601 CE and Earlier

Roman mosaic corridor to go on display in Gloucestershire

Victorian excavations at the site of the Chedworth Roman Villa in Gloucestershire, England led to some surprises, including a 35m (115ft) long Roman mosaic floor, "one of the longest in-situ corridor mosaics in the country." Soon the mosaic will be displayed for the public. (photo)

Roman brothel coin first of its kind found in Britain

London pastry chef Regis Cursan must have been surprised by his discovery of an ancient coin near Putney Bridge in West London, especially since the coin "depicts a man and a woman engaged in an intimate act." (photos)

"Bruises and bloody noses are part of the deal" at Trier's gladiator school

Residents of Trier, Germany's oldest city, have become accustomed to the sounds of battle cries and metal on metal as more and more citizens join the city's gladiator school in its 2000-year-old Roman arena.

Early Christian art on display in New York

Visitors to New York City with an interest in Byzantine or Early Christian art may want to pay a visit to the Onassis Cultural Center in Midtown Manhattan to view Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd – 7th Century AD, a display of 170 pieces of art from museums in Greece and Cyprus.

Wroxeter’s Roman Town House copes with tourist increase

When Channel Four TV challenged a team of builders to construct a Roman town house, it never expected the crowds of visitors to converge on the site, leading English Heritage to require emergency repairs. The Roman Town House was the subject of the Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day program. (video)

Evidence suggest that London was built by Iceni slaves

An essay from a recent issue of British Archaeology suggests that the city of London was  built as a military base by the captured Iceni tribesmen of rebel Queen Boudica, who were then executed. Author Dominic Perring bases his theory on the discovery of hundreds of skulls of young males.

Byzantine oil jar suggests trade Mediterranean

The Israel Antiquities Authority reports that remnants of a Byzantine oil jar, dating to the 6th century, has been found on Netanya's Poleg beach. The presence of the large jar suggests trade in olive oil along the Israeli coast. (photo)

Roman cockerel found in child's grave in Cirencester

Archaeologist Neil Holbrook, chief executive at Cotswold Archaeology, called the discovery of an 1,800-year-old enamelled cockerel figurine in the grave of a child a "most spectacular" find. The figurine is believed to have religious significance. (photo)

Jewish bread stamp found in Acre

In the Israeli city of Acre around 500 CE, Larry the Baker left his mark. A ceramic Byzantine bread stamp has been unearthed bearing the classic Jewish seven branch Menorah and the name "Laurentius" written out in Greek letters.

Restored Roman helmet to go on display

A Roman helmet found in Leicestershire, England is going on display after a 10 year restoration effort. The elaborate helmet dates to the 1st century CE.

British Museum given "gifts to the gods"

Curators at the British Museum are happy to accept a collection of "over 3,000 objects including coinage, jewellery, furniture fittings and pottery vessels" thrown in the River Tees at Piercebridge in Roman times as gifts to the gods. (photos)

Roman wine not to be opened before its time

Curators at the Historical Museum of the Palatinate in Speyer, Germany know they have a well-aged wine, but are unwilling to crack open the bottle for a taste. The vintage in question is a 4th century wine found in a Roman grave, which has stood in the same spot in the museum for 100 years.

Roman ring awarded to Welsh museum

The British Museum has given a Roman ring, found on Cefn Brithdir in Wales, to the Winding House Museum at New Tredegar for permanent display. The ring was discovered by a metal detectorist. (photo)

Agricultural processions may have marked seasons at Stonehenge

Archaeologists continue to make new discoveries that shed light on the construction and use of Stonehenge. The latest discoveries are "evidence of two huge pits positioned on celestial alignment" marking the rising and setting of the sun.

The Santa marker and the richness of Scottish DNA

Somewhere is Scotland exists one man who carries Santa's DNA, the NM46 marker traced to eastern Siberia and to Lapland, Santa Claus's legendary home. The unidentified man, so far the only one recorded in Scotland, may find himself visited by a relative on Christmas Eve.

"Wow is there a tower" in Alderney!

A team from the Guernsey Museums and the Alderney Society in England has identified a Roman fort concealed in a ruin called the Nunnery. The site is believed to be one of the "best-preserved Roman military structures in the world."

December 25 as Christmas

Scholar Andrew McGowan offers a paper on the Dating of Christmas on the Academia.edu website. Originally published as How December 25th Became Christmas, a 2002 edition of Bible Review, the paper is available in PDF format.

Early Roman burials wow Cirencester experts

Neil Holbrook, chief executive at Cotswold Archaeology, said he "can't underestimate the potential significance" of the discovery of more than 40 graves, dating to early Roman times, in Cirencester, England.

Artifacts spanning 23 centuries declared treasure in Norwich, England

A recent inquest in Norwich, England has resulted in a number of artifacts, dating from 800 BCE through the 15th century CE, being declared treasure. The six groups of treasures were all discovered by metal detector enthusiasts. (photo)

Bath baths in jeopardy

Experts working on the Roman baths in Bath, England, hope that drilling a new borehole will save the hot springs used by the Romans from a geyser that could drain the historic baths.

Istanbul's Hagia Sophia might return to place of worship

The 6th century Byzantine marvel, the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, may be returning to its orgins as a place of worship by once again becoming a mosque. The former church is now a museum.

Orkney Hood re-created

"The project took five and half months and a total of 230 hours to actually make it. But it is fascinating to do something like that. We have not got any garments at all like this, only scraps if we are lucky," said experimental archaeologist Jacqui Wood about her re-creation of the Orkney Hood.

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

"Mysterious" Silk Road city found

Chinese archaeologists believe they have discovered evidence of an important Silk Road city which disappeared in the 3rd century CE.

Archaeologists apply for funding at West Cumbrian site

A team of archaeologists led by Grampus Heritage has applied for UK£200,000 in funding from the Heritage Lottery for a three-year project to escavate Roman remains at Cockermouth and Papcastle in West Cumbria, England where a building thought to be a Roman bath was recently discovered.

Roman medical kit offers insight into Greek influence

Over two thousand years ago, a Roman ship sank off the coast of Italy, near the island of Elba. Among the items on the ship was an ancient medical kit containing a mortar and pestle set, medicine spatulas, and pills and tablets that are surprisingly similar to our modern ones.

60 pairs of Roman shoes found at Scottish supermarket site

One of the largest caches of Roman shoes and sandals ever found in Scotland was discovered recently in Camelon, Scotland when workers at a supermarket construction site unearthed the footwear.

Vindolanda: What I did on my summer vacation

Writer Chris Rowe, winner of a recent Just Back article-writing contest for the travel page of the Telegraph, chronicles a summer-school visit to Vindolanda, the famous Roman fort near Hadrian's Wall in the north of England.

Israeli bus station site of Byzantine houses

More than 70 workers are busy excavating an area beneath the Central Bus Station in Be'er Sheva, Israel. Thus far, the experts have identified the remains of several houses dating to the Byzantine area.

Possible Roman Imperial shipyard discovered in Italy

Experts have discovered a huge building near the center of the complex at the ancient port of Rome which they believe was used for the maintenance of ships. If correct, the building would be part of the Roman Imperial shipyard, the "largest of its kind in Italy or the Mediterranean."