us for a day in Spain.  Food, clothing, heraldy, the Templars, plants, armor, the list will continue. See Windkeep.net for the latest class schedule.

The Berry site: A Spanish "lost colony"

Did Spanish conquistadors first settle North Carolina? After discoveries in the 1980's along the Catawba River, where archaeologists found a Spanish fort, they just may have. The Berry Site is located near Morganton, North Carolina.

Atlantis found at last?

For the first time in several years, archaeologists believe they have located the lost continent of Atlantis. The latest theory is the subject of a new television film on the National Geographic Channel entitled Finding Atlantis.

[ATL] Feast of the Saints: St. Anthony of Padua

St. Anthony of Padua (1195-1231) is most popularly known as the patron saint of lost items. He is also the patron saint of barren women, amputees,  travelers, and many more found here. His passion for charity has inspired the charity activities at our event: Project Linus.

[CAL] Chieftains

Join us in a celebration of the Court of Alfonso el Sabio of Castile: 13th Century Spain

El Cid: epitome of the medieval leader?

Benjamin Smith is a professor in the Department of Languages and Cultures at Minnesota State University Moorhead. His paper, Principles of Leadership in the Middle Ages: The case of Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar has been recommended by Medievalists.net.

Medieval religious building reflects modern conflict

In the 8th century, the caliphs of Cordoba, Spain constructed the magnificent great mosque. After their conquest, 13th century Christians rechristened the building a cathedral. Now the two cultures have begun to clash again over tourist signs.