601 CE and Earlier

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

Falkirk historian to team with Historic Scotland to promote Antonine Wall

In 2008, the Antonine Wall, which runs between the firths of the Forth and Clyde in Scotland, was added to UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Now Historic Scotland hopes to team with citizens from the Falkirk district to promote the area as a tourist destination.

"World's biggest shipwreck collection" revealed under Bosphorus

Since 2006, construction workers in Istanbul have worked along with archaeologists to uncover layer after layer of Byzantine history buried beneath the city and the Bosphorus Strait. Now the transit and tunnel project has revealed the "world's biggest shipwreck collection ever found."

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

Mosaic floors highlight Byzantine excavations in Turkey

“During these excavations, we found the ruins of a church and mosaics that are believed to date from the late Roman and Byzantine periods,” said Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Abdullah Kılıç about recent excavations in Isparta, Turkey. (photo)

What made Rome great?

Evan Andrews of the History Channel online discusses the innovations that made Rome great in his article 10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome.

Ancient Japanese warrior found still wearing his armor

A skeleton of a man wearing metal armor has been found in Gunma, Japan. The armor dates to the early 6th century and is very well preserved.

Romans invade Burbank

Romans in Burbank, California? Why not? On December 15-16, 2012, French troupe Histore'Event will present Spartacus and the Roman Legion at the Equestrian Center in Burbank. Burbank Leader reporter L. Thompson has the story.

6th century tsunami devasted Lake Geneva

New research shows that a killer tsunami devastated the shoreline of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in the 6th century, swamping villages around the lake. The disaster is believed to have been caused by falling rocks on the Rhone River side of the lake.

Hadrian's Wall: England's defendable border

Owen Jarus takes a look at Hadrian's Wall in a recent feature story on the Live Science website. The article traces the history of the wall and its importance to the study of Roman life in England.

"Beautifully carved" Roman sarcophagus found in English garden

An eagle-eyed art expert is responsible for the discovery of a 2nd century Roman sarcophagus overgrown with plants in a Dorset, England garden. The "rare and beautifully carved" sarcophagus is expected to sell at auction for UK£50,000. (photo)

Mystery of the Roman die solved

Over forty years ago, a little ivory cube was discovered in Frocester near Stroud, England. The cube was soon identified as a Roman die, and now, a mystery surrounding it has been solved: The game piece was crafted from elephant ivory. (photo)

Roman cemetery could rewrite history of Roman Banwell

Construction on a UK£3.6million main between Banwell and Hutton, England is being held up while archaeologists investigate an unearthed Roman cemetery, possibly linked to a villa, containing a huge hoard of artifacts. (photos)

6th century baptistery found in Kosovo

Turkish archaeologists have discovered a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period in Kosovo’s ancient city of Ulpiana. “Baptisteries are rarely found in this region. We have succeeded in making a very important finding, as part of the first excavation Turkey has carried out abroad," said Professor Haluk Çetinkaya who led the team. (photo)

Byzantine jewelry sparkles in New York gallery show

Les Enluminures gallery in New York City will present Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium, its fall 2012 show featuring Byzantine jewelry from the 3rd through 10th centuries. The exhibit will be open November 2 to 30, 2012 with  possible auction taking place in December.

Anglo Saxon discovery at Caistor St Edmund changes minds about 5th century England

Excavations at the Roman town of Venta Icenorum at at Caistor St Edmund, near Norwich, England, are changing minds about life in 5th century Britain. The discovery of an Anglo Saxon building "showed the site was far more complex than first thought, and not solely a Roman settlement."

Roman border walls

Most students of Roman history are familiar with Hadrian's Wall in northern Britain, but Roman border walls can be found throughout what was once the Roman Empire. Andrew Curry of National Geographic Magazine has the feature story.

Early Irish monastery discovery "beyond wildest dreams"

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of an early medieval monastery in Carrowmore, Co Donegal, Ireland. The site was previously known as an early Christian settlement, but the discovery of a circular boundary wall leads experts to believe that a monastery was located there.

Volunteers encouraged to help excavate Roman bath house

Archaeologists from the Grampus Heritage team are encouraging volunteers to take part in excavations to uncover a Roman bath house at the Derventio site near Papcastle, England. “This is genuinely a once in a lifetime opportunity because I don’t believe you will see something like this again in my lifetime.," said Mark Graham, project manager.

Another Saturday night with the Scots and Roman legions

Stracathro Fort near Stirling, Scotland, the world’s most northerly Roman fort, may have been served by a wine bar or pub. Archaeologists woring on the Roman Gas Project discovered a settlement adjacent to the fort including "a large square room – the equivalent of a public bar – and fronted on to a paved area, akin to a modern beer garden."

Archaeologists explore Vindolanda's water system

In 1930, Prof Eric Birley first recorded the pipework for the water supply at the Roman fort Vindolanda in Northumberland, England. Recently his grandson, Dr Andrew Birley, continued the legacy by identifying the spring-head and piping system for the fort.

"Exotic items from abroad" found at Norse site in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered a wealth of artifacts dating from the late Iron Age through to the end of the Viking era on the west side of the island of South Uist in Scotland. Included among the artifacts was a piece of bone marked with an ogham inscription.

Early Byzantine fortress and settlement found in Bulgaria

An archaeological team led by archaeologist Ivan Hristov has discovered a 5th century Byzantine town and fortress on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Experts believe the town was destroyed by an Avar invasion which sealed the area in the way Vesuvius sealed Herculaneum.

Cursed in Kent

Poor Sacratus, Constitutus and Memorianus must have had a bad time in Roman Kent, England. Their names were found among 11 others on a lead "curse tablet" discovered recently by the Maidstone Area Archaeological Group.

Roman trading vessel, cargo found in Italy

"There are some broken jars around the wreck, but we believe that most of the amphorae inside the ship are still sealed and food filled," Lt. Col. Francesco Schilardi about a 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck found recently off the coast of the Italian city of Genoa.

Highway excavation produces ancient treasures in Romania

The excavation for a new highway in Romania has unearthed a plethora of artifacts - from Greek and Roman coins to a Celtic miniature chariot. Archaeologists have taken control of the site with the goal to preserve the artifacts for the country.

Channel Islands' Roman fort "probably the best in Britain"

Archaeologists working on the oldest standing building in the Channel Islands, a small Roman fort, are pondering the possible decision to turn the building into a visitor center.

Unearthed Roman road changes historians' maps

The patrons of the Stockwell Arms, in Colchester, England, probably never dreamed that they were having a pint atop the remains of a 1st century Roman road. The road was revealed recently after reconstruction of the pub.

Sicily's Roman mosaics return to public view

The 4th century Roman mosaics at the Villa del Casale at the Piazza Armerina in Sicily are considered “the finest in situ in the Roman world.” Now the newly-restored stone tiles are again open to the public. (photo)

Large Roman cemetery found in Norfolk

Excavations for a housing development in Great Ellingham, Norfolk, England have uncovered a large cemetery dating to Roman times. The 85 graves are thought to belong to a rural settlement.