Spanish

Santa Maria found?

“All the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is Columbus’ famous flagship, the Santa Maria,” said underwater archaeologist Barry Clifford about the discovery of what may be the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship off the coast of Haiti.

The Muwashshaha of al-Andalus research online

In a recent issue of the Falcon Banner, the news magazine of the Kingdom of Calontir, HE Qadiya Catalina de Arazuri shares her research for a Kingdom A&S entry: The Muwashshaha of al-Andalus.

Latest techniques used to help conserve ancient bridges

Researchers from the Applied Geotechnology Group at the University of Vigo in Spain are using the latest technology to study 80 Roman and medieval bridges to determine the original construction of the bridges and the best ways to conserve them.

"Clothing of al-Andalus" research paper

In a recent edition of the Falcon Banner, the online news magazine for the Kingdom of Calontir, HE Qadiya Catalina de Arazuri shares her research for the recent Kingdom A&S event on Clothing of al-Andalus.

Candelabra might be key to medieval Spanish navigation

In 1970, a diver off the coast of Spain found a rare 10th century bronze candelabra. Since then, experts have studied the artifact as verification of a trade routes between Spanish cities and southern France, a topic about which little is known.

Touring Judaic sites in Spain

After the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, much of Sephardic Jewish history and culture was destroyed, but some does remain. Gisela Dés of The Jerusalem Post offers a feature article on the "lost Jewish kingdom" in Spain.

Spanish medieval vineyard study opens "window to the past"

In the 10th century, Zaballa, Spain was a quiet village that cultivated vineyards on terraces. Then the rich folks arrived in the form of a manor monastery which created a "highly significant rent-seeking system," and then a "veritable factory, a specialised estate in the hands of local lords who tried to obtain the maximum profits possible." The town was abandoned in the 15th century.

Re-enactors to invade Menorca July 2014

Visitors to Spain's island of Menorca in July 2014 will receive a special treat when an historic re-enactment of the island’s invasion by Catalonian and Aragonese troops in the Middle Ages will take place in the capital's Plaza Conquesta.

Spanish fort in Appalachian Mountains

A team of archaeologists has discovered a Spanish fort built in the foothills of North Carolina's Appalachian Mountains by Spanish Captain Juan Pardo in 1567, nearly 40 years before Jamestown. Fort San Juan is now considered the earliest European fort constructed in the interior of the United States.

15th century plague hospital to be covered by Apple store

Some residents of Madrid are less than thrilled that a new Apple store will be opening atop the ruins of a 15th century plague hospital. The 20,000-square-foot store is scheduled to open its doors in December 2013, covering the ruins of the medieval building.

Introducing Hernán Cortés

Arguably, Hernán Cortés is the most famous - or infamous - of the Spanish explorers. Jessie Szalay, LiveScience Contributor, offers a biographical feature on the conqueror of the Aztec Empire and governor of New Spain.

Remains of Spanish Jews "well preserved"

In 2008, archaeologists unearthed a 13th century Jewish cemetery in Toledo, Spain. A comprehensive study of the burials was recently completed, identifying and cataloguing the 107 tombs. Experts declared the remains “well preserved” and deposited unusually deep in the ground.

Lost Cortés letter found

A letter from Charles V to Hernán Cortés, proclaiming him Governor of Mexico, has been found in the State Archive in Naples. The letter is one of the oldest sent to the New World.

Excavations underway at St. Augustine, Florida

In 1565, St. Augustine was founded and became the first continuously-occupied European settlement in what would later become the continental United States. For the past 37 years, archaeologist Dr. Kathy Deagan of the University of Florida has spent her summers excavating the area of the "Fountain of Youth" and learn more about the early Spanish settlement. (video)

[ATL] Sacred Stone Baronial Birthday 31

Sacred Stone Baronial Birthday 31

August 30-September 1, 2013
Elchenburg Castle at Boonville, NC

Greetings noble friends and neighbors!

We bid you welcome and hope you will join us on a trip to Morocco for the 31st anniversary of the founding of the Barony of the Sacred Stone.

Roman skeleton contains calcified ovarian tumor

Scientists from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain are studying the remains of a 5th century Roman woman found buried in a Roman cemetery in the archaeological site of La Fogonussa. The woman, aged 30 to 40 years, had suffered from an ovarian tumor.

Canada's Oldest Shipwreck to be Replicated

A 16th-century Basque whaling galleon, the San Juan, will be re-constructed full-scale and seaworthy.

15th-century prayer book highlights "the grandeur of Spanish-Jewish artwork"

A Jewish prayer book, created in 15th century Spain, is a survivor. The book includes liturgies for the Jewish New Year and Day of Atonement and managed to survive both the Inquisition and the Holocaust.

Rare evidence of medieval trepanation found in Spain

Trepanation, the practice of drilling holes into the skulls of living beings for medical or religious purposes, was rarely performed in the Middle Ages, but the discovery of two skulls in Spain, dating to the 13th or 14th centuries, has made experts scramble for an answer.

Spanish Inquisition follows priest to the New World

According to trial records, Catholic priest Pedro Ruiz Calderón not only practiced Black Magic, but he was really good at it. The trial took place as part of the Spanish Inquisition in Mexico City in 1540.

Theft of Codex Calixtinus alleged to be an inside job

Four people, including the former caretaker at Santiago de Compostela cathedral, have been arrested for the 2011 theft of the Codex Calixtinus Of Pope Calixtus II, a 12th-century collection of sermons and liturgical passages.

Five queens for Navarre

The June 2012 issue of History Today features an article, "The She-Wolves of Navarre," by Elena Woodacre which chronicles the lives of five queens of the kingdom of Navarre from 1274 to 1512.

Trepanned skulls found in Spain

Two skulls were found in Spain with holes drilled in them. The skulls were found in a cemetery that dates to the 13th and 14th centuries.

Evidence of early Jewish presence on Iberian Peninsula

Archaeologists have found the earliest evidence yet of Jews on the Iberian Penninsula. An excavation of a Roman villa in Portugal has revealed a marble slab, probably from a tombstone, with a Hebrew inscription dating to 390 CE.

16th century Spanish pattern book available online

The World Digital Library has posted a digital version of the Book on Geometry, Practice, and Patterns by Juan de Alcega. Published in 1580, the book offers techniques for ordering lengths of fabric based on the measurement of the "ell."

Brazilian shipwreck may be Spanish colonial supply ship

In 2005, a team of divers with the Barra Sul Project discovered the remains of a ship off the coast of Santa Catarina in Brazil. Now they believe that vessel may have been a lost supply ship sent by Spain to build two forts on the Strait of Magellan.

Isabel López before the inquisition

In September 1516, Judeo-conversa Isabel López, along with her mother María, was arrested by the Inquisition  in Cogolludo, Spain, observing the Sabbath by dressing in holiday garb and joining others to celebrate. Her trial is the subject of an article by Renée Levine Melammed for the Jerusalem Post Magazine.

[CAL] Layli al-Waqud

Welcome to Layli al-Waqud! Night of the Bonfires and Bardic Bedlam! Join the Shire of Crystal Mynes and the Shire March of the Grimfells for Layli al-Waqud, the Night of the Bonfires!  Featuring Bardic Bedlam!

“Ornament of the World” depicted in video on Moorish Spain

A medieval German traveler once described Granada, in Moorish Spain, as the “Ornament of the World.” A video posted on the Moroccan Design website showcases the beauty and enlightment of the region.

British crusaders conquered, then settled in Tortosa

In the mid12th century, English and Welsh crusaders took part in the siege and capture of the Spanish city of Tortosa. Some apparently liked the climate and decided to stay. In an article for the Journal of Medieval History, Antoni Virgili tells their story.