Christianity

1,000-Year-Old Church Discovered in Norway

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a nearly 1,000-year-old church in Skien, Norway, the country's oldest found to date. The discovery may prove that Christian conversions occured earlier than expected.

Michaelangelo's Anatomy Lesson

Two Brazilian doctors who are also art lovers think they have uncovered a "secret lesson" in human anatomy in the famous Sistine Chapel frescos.

A Man Walked into the Casbah: 13th Century Persian Jokes

Humor is ageless, or so believes John Emerson in his weblog 700 Year Old Jokes, a collection of humorous stories from a 13th century Persian Bishop.

"Da Vinci Code" Banned from Westminster Abbey

Producers of the film version of Dan Brown's bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code have hit another roadblock. Officials of London's Westminster Abbey have refused to allow the production crew to film there.

New Book Looks at Melting Pot of the Middle East

In a review for the New York Times, Robert D. Kaplan looks at Columbia University professor Mark Mazower's new book Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims and Jews, 1430-1950.

Reality Series Looks at Monastic Life

The Monastery, a new series airing on the BBC, challenges modern men to live the lives of medieval monks in the Benedictine Worth Abbey in Sussex, England.

"Kingdom of Heaven" Documentary on A&E

"Kingdom of Heaven," a documentary about the upcoming film depicting the 12th century Crusade, will debut on A&E May 4, 2005.

Funeral of Pope John Paul II Fuels Interest in Vestments

The funeral of Pope John Paul II has sparked much interest in the history of the papacy. In an interview for NPR's Morning Edition, Renee Montagne discusses papal vestments with Father Mark Frances.

St. John's Bible on display in Minneapolis

"Illuminating the Word: The Saint John's Bible" will be on display at the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts through July 3.

"Kingdom of Heaven" Sparks Copyright Controversy

Kingdom of Heaven, the historical epic about the Third Crusade scheduled to be released this spring, is the subject of a copyright controversy in which author James Reston Jr. accused film director Ridley Scott of stealing his research.

Shroud of Turin Factsheet

Live Science, an online magazine, looks at the history of the Shroud of Turin and offers a factsheet with established facts about the Shroud.

St. John's Bible to be Displayed in Minneapolis

The St. John's Bible, a modern work being created by period means, will go on display at the Minneapolis Institute of Art April 10, 2005.

Villagers Save Historic Medieval Church

All Saints' Church in Beckingham, England has been saved thanks to community efforts which secured a grant from English Heritage.

Farmer's Field Reveals 14th Century Secret

Ten feet beneath a farmer's field near Linlithgow, Scotland lies a secret: a network of 14th century sandstone tunnels.

Codex Sinaiticus to be Digitized

The Codex Sinaiticus, the earliest copy of the New Testament, is scheduled to be digitized and published on CD-ROM.

Jerusalem Post: Acre Crusader Site to be Opened to the Public

Sections of an 800-year-old archaeological site in the city of Acre have been scheduled to open to the public in June of 2005.

Catholic News: Tomb of St. Paul Found?

The Vatican has announced that a team of archaeologists have discovered what they believe is the tomb of St. Paul in Rome's St. Paul Outside the Walls Basilica.

Heloise and Abelard Still Inspire Lovers

An essay in the New York Times by Cristina Nehring discusses five books on Heloise and Abelard.

"Da Vinci Code" Put on Trial

A museum in Lornardo Da Vinci's hometown Vinci, Italy, is holding a trial to sort out the facts from fiction in Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code.

Times: Author claims St. Patrick took bribes from Christian converts

In his book Secret Sights II: Unknown Medieval Ireland, author Rob Vance accuses St. Patrick of taking bribes from his wealthy female patrons.

Norway's Oldest Church Discovered

Norwegian archaeologists are excited by the discovery of what is probably the country's oldest church. Located in the city of Skien, the church is believed to have been built in the 11th century.

Milan Calls Da Vinci Poster "Blasphemous"

City fathers in Milan, Italy have banned a French clothing company's advertisement featuring an all-female version of Da Vinci's famous painting of the Last Supper.

Rosslyn Chapel May be Re-Created Outside of Scotland

The producers of the Da Vinci Code movie may choose to build their own version of Rosslyn Chapel rather than deal with restrictions imposed by the building's trustees.

Macclesfield Psalter to Remain in England

A last-minute effort to save importation of the 14th century Macclesfield Psalter has been successful. The manuscript will be retained by the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge.

New Study Re-Dates Shroud of Turin

A new study to date the controversial Shroud of Turin places the cloth as much older than previously believed.

Groundhog Day

No, this message isn't going to repeat in an endless loop.... Curious about the medieval origins of Groundhog Day. Dame Aoife has found the answer.

Please Pass the Psalt!

Dame Aoife discusses Medieval Psalters in this week's edition of Aoife's Links.

Knights Templar Demand Apology

The grand master of the Knights Templar has sent a letter to the Vatican demanding an apology for persecution of the group during the 14th century.

James Ossary Discoverer Charged with Forgery

An Israeli collector has been charged with forgery in the case of the "James Ossary," the burial box of the brother of Jesus.

"Life of Brian" Scene Voted Funniest Ever

John Cleese's famous rant "What have the Romans done for us?" in the Monty Python film The Life of Brian has been voted the funniest movie scene ever.