601 CE and Earlier

Bouncy Stonehenge is fun for Druids and kids alike

A giant inflatable replica of Stonehenge is making waves in Glasgow, Scotland. The attraction is part of the Glasgow International art festival.

And the horse he rode in on...

Mildenhall Museum in Suffolk, England is expanding to accommodate a new exhibit, the remains of an Anglo-Saxon warrior and the horse he rode in on - or at least with which he was buried - complete with bridle, sword and shield. (photo)

Gladiators banned from Colosseum

Performers dressed as gladiators will no longer be able to make money having their photos taken with tourists, according to city officials. NPR commentator Renee Montagne has the brief audio report for Morning Edition.

Redeeming qualities of Attila the Hun

On the blog Past Imperfect for the online version of Smithsonian Magazine, Michael D. Blodgett tries to find "Nice Things to Say About Attila the Hun." The greatest, he feels was Attila's "refusal to be seduced by wealth."

Artifacts found at site of Roman fort in Scotland

A team of archaeologists, supervising the installation of a water main through the site of a Roman fort near Kirkton, Scotland, has discovered a cobbled roads and artifacts dating to Roman times.

Latin through the eyes of a gladiator

Marcia Ross of ORR High School in southeastern Massachusetts has found a unique way to teach elementary school age children Latin. She frames the after-school enrichment program as "Latin through the eyes of a gladiator."

Camels in Belgium?

Belgian archeologists Fabienne Pigière and Denis Henrotay have found evidence of camels in Belgium, specifically, camels used by the Romans near military and civilian towns. Their report can be found in an upcoming article for the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Solving the mystery of Roman Wales

Visitors to Caerleon, near Newport in south Wales have long admired the huge 1st century Roman amphitheater, the site of gladiatorial combat, but new discoveries point to the area as an important Roman outpost in Britain. (video)

Hurricane reveals Roman city

A destructive sea storm early in 2012 in Burgas, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea, caused damaged to the waterfront, but also unearthed a previously unknown Roman city. Archaeologists will seek funding for further investigation.

Uncle Samulus wants YOU!

1,800 years ago, a mixed martial arts champion retired from the ring and decided to give back to his country, successfully using his celebrity to recruit for the army.

Medici Venus once wore lipstick

Chemical analysis of the Medici Venus, a 1st century Roman sculpture housed since 1677 at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, has determined that the sensuous lady once had painted lips, gilded hair and jeweled earrings.

Roman kiln found in North Yorkshire

Plans for the new kitchen and classrom space are on hold at Norton primary school in North Yorkshire, England due to the discovery of a Roman kiln, complete with pottery fragments.

New Moon

If you look at a medieval calendar, you'll see a column containing a seemingly random series of Roman numerals. These actually represent the dates of new moons. Like many things in the early calendar, the values are based on a theoretical value rather than the actual astronomical event.

Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Bath

Believed to date from 270 CE, more than 30,000 Roman coins were found in 2007 in Bath, England.

A brief history of prosthetics

This facinating photo gallery traces the history of artificial limbs from ancient Egypt though the Rennaisance and into modern times.

Walking Roman London

Visitors to London may be interested in the Secret City Tour, a walking tour of London's Roman past, including the remains of the Roman fort and Roman city wall, built around 200 CE.

Iron age bog man gets his head examined

Worsely Man, the 1st century CE skull of a man found in an English bog in 1958, has been sent to Manchester Children's Hospital for a CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scan.

Lynn Museum acquires Roman fertility pendant

A grant has allowed the Lynn Museum near Norfolk, England to purchase a solid gold Roman pendant crafted in the shape of a phallus. The rare find, in excellent condition, was discovered last year by a metal detectorist. (photo - PG-13)

Peterborough home of Roman "rich and famous"

A farm in Itter Crescent, outside Peterborough, England, has held a secret for nearly 2,000 years, a secret revealed by the recent discovery of "a substantial, two-floor courtyard limestone Roman villa with rooms floored with mosaic on the sides of a cobbled courtyard," on the site.

"Y-shaped" Roman structure stumps archaeologists

Archaeologists are puzzled about the discovery of a winged-shaped building which appears to be unique in the Roman Empire in Norfolk, England. The 3rd century structure can be seen in aerial photographs. (photo)

Iranian luxury at the Freer and Sackler Galleries

The Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. are hosting the exhibit "Feast Your Eyes" on Ancient Iranian Luxury Metalwork beginning February 4, 2012. The exhibit "explores the beauty, role and function of luxury metalwork in ancient Iran."

Roman mosaic corridor to go on display in Gloucestershire

Victorian excavations at the site of the Chedworth Roman Villa in Gloucestershire, England led to some surprises, including a 35m (115ft) long Roman mosaic floor, "one of the longest in-situ corridor mosaics in the country." Soon the mosaic will be displayed for the public. (photo)

Roman brothel coin first of its kind found in Britain

London pastry chef Regis Cursan must have been surprised by his discovery of an ancient coin near Putney Bridge in West London, especially since the coin "depicts a man and a woman engaged in an intimate act." (photos)

"Bruises and bloody noses are part of the deal" at Trier's gladiator school

Residents of Trier, Germany's oldest city, have become accustomed to the sounds of battle cries and metal on metal as more and more citizens join the city's gladiator school in its 2000-year-old Roman arena.

Early Christian art on display in New York

Visitors to New York City with an interest in Byzantine or Early Christian art may want to pay a visit to the Onassis Cultural Center in Midtown Manhattan to view Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd – 7th Century AD, a display of 170 pieces of art from museums in Greece and Cyprus.

Wroxeter’s Roman Town House copes with tourist increase

When Channel Four TV challenged a team of builders to construct a Roman town house, it never expected the crowds of visitors to converge on the site, leading English Heritage to require emergency repairs. The Roman Town House was the subject of the Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day program. (video)

Evidence suggest that London was built by Iceni slaves

An essay from a recent issue of British Archaeology suggests that the city of London was  built as a military base by the captured Iceni tribesmen of rebel Queen Boudica, who were then executed. Author Dominic Perring bases his theory on the discovery of hundreds of skulls of young males.

Byzantine oil jar suggests trade Mediterranean

The Israel Antiquities Authority reports that remnants of a Byzantine oil jar, dating to the 6th century, has been found on Netanya's Poleg beach. The presence of the large jar suggests trade in olive oil along the Israeli coast. (photo)

Roman cockerel found in child's grave in Cirencester

Archaeologist Neil Holbrook, chief executive at Cotswold Archaeology, called the discovery of an 1,800-year-old enamelled cockerel figurine in the grave of a child a "most spectacular" find. The figurine is believed to have religious significance. (photo)

Jewish bread stamp found in Acre

In the Israeli city of Acre around 500 CE, Larry the Baker left his mark. A ceramic Byzantine bread stamp has been unearthed bearing the classic Jewish seven branch Menorah and the name "Laurentius" written out in Greek letters.