Islam

Scholar Examines Muhammed, Islam

"When the prophet Muhammad died in 632, a tempest of political intrigue and deceit blew over Islam, transforming it forever. In this fast-paced and compelling tale, travel writer Rogerson (author of The Prophet Mohammad) conducts us on a fascinating journey back to seventh-century Medina and the various schemes that led to the division of Islam into Shia and Sunni factions."

Art Institute of Chicago offers Islamic ceramics exhibit

From March 31 until October 28, 2007, the Art Institute of Chicago will present Perpetual Glory: Medieval Islamic Ceramics from the Harvey B. Plotnick Collection, a collection of medieval Islamic ceramics dating from the 9th-15th centuries.

"Lost" Islamic kingdom discovered

A team of French archaeologists have discovered three towns in the Rift Valley of Ethiopia which they believe are part of the "lost" Islamic kingdom of Shoa. The Muslim stronghold was an important stop on the trade route from the 10th to the 16th centuries.

Spain's Alhambra palace subject of Freer Gallery lecture

On Saturday April 7, 2007, Oxford University scholar Jeremy Johns will present a lecture on the Alhambra, the "best preserved palace of the medieval Islamic world," in the Meyer Auditorium of the Freer Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Turkish Archaeologist Not Anti-Islam, Court Finds

Muazzez Ilmiye Cig's research into ancient Sumer led her to the conclusion that headscarves were worn in that culture's sexual rites. But when she made this claim in her book, the 92-year-old archaeologist found herself in court accused of insulting Muslim women.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 10, 732

Charles Martel's forces won the Battle of Tours fought on October 10, 732. Gibbon and other traditional historians credit his victory with saving Christian Europe from Muslim domination.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 5, 610

In the process of deposing and replacing the Byzantine emperor Phocas, Heraclius attacked Constantinople with a fleet on October 5, 610 C.E.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 17, 1487

Ismail Shah, the ruler who converted Iran from Sunni to Shia Islam, was born on July 17, 1487.

Period Arabic Calligraphy at LOC

The Library of Congress has published a collection of 355 sheets of Arabic calligraphy from the 9th-19th centuries on its website. The site features digital reproductions of the manuscripts along with background material.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 14, 1325

On June 14, 1325, Ibn Batuta left his native Tangier on pilgrimage to Mecca. He was not to return for 29 years.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 28, 1291

On May 28, 1291, during the Siege of Acre, the temple of the Knights Templar was destroyed. With it went the crusading Knights' last foothold in the Holy Land.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 27, 1218

On May 27, 1218, the first ships of the Fifth Crusade reached Egypt.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 15, 756

On May 15, 756, Abd ar-Rahman was proclaimed Emir of Cordoba, beginning the three-century Umayyad dynasty of Moorish Spain.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 7, 558

On May 7, 558, the dome of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople collapsed after an earthquake.

Ownership Dispute Stops Auction of Mosque Beams

Christie's withdrew from auction five wooden beams from Cordoba's Great Mosque after questions arose about who rightfully owned them.

Valuable Jewish and Arabic Documents to be Preserved

Cambridge University has received a grant of nearly half a million pounds to conserve and digitize its Genizah Collection of medieval Arabic and Jewish documents.

Why the Crusades Still Matter

Two scholars discuss a historic flashpoint and its relevance today. Antonia Ryan conducted an e-mail exchange with two scholars of the Crusades -- one who writes about Christian perspectives and one who studies the Muslim experience of these medieval wars.

Starry-eyed Surprise: Medieval Astronomy

Dame Aoife brings us a veritable galaxy of links this week, concerning astronomy not only as a natural science but also as a medieval navigation and timekeeping aid.

Wine Snobbery: Blame it on the Romans

Tom Standage of the Herald Tribune looks at wine snobbery through the ages beginning with the Romans.

Imperial Turkish Costumes on Display

An exhibition of imperial Turkish robes and kaftans will be on display at the Smithsonian Institute's Sackler Gallery through January 22, 2006.

Textiles, Metalwork and Art from Ottoman Empire Now at Smithsonian

The weekend before Atenveldt and Gleann Abhann’s coronations, the first-ever international exhibition devoted to imperial Turkish robes, or kaftans, dating to the 16th-17th centuries, opened at the Smithsonian Institute’s Sackler Gallery.

"Crusades: Crescent and the Cross" on the History Channel

On November 6-7, 2005, the History Channel will present The Crusades: Crescent and the Cross, a "clear-eyed look at the first three crusades, the battle between the Crescent and the Cross, which still shapes the Middle East and relations between the two great religions in our present day world."

Moroccan City Holds Secrets from Roman Through Medieval Times

Moroccan archaeologists from the National Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Heritage are combing through research discovered during a recent excavation of the Roman city of Thamusida and its medieval layers up to Islamic times.

New Book Looks at Melting Pot of the Middle East

In a review for the New York Times, Robert D. Kaplan looks at Columbia University professor Mark Mazower's new book Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews, 1430-1950.

Medieval Muslim Cemetery Discovered

35 skeletons, discovered recently near Lisbon Portugal, are believed to be from one of the largest medieval Muslim burial grounds in Europe.

Exhibit on Islamic art now at the Kimbell

"Palace & Mosque: Islamic Art from the Victoria and Albert Museum" is on display through September 4 at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

Muslim Charity Claims Ownership of Taj Mahal

The Sunni Waqf Board, a Muslim charitable organization that oversees Muslim graveyards, has laid claim to India's Taj Mahal.

Turks Display 1000 Years of Turkish Art and Culture

Turks: A Journey of a Thousand Years, 600-1600 may be the world's greatest display of Turkish art and culture. The exhibit opened January 22, 2005 at London't Royal Academy of Arts.

Islamic Renaissance Workshop to be Presented in Maryland

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland will present "The Impact of Islamic Culture on the Arts of the Renaissance," a day-long workshop, on February 4, 2005.

New Yorker: History of the Crusades Explored

Two new books on the Crusades have hit the shelves. New Yorker writer Joan Acocella does the review.