601 CE and Earlier

The Santa marker and the richness of Scottish DNA

Somewhere is Scotland exists one man who carries Santa's DNA, the NM46 marker traced to eastern Siberia and to Lapland, Santa Claus's legendary home. The unidentified man, so far the only one recorded in Scotland, may find himself visited by a relative on Christmas Eve.

"Wow is there a tower" in Alderney!

A team from the Guernsey Museums and the Alderney Society in England has identified a Roman fort concealed in a ruin called the Nunnery. The site is believed to be one of the "best-preserved Roman military structures in the world."

December 25 as Christmas

Scholar Andrew McGowan offers a paper on the Dating of Christmas on the Academia.edu website. Originally published as How December 25th Became Christmas, a 2002 edition of Bible Review, the paper is available in PDF format.

Early Roman burials wow Cirencester experts

Neil Holbrook, chief executive at Cotswold Archaeology, said he "can't underestimate the potential significance" of the discovery of more than 40 graves, dating to early Roman times, in Cirencester, England.

Artifacts spanning 23 centuries declared treasure in Norwich, England

A recent inquest in Norwich, England has resulted in a number of artifacts, dating from 800 BCE through the 15th century CE, being declared treasure. The six groups of treasures were all discovered by metal detector enthusiasts. (photo)

Bath baths in jeopardy

Experts working on the Roman baths in Bath, England, hope that drilling a new borehole will save the hot springs used by the Romans from a geyser that could drain the historic baths.

Istanbul's Hagia Sophia might return to place of worship

The 6th century Byzantine marvel, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, may be returning to its orgins as a place of worship by once again becoming a mosque. The former church is now a museum.

Orkney Hood re-created

"The project took five and half months and a total of 230 hours to actually make it. But it is fascinating to do something like that. We have not got any garments at all like this, only scraps if we are lucky," said experimental archaeologist Jacqui Wood about her re-creation of the Orkney Hood.

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

"Mysterious" Silk Road city found

Chinese archaeologists believe they have discovered evidence of an important Silk Road city which disappeared in the 3rd century CE.

Archaeologists apply for funding at West Cumbrian site

A team of archaeologists led by Grampus Heritage has applied for UK£200,000 in funding from the Heritage Lottery for a three-year project to escavate Roman remains at Cockermouth and Papcastle in West Cumbria, England where a building thought to be a Roman bath was recently discovered.

Roman medical kit offers insight into Greek influence

Over two thousand years ago, a Roman ship sank off the coast of Italy, near the island of Elba. Among the items on the ship was an ancient medical kit containing a mortar and pestle set, medicine spatulas, and pills and tablets that are surprisingly similar to our modern ones.

60 pairs of Roman shoes found at Scottish supermarket site

One of the largest caches of Roman shoes and sandals ever found in Scotland was discovered recently in Camelon, Scotland when workers at a supermarket construction site unearthed the footwear.

Vindolanda: What I did on my summer vacation

Writer Chris Rowe, winner of a recent Just Back article-writing contest for the travel page of the Telegraph, chronicles a summer-school visit to Vindolanda, the famous Roman fort near Hadrian's Wall in the north of England.

Israeli bus station site of Byzantine houses

More than 70 workers are busy excavating an area beneath the Central Bus Station in Be'er Sheva, Israel. Thus far, the experts have identified the remains of several houses dating to the Byzantine area.

Possible Roman Imperial shipyard discovered in Italy

Experts have discovered a huge building near the center of the complex at the ancient port of Rome which they believe was used for the maintenance of ships. If correct, the building would be part of the Roman Imperial shipyard, the "largest of its kind in Italy or the Mediterranean."

Roman baths discovered in London

Builders of a new office block in the Southwark district of London will not see their dreams realized until they have determined what to do with the remains of a Roman bath house, complete with cold plunge bath and hypocaust heating system. (photo)

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

The Pictish beast stone of Moray Firth

Isobel Henderson found something cruious - and exciting - in a stone wall on a Highland farm building near Moray Firth, Scotland: a Pictish beast stone dating to the 5th-7th centuries. The stone is carved with a beast, crescent, comb and mirror. (photo)

The search for the Stirling Roman road

The site of the new visitor center at Bannockburn, Scotland may hold more history than just the battlefield. Archaeologists are looking for evidence of a Roman road which is believed to have run through the site.

Welsh Iron Age tomb links to Stonehenge

Archaeologists working at the Carn Menyn site in the Preseli Hills in Wales, where the Stonehenge bluestones were quarried, believe they have found the tomb of one of original builders monument.

Golden torcs bring finder £462,000 reward

David Booth is a happy man. The hoard of gold Iron Age torcs he discovered with a metal detector in 2009, were last year's most valuable treasure reported to the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer, bringing the finder a reward of £462,000. (photo)

Investor wanted for £2m Hadrian's Wall project

Hadrian's Wall Heritage is hoping to attract an investor with the funds to construct a new visitor center at the Bowness House Farm in Bowness-on-Solway, England, the eastern end of the 84-mile (135km) Hadrian's Wall trail.

Trade between Romans and Picts verified in Scotland

An archaeological team from the Strathearn Environs and Royal Forteviot (SERF) project has proven the existance of trade between the Romans and the Picts with the discovery of an Iron Age broch containing trade items.

Gladiator amphitheatre and training school unearthed near Vienna

A team of archaeologists has discovered the remains of a Roman amphitheatre, on par with the Colosseum in Rome, near Vienna, Austria. The site, they believe, was also a training school for gladiators.

Reliquary holding relics of saint found in Perperikon

Archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov recently discovered a 5th century bronze reliquary containg a cross which held two fibers, either hair or textile, believed to have belonged to a saint.

The sounds of Stonehenge

Visitors to Stonehenge never have the opportunity to experience the monument the way their early ancestors would have, but now BBC accoustic engineers have re-created the sound of a ritual held 4,000 years ago.

Druid pleads for "founding fathers" of Stonehenge

In 2008, the remains of 40 bodies, thought to be at least 5,000 years old, were removed from Stonehenge for scientific study. Recently, in court, a Druid named King Arthur Pendragon pleaded to ''Let those we lay to rest, stay in rest."

Trinity College less than impressed with Dr. Barbarian's academic credentials

Trinity College of Dublin, Ireland has removed a web page in its professor profiles section belonging to one “Dr. Conan T. Barbarian, B.A. (Cimmeria) Ph.D. (UCD). F.T.C.D. (Long Room Hub Associate Professor in Hyborian Studies and Tyrant Slaying).”

Previously unknown medieval archbishopric discovered in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered two archbishop's seals during excavations of the city of Perperikon, a crucial urban center during the Middle Ages and the Byzantine and Bulgarian Empires. The two lead seals belonged to Constantine, Archbishop of Archidos.