Christianity

Inquisition "wasn't so bad after all" according to Vatican

The Vatican has created an exhibit to convince the Faithful that the Inquisition "wasn't so bad after all." The temporary Rare and Precious exhibition at Rome's Vittoriano Museum is designed to "expose some myths about this dark chapter of its past."

YouTube clip wins recording contract for Cistercian monks

Executives from Universal Music were "blown away" after hearing the voices of monks singing in a Cistercian monastery near Vienna, Austria on a YouTube video clip. The record producers had been looking for a group to record Gregorian chants, which have become popular.

"The Quest" follows journey of the Templars

The Quest, a Classic Media Group production, follows the journey of the Knights Templar through Europe by studying the work of archaeologists, anthropologists and historians.

Knights Templar petition to restore the Order

An odd advertisement appeared March 18, 2008 in the London Daily Telegraph. Titled "The Ancient & Noble Order of The Knights Templar," the ad announced that the Order "would petition the Pope to 'restore the Order with the duties, rights and privileges appropriate to the 21st century and beyond.'"

"Oops!" Shroud of Turin washed with a red shirt

Vatican City has announced that the venerable Shroud of Turin has been turned pink when it was accidentally washed with a red shirt. "Simply because the shroud has been given a slight pinkish tint does not in any way diminish its sanctity," Vatican spokesman Cardinal Giovanni Lajolo said during a press conference held to address the spiritual repercussions of the shroud's staining.

Rare Anglo-Saxon grave markers found in cathedral walls

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of rare Anglo-Saxon grace markers in the walls of Peterborough Cathedral. The markers, which are believed to date from the 11th century, were discovered during restoration work to the cathedral.

Fra' Bertie, Knights of Malta leader, dies

His Most Eminent Highness Fra' Andrew Bertie, the first Englishman to lead the Knights of Malta, has died, leaving the Order to select its new Grand Master.

Shroud of Turin photographed in HD

Church leaders and scientists will have a new opportunity to study the famous Shroud of Turin which is rarely seen by the public. The Shroud was recently photographed in high definition, creating a 12.8 billion-pixel image.

Shroud of Turin to be retested

Professor Christopher Ramsey, the director of the Oxford University Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, is hoping to run new tests on the Shroud of Turin. He believes that tests run in 1988 to date the relic may have been contaminated.

Choral sounds from the Male Choir of St. Petersburg (Russia)

A video on YouTube features the Male Choir of St. Petersburg, Russia, an a capella choir of 25 singers who will be making their American debut in 2009.

Stanford professor helps to preserve Gregorian chant

Stanford University Professor William Mahrt has dedicated his life to the study and preservation of Gregorian chant as director of the the St. Ann Choir of at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Palo Alto, California.

Holy Grail discovery claimed in the Louvre

Glasgow historian Mark Oxbrow believes he has found the real Holy Grail in - of all places - the Louvre in Paris. Oxbrow believes it is a "green gem-encrusted serving dish which he thinks could have been used at the Last Supper."

Six medieval bishops identified in Scotland

Radiocarbon dating was used recently to help identify the remains of six bishops found buried in at Whithorn Priory in Galloway, Scotland. The skulls dated from between 1200-1360 CE. (photos)

"Crazy Days" characterize German Fasching

Gael Stirler shares research on medieval holiday season of Fasching, celebrated for more than three months from mid-November until Easter in southern Germany. Also known as the Tolle Tagge (Crazy Days), Fasching can trace its roots back to the 4th century.

"Holy Blood and the Holy Grail" author dies at 64

Author Richard Leigh, best known as one of the co-authors of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, has died in London at the age of 64. The nonfiction work proposed that Jesus Christ fathered a child and that the bloodline continues.

Archaeologists search for abbott's grave at Hulton Abbey

A team of archaeologists from Keele University are using the latest geophysical equipment to search the grounds of Hulton Abbey in England hoping to find the graves of the monks who lived there as far back as the 13th century.

Rare 14th century statue found in Czech Republic

Archaeologists working on a site near Usti nad Labem in North Bohemia have discovered a ceramic statue of the Virgin Mary and Jesus dating to the late 14th century.

Touring Great Britain's cathedral towns

Planning to visit the UK over the holidays to drink in the historic atmosphere and sing a few carols? Harriet O'Brien offers The Complete Guide to Cathedral Cities in the UK.

"History of Holidays" on the History Channel website

The History Channel has created a website with interactive links covering the history of all the major holidays on the calendar.

Viscount Galen of Bristol's blog

Personal blog by Viscount Galen of Bristol of the Middle Kingdom, formerly of Ansteorra, Drachenwald, and Meridies.

Mysterious runestone identified

Experts believe that they have identified a mysterious runestone discovered under the floor of Hausken Church in Rennesøy, Rogaland, Norway.

Early Christian Art showcased in Venice

An new exhibit, Early Christian Art Between Rome and Byzantium, will showcase over 90 works from twenty Italian museums at the Intesa San Paolo's Palazzo Leoni Montanari. The show runs until November 18, 2007.

St Teilo's Church opens after relocation

The Archbishop of Canterbury has opened a 13th century church which was relocated from its original site in Pontarddulais near Swansea, Wales to the National History Museum in St Fagansa.

Vatican publishes documents from Knights Templar heresy trials

The Vatican is finally publishing Processus Contra Templarios, the report from the heresy trials of the Knights Templar that was lost in the Vatican secret archives for 700 years due to a filing error.

Tourists flock to churches built by angels

Legend says that the churches carved into the red rock of Lalibela, Ethiopia were built with the help of the angels. Now tourists have discovered one of the country's holiest sites.

Revisionist Joan of Arc angers historians

A new book by French journalist Marcel Gay claims to prove that Joan of Arc was a French royal who did not die on the stake but was rescued by the English.

Some relics of St. Francis probably did not belong to the saint

Carbon dating done on relics of St. Francis of Assisi have given mixed results. While a tunic, belt and mortuary cushion were dated to the right time period, another tunic, which the church attributes to the saint, did not.

Remembering the Templars

description:
Remembering the Templars: 700 years of History and Myth, as this event is called, takes a look at the trial, dissolution and the subsequent mythology of the Knights Templar. This all day event is free and open to the public, and will take place from 11:00 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on the California University of Pennsylvania main campus.

Malcolm Barber, University of Reading, will give a key Location:
California University (Borough of California, Pennsylvania)

Monks not included...

The Hermitage (Eremo), a 13th century monastery located near Cupramontana, Italy, is for sale complete with world famous botanical garden...but no monks.

New Da Vinci code theory causes stir on the internet

Demand for information about a new theory by amateur scholar Slavisa Pesci pertaining to the meaning of Da Vinci's last supper painting has caused crashes of several internet sites.