Canterbury Cathedral in crisis

England's Canterbury Cathedral has launched an international fundraising campaign in a effort to raise more than UK£50m necessary for urgent repairs.

Saint Nicholas honored by exhibit in Bari, Italy

An exhibition of artwork depicting Saint Nicholas will be on display in Bari, Italy, the saint's resting place. Saint Nicholas, Art Masterpieces in East and West is jointly organized by the Bari Municipality, the district of Puglia, the Bari University, the local Department of Archaeology, the Archbishopric of Bari and the metropolitan church of Saint Nicholas in Bari, and will be on display until May 6, 2007.

Bones probably not those of Joan of Arc

Eighteen experts, working to determine if a rib bone and a piece of cloth belonged to St. Joan of Arc, have not completely finished their task but now feel that "there is relatively little chance that the remnants are hers."

Devil's Music in the Vatican

Rock and roll music will represent Hell in a new opera based upon Dante's medieval epic, The Divine Comedy. The composition by Monsignor Marco Frisina will premiere in Vatican City.

Hymns and carols of Christmas

Douglas D. Anderson has created a website of ancient Christmas music "to preserve the rich history of Christmas carols and hymns which might otherwise be lost." The site includes both lyrics and MIDI files of the music.

Santa's sleigh or Thor's chariot?

"The idea of St Nicholas got very much mixed in with Thor's transport when it comes to the sled with flying reindeer," said Helge Soerheim of the Archaeological Museum in Stavanger. On December 21, 2006, IC Wales explored the idea of how Vikings might have celebrated the Christmas season.

Snorri Sturluson was wrong

A new investigation of the cathedral in Trondheim, Norway, has revealed that Icelandic literary hero Snorri Sturluson had been wrong in his documentation of the cathedral’s history.

Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna Exhibits 'Christ ist geboren' - illumination and yule

Since the first of December a new interesting exhibition is on display at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna: Christ ist geboren - Prachthandschriften zum Weihnachtsfest. The exhibit runs until 14 January, 2007.

Christian meets Celt in Scottish mythology

Scotland's place in world mythology is explored in an article by Diane MacLean for the Scotsman. Was King Arthur a Scot? Is the blood of Jesus in Scotland, and is Scotland really the lost city of Atlantis?

Early Christian graves discovered in the Ukraine

Early Christian burials dating to the 11th and 13th centuries have been found in Chernihiv in the Ukraine. Experts believe that the 30 tombs prove that the city was important in early Russian history.

Celibacy Requirement for Priests May Be Reconsidered

In the Middle Ages, celibacy for the clergy was not universally enforced. Now a Roman Catholic Cardinal suggests that the Church might take a fresh look at the issue.

Satan Getting Press: New Books about the Devil

"As anybody who has seen the recent Meryl Streep movie The Devil Wears Prada knows, Satan is back in vogue. It is unsurprising, then, that some of the Devil’s sparkle has rubbed off in Western universities."

Joan of Arc Relic Authenticity in Doubt

A piece of bone and fragment of blackened cloth preserved in France since the fifteenth century may not be authentic relics of St. Joan. A new scientific examination of the items raises questions.

Saint Paul's Tomb Found?

Archaeologists in Rome believe that they have discovered the tomb of St. Paul the Apostle. A sarcophagus, which may contain the remains of the saint, was unearthed at the St. Paul Outside the Walls basilica.

Swedish Christmas Goat - Centuries Old Tradition

Each year for the last 40 years, the centuries-old symbol of Christmas in Sweden, a huge straw goat, has been built in Gavle, Sweden. Only 10 of them have seen the new year; the rest have been torched, run over by cars, knocked over or otherwise destroyed by vandals.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 7, 1539

On December 7, 1539, Martin Luther granted Philip, Landgrave of Hesse a confessor's dispensation to marry a second wife, although his first wife was still living and not divorced. Christine of Saxony, described as "unattractive and sickly," apparently favored her husband's plan to marry again.

Burial Site Discovery Pushes Back Date of Christianity in Britain

A Christian grave discovered near St-Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London, indicates that Christianity may have come to Albion much earlier than previously supposed.

Medieval Healing Icon to be Displayed in Bulgaria

A sacred icon depicting Saint Kliment Ohridski, dating from the Middle Ages, will be on display in Sofia, Bulgaria November 25, 2006.

Web preview created for Caidan fundraising calendar

A web site has been created for the highly-successful "Benedictions: A Caidan Calendar of Chivalry and Sainthood". The calendar's sales are a fundraiser to benefit Caid's kingdom coffers, which suffered substantial losses due to the cancellation of this year's Great Western War.

Missals on display at the Walters

"'For This Is My Body': The Medieval Missal" will be on display at the Walters Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, through January 28.

"Gates of Paradise" to Tour USA

Lorenzo Ghiberti's immense gilded doors, completed in 1452 and nicknamed the "Gates of Paradise," will tour the United States beginning in April 2007. The intricately decorated doors are 20 feet high and weigh three tons.

English Monastery Nominated for World Heritage Status

The Venerable Bede's monastic home has been put forward as a possible UNESCO World Heritage Site. If selected, it will gain that status in 2009.

In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., in association with the Bodleian Library, will present In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 15, 1518

On October 15, 1518, Martin Luther was summoned before a Papal legate in Augsburg, Germany, but refused to recant his 95 Theses.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 10, 732

Charles Martel's forces won the Battle of Tours fought on October 10, 732. Gibbon and other traditional historians credit his victory with saving Christian Europe from Muslim domination.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 6, 1536

William Tyndale, Bible translator and Protestant scholar, was executed for heresy on October 6, 1536. He was condemned to burn at the stake, but was mercifully strangled first and his body burned after death.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 5, 610

In the process of deposing and replacing the Byzantine emperor Phocas, Heraclius attacked Constantinople with a fleet on October 5, 610 C.E.

Roman Villa Discovered in Turkey

A 3rd century Roman villa has been discovered in the ancient city of Laodiceia near Denizli, Turkey. Archaeologists believe the home, which contains mosaic floors, may have belonged to a rich farmer.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 27, 1540

The Pope issued a bull establishing Ignatius Loyola's new Society of Jesus (the Jesuit order) on September 24, 1540. The Society was and still is answerable directly to the Pope himself.

New Claim for Authenticity of Shroud of Turin

Australian researcher Brendan Whiting feels he has evidence that can prove that the Shroud of Turin dates to the time of Christ. Whiting published his findings in a new book, The Shroud Story.