Buddhism

Life of King Sawlu told on tablet

Archaeologists working at a site near Mandalay, Burma are excited by the discovery of a 900-year-old stone tablet describing the life of little known Burmese king Sawlu. The tablet acknowleges that the king "ruled the nation by the teachings of Lord Buddha" and mentions a monastery built by donations from Sawlu's wife. (photo)

Living the monastic life at Penn

In a world where the college experience usually involves football and parties, students of Justin McDaniel's religious studies class at the University of Pennsylvania should expect something differrent: a firsthand experience of what it's like to be a monk.

Archaeologists plan conservation of 8th century Buddhist university

For years, the ruins of Vikramshila university, an ancient seat of Buddhist learning in Bhagalpur, India, have been neglected. Now a team of archaeologists have decided to begin work on the "university" which once housed over 10,000 students.

Sackler Gallery receives collection of Tibetan Buddhist Art

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. has announced that it has received a collection of Tibetan Buddhist art from collector Alice S. Kandell. Objects in the collection date from the 12th through 20th centuries CE.

5th century Buddhist temple found in Afghanistan

Amidst the fighting south of Kabul, Afghanistan, comes a bright spot: the discovery of a Buddhist-era temple dating back to the 5th century.

Buddhist wall paintings pre-date western technique

Researchers studying 5th-9th century Buddhist cave paintings in the Afghan region of Bamiyan have learned that the paintings used an oil technique, centuries before the same technique was used in Europe.

Sacred Caves of the Silk Road

A recent issue of National Geographic visits the Mogao caves of Dunhuang, China. Located along the Silk Road, the Mogao caves are a series of man-made caves carved into the cliffs between the 6th and 14th centuries.

Archaeologists ponder "Secrets of Shangri-La"

Archaeologists believe they have found Shangra-La in the form of Himalayan caves holding wall paintings, illuminations and 15th century religious texts. (photos)

Pre-Islamic stupa marks site of Buddhist temple

A coral stupa, a mound-like structure supposedly containing relics of the Buddha, has been discovered in Raa atoll Agolhitheemu, in the Maldives Islands off the coast of India. The stupa may prove that the site was once a Buddhist temple which was destroyed when Islam came to the island.

6th century Sleeping Buddha escaped "wrath of the Taliban"

A 1500-year-old "Sleeping Buddha" statue has been found buried in Afghanistan near the site of the tragic destruction of two other statues seven years ago by Taliban extremists. The latest 62-foot long Buddha was found by a French-Afghan team.

Early Buddhist paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

An exhibit of early Buddhist manuscript paintings from India, many on dried palm leaves, is being hosted by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Early Buddhist Manuscript Painting: The Palm Leaf Tradition will be on display through March 22, 2009.

1200-year-old Leshan Buddha spared by earthquake

The devastating earthquake in China's southwestern Sichuan Province has spared the world's tallest statue of Buddha. The 71-meter tall Buddha, which is a world heritage site, draws millions of visitors to the province each year.

7th century Afghan oil paintings earliest discovered

Scientists working in the Bamiyan region of Afghanistan have discovered oil paintings on the walls of caves dating to the 7th centuries, 800 years before the earliest European oil paintings were created. (photos)

9th century Buddhist temple discovered in India

Workers on a construction site in Bhubaneswar, India have discovered the remains of a 9th century Buddhist monastery. Villagers have requested the preservation of the site.

12th century Buddha paintings found

A Nepalese shepherd led researchers to a cave where he had found cave-paintings of Buddha, including a 55-panel mural depicting the life of Buddha, dating back to at least the 12th century.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 11, 868

The earliest known printed book was created on May 11, 868 in China. The text was the Buddhist Diamond Sutra, a classic work of meditative Buddhism which stresses the importance of avoiding extremes of attachment.

Khyim Lha Khang / Kalet Ordu

The Spirit Horde, also known in Tibetan as Khyim Lha Khang and in Mongolian as Kalet Ordu, is an SCA Household in the Kingdom of Trimaris whose members share a common interest in Mongol/Tibetan history and culture.