First phase of St. Peter's Colonade restoration revealed

Rome Reports has released a sort video on YouTube showcasing the newly renovated left Colonnade at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

Reliquary holding relics of saint found in Perperikon

Archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov recently discovered a 5th century bronze reliquary containg a cross which held two fibers, either hair or textile, believed to have belonged to a saint.

Papers sought for "The Crusades and Visual Culture"

Elizabeth Lapina of Durham University in Great Britain reports that she is seeking papers and proposals for the upcoming publication, The Crusades and Visual Culture. The submission deadline is December 1, 2011.

[DRA] Stairway to Heaven

You find yourself looking through an art anthology or wandering through a museum. Here is wonderful documentation for your new purse, a gorgeous picture of a gentleman making shoes and... a guy on a grill? Who is he? And why is there a cute dragon at that lady's feet? And.. oh my, why does that man have his head under his arm? We will answer these questions and more at Stairway to Heaven.

Tale of a 15th century Spanish "conversa"

In an article for the Jerusalem Post, professor of Jewish history and dean at the Schechter Institute, Renee Levine Melamme tells the story of a family of 15th century "crypto-Jews" tried by the Spanish Inquisition in Ciudad Real.

Previously unknown medieval archbishopric discovered in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered two archbishop's seals during excavations of the city of Perperikon, a crucial urban center during the Middle Ages and the Byzantine and Bulgarian Empires. The two lead seals belonged to Constantine, Archbishop of Archidos.

New Welsh Pilgrim's Way inaugurated by 127 mile walk

The new Pilgrim's Way walking path in Wales was christened recently when 80 walkers began the 127-mile (204km), 12-day trek from Basingwerk Abbey in Holywell, Flintshire to Bardsey Island in Gwynedd. (slideshow)

Saint Philip's tomb discovered in Turkey

Archaeologists working in Pamukkale, Turkey believe they have found the tomb of St. Philip the Apostle. Pamukkale is the modern name of the ancient city of Hierapolis where Philip was killed.

Pilgrimage for the modern penitent

Walking to Compostella is so 1482! Today, pilgrims reach Santiago de Compostela by bicycle, bus, and even airplane. This is one of many ways that the famed Pilgrim route has adapted to the modern world.

Fresco of St. Paul found in Naples catacombs

A 6th century fresco of St. Paul has been discovered in the Catacombs of San Gennaro in Naples during restoration work according to L'Osservatore, the official Vatican newspaper. (photo)

33rd Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum call for papers

On April 20-21, 2012, Plymouth State University in central New Hampshire, will host the 33rd Annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum. The Forum is now accepting abstracts for papers to be presented at the conference.

Vatican documents online

A large selection of documents held by the Vatican have been released online at the Documenta Catholica Omnia. All material is in Latin.

16th century automaton replicates "prayer and trance"

Tradition says that a 16th century mechanical monk, now owned by the Smithsonian Institution, was created by Juanelo Turriano for Spanish Emperor Charles V. The monk walks, prays, and kisses a wooden cross. (photo and video)

Badge of St. Ursula found in England

A metal dectorist in Lancashire, England has unearthed a 500-year old pilgrim badge of St. Ursula. The badge came from her shrine in Cologne, Germany and is unique in Britain.

Ancient Ukraine comes to Houston

For the first time, many residents of the United States will be able to view Ukrainian treasures spanning 6,000 years. The exhibition will be hosted by the Houston (Texas) Museum of Natural Science from May 27 to Sept 5, 2011.

Did Giotto paint the shroud of Turin?

A new book by an Italian art historian claims that the Shoud of Turin is neither a biblical relic nor a medieval hoax, but a creation of the famous Rennaissance artist Giotto.

Prayer book and crucifix of Mary Queen of Scots reunited in Scotland

As she walked to the scaffold to be executed, Mary Queen of Scots carried an ornate crucifix and a Book of Hours. Now both artifacts, thought to have been carried by Mary, were reunited for a day at Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian. (photo)

Gregorian Chant sampler available for free at Amazon

Grimmund of the Kingdom of Northshield reports that is offering a sampler of Gregorian chant for free download. The download works with any MP3 player.

Want the severed head of a medieval saint? Act now while supplies last!

The (alleged) severed head of St. Vitalis of Assisi, a 14th century Italian monk, is being put up for auction in Ireland. The relic has been owned by a prominent Irish family since the 18th century.

The magnificent Aya Sofya

Undoubtedly, one of the greatest places of worship in history is the Aya Sofya, also known as Hagia Sophia or “Church of the Holy Wisdom.” Located in İstanbul, the church is visited by over two million tourists a year. Terry Richardson of Today's Zaman offers a history. (photo)

Coptic nuns deface Egyptian temple

The Egyptian gods must have been angry when 6th century Coptic nuns used the walls of their temple for personal comments. The graffiti has been discovered at the 3200-year-old temple at Abydos.

Norway's Borgund stave church one of the "10 most beautiful"

Egan reports that the Budget Travel Magazine is featuring an article on the "10 most beautiful churches." Among them is the 12th century Borgund stave church in Borgund Norway, a well-preserved example of "the integration of Christianity with Norse culture."

New pilgrim trail to cross Wales

"North Wales is a landscape charged with a history of faith, and this particular pilgrim route will be, for all who follow it, a true path towards the light, supported by all those living memories of prayer and holy lives," said Dr. Rowan Williams about the new pilgrim trail across Wales.

Tomb of St Francis of Assisi re-opens

A special Franciscan mass will celebrate the re-opening of the restored tomb of St Francis of Assisi in Umbria, Italy. The saint died in 1226. (photo)

Medieval art forum in Germany, September 2011

A open colloquium to discuss medieval art will offer researchers of many fields the opportunity to discuss their ideas. From September 21 to 24, 2011, the first Forum Medieval Art will take place in Halberstadt, Germany.

Baltimore museum hosts exhibit on reliquaries

Until May 15, 2011, the Walters Art museum in Baltimore, Maryland will host Treasures of Heaven: Saints, Relics and Devotion in Medieval Europe, "a fascinating array of objects tracing the evolution and permutations of reliquaries from late antiquity to the Renaissance."

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Mysterious Irish brooch has link to Greece

In 2011, a woman cutting turf in a family bog at Tullahennell North, Ireland, discovered what proved to be a 7th century brooch bearing the Greek symbol for Christ. Now researchers have linked the pin to a Christian community with ties to Greece. (photo)

6th century Ethiopian manuscript identified in Minnesota

A theology student has discovered the second-oldest known Ethiopic Old Testament at Saint John’s University in Minnesota (USA). The manuscript dates to the 6th century.

"Magically gorgeous objects:" beginning of modern art

Understanding the medieval mindset that placed magical value on sacred objects, such as relics and talismans, may be difficult for the modern public, but no one can dispute the beauty of such works of art. (photos)