Christianity

"Da Vinci Code" Leads to Rosslyn Vandalism

Dan Brown is not a popular name at Rosslyn Chapel in Scotland. The fame — or notoriety — of Brown's Da Vinci Code has led some to try to breach the chapel's secret vaults.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 9, 1365

King Pedro of Castile, called "the Cruel," was excommunicated by the Pope on June 9, 1365 for his treatment of the clergy.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 5, 709

St. Boniface and his missionary companions were killed by pagan Germans on June 5, 709.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 28, 1291

On May 28, 1291, during the Siege of Acre, the temple of the Knights Templar was destroyed. With it went the crusading Knights' last foothold in the Holy Land.

"Da Vinci Code" Renews Interest in the Grail

The popularity of Dan Brown's Da Vinci Code has sparked interest in grail legends, according to scholars. An MSNBC article looks the various ways the grail has popped up in literature over the centuries.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 27, 1218

On May 27, 1218, the first ships of the Fifth Crusade reached Egypt.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 25, 735

On May 25, 735, the Venerable Bede ended his peaceful, learned life in the Northumbrian monastery where he had lived over fifty years.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 14, 964

Pope John XII died in his mistress' house on May 14, 964.

Monks Began English Gardening Tradition

Monasteries were a stronghold of medieval gardening in Europe. The manual labor of gardening taught humility and thus benefited the monks' souls, while the herbs and vegetables they grew aided their health.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 8, 1373

Seriously ill, Dame Julian of Norwich had a series of visions of Christ's love on May 8, 1373. She spent years in contemplation of their meaning, finally producing Revelations of Divine Love, the first known English book written by a woman.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 7, 558

On May 7, 558, the dome of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople collapsed after an earthquake.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 2, 907

Boris I of Bulgaria died on May 2, 907.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 29, 1429

On April 29, 1429, Joan of Arc attacked the besieging English at Orleans.

Judge in DaVinci Code case creates code of his own

Bored with solving The DaVinci Code from Dan Brown's bestselling book? Try solving The Smithy Code, created by the judge in a copyright case involving the book.

Music for Sant'Iago

On Saturday May 6, 2006, the Medieval Women's Choir at St. James Cathedral in Seattle, Washington will present Music for Sant'Iago (St. James), a concert of music and stories "associated with the famous pilgrimage route to the shrine of Saint James."

The Winchester Pilgrimage

The Shire of West Dragoningshire will sponsor a period pilgrimage in Winchester, England May 12-15, 2006.

York Claims Emperor Constantine

More than a statue salutes the Roman Emperor Constantine in York, England. A major exhibit of treasures, including a sculpted marble head of the emperor, will be on display in the city until October 2006.

Largest Medieval Parish Cemetery Outside London Excavated

Members of the University of Leicester archaeology unit are excavating a large parish cemetery containing over 1,300 skeletons that date from between 1200 and 1600 CE.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 17, 1521

Already excommunicated, Martin Luther appeared before the Emperor on April 17, 1521 at Worms to answer for his views.

Remains of Knights Templar Discovered in Israel

Archaeologists have discovered the first provable remains of Knights Templar buried beneath a crusader castle in Israel.

14th Century Palace Located Outside Glasgow

After decades of searching, the ruins of the Bishop of Glasgow's palace have been discovered outside the city. The 13th century building stood for three centuries before being destroyed in the Reformation.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 16, 1209

Traditionally, April 16, 1209 is regarded as the day Pope Innocent III gave oral permission of St. Francis of Assisi to found the Franciscan order.

Templar Castle on the Market

For sale: Knights Templar Castle in Barnton, Edinburgh, Scotland. Great for studying the Da Vinci Code.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 13, 1111

On April 13, 1111, Henry V, King of Germany, was crowned Holy Roman Emperor after maneuvering that included capturing Pope Paschal II and deposing his own father.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 12, 1334

Giotto di Bondone was appointed Chief Architect of Florence Cathedral on April 12, 1334. He designed a bell tower for the Cathedral, but it was not finished until after his death.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 7, 1506

Today is the 500th anniversary of the birth of St. Francis Xavier. The Spanish-born missionary studied at the University of Paris and was one of the seven priests who joined Ignatius Loyola to found the Jesuit order.

6th Century Pyramid Found under Mexican Passion Play Site

As many as a million Mexicans have watched an annual reenactment of the crucifixion of Christ unaware that a pyramid of the Teotihuacan culture lay under the soil on which they stood.

Winchester Pilgrimage

description:
The Shire of West Dragoningshire invites all lords, barons, knights, squires, along with their ladies and all other gentles of any station to join them in the Winchester Pilgrimage, 12-14 May 2006.

Nestled in the water meadows alongside the River Itchen, in the shadow of St Catherine's Hill and only 20 minutes walk from the centre of Winchester, lies the medieval buildings of the Hospital of St Cross & Almshouse of Noble Poverty. Location:
Shire of West Dragoningshire (Winchester, England)

University of New Mexico to Host Medieval Lecture Series

The University of New Mexico's Institute for Medieval Studies will host Medieval Innovations: How the Middle Ages Changed Western Culture, a series of six lectures and a concert, Monday, April 3-6, 2006 on the university's main campus in Albuquerque.

Early Coptic Manuscript Found in Egypt

A cache of 6th century Coptic manuscripts has been discovered at the Monastery of Deir al-Surian in western Egypt. The find includes a single completed manuscript and hundreds of fragments from the 6th through 10th centuries CE.