601 CE and Earlier

Grave of Russian warrior yields weapons and treasure

Excavations of a grave in the Caucasus mountains in Russia have revealed a man buried with gold, armor, and weapons. The burial dates to between 400 BCE and 200 CE.

Shoes of Roman children correct myth about military life

Professor Elizabeth Greene looks at shoes differently than most people. At the recent 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, she presented research on how Roman children's shoes reflected their family status, especially in military familities.

Hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins

Slightly out-of-period, but interesting nonetheless, is an instruction video by hairdresser Janet Stephens re-creating the hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins of ancient Rome. The Seni Crines is the oldest known hairstyle in Rome, and influenced later styles.

The re-emergence of Myra

In the 14th century, the city of Myra near Demre, Turkey, disappeared under the silt of the Myros River. Now, 700 years later, the city, once an importance pilgrimage site of the Byzantine Empire, is re-remerging - building by building. (photo)

Retire in beautiful Lincoln!

The city of Lincoln, England has been a Roman outpost since the first century. Situated on the trade route between London and York, the area was first a fortress town and later a colonia, a retirement settlement for soldiers who wished to stay in Britain.

Gaming Piece or Roman Toilet Paper?

Think your toilet paper is rough? Try these! Formerly thought to be broken Roman "gaming pieces", these round ceramic  discs are now believed to be the equivalent of a roll of toilet paper.

"Unexpected" Roman theatre found in Kent

Dr Paul Wilkinson, founder of the Kent Archaeological Field School, believes that he and his team have discovered the remains of a Roman theatre - the first in Britain - right in his backyard.

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Army departure leaves Roman lifestyle behind

Archaeologists in Devon County, England are pondering the remains of a Roman settlement which thrived after the Roman army left the area for northern conquests.

Experts stumped by Roman earring

The design on a gold earring disc, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Keswick, England, has experts stumped. The disc dates to the Roman era and "features a scorpion, phallus, snake and crab." (photo)

Gypsies originated in NW India

A new genetic study published in Current Biology reveals that European Gypsies originated in northwest India and migrated to the Balkan area of Europe in the 6th century. The study was led by David Comas of Spain's Institute of Evolutionary Biology,

Roman-era tartan?

A tiny piece of cloak depicted in a Roman statue may be the "the first-ever depiction of tartan". The plaid appears on a bronze statue of the Emperor Caracalla with a bound Caledonian warrior wearing what appears to be tartan trews. The statue was found in the Moroccan city of Volubilis. (video)

The souvenirs of Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall in northern England has long been a tourist attraction, but souvenirs, highlighted in a new book by Roman expert David Breeze, shows that the wall attracted tourists soon after it was built. (photo)

Constantinian basilica found in Bulgaria

The discovery of a 4th century basilica in Sofia, Bulgaria leads experts to speculate that emperor Constantine the Great might have had plans to create a centre of Christianity in the area.

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

Falkirk historian to team with Historic Scotland to promote Antonine Wall

In 2008, the Antonine Wall, which runs between the firths of the Forth and Clyde in Scotland, was added to UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Now Historic Scotland hopes to team with citizens from the Falkirk district to promote the area as a tourist destination.

"World's biggest shipwreck collection" revealed under Bosphorus

Since 2006, construction workers in Istanbul have worked along with archaeologists to uncover layer after layer of Byzantine history buried beneath the city and the Bosphorus Strait. Now the transit and tunnel project has revealed the "world's biggest shipwreck collection ever found."

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

Mosaic floors highlight Byzantine excavations in Turkey

“During these excavations, we found the ruins of a church and mosaics that are believed to date from the late Roman and Byzantine periods,” said Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Abdullah Kılıç about recent excavations in Isparta, Turkey. (photo)

What made Rome great?

Evan Andrews of the History Channel online discusses the innovations that made Rome great in his article 10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome.

Ancient Japanese warrior found still wearing his armor

A skeleton of a man wearing metal armor has been found in Gunma, Japan. The armor dates to the early 6th century and is very well preserved.

Romans invade Burbank

Romans in Burbank, California? Why not? On December 15-16, 2012, French troupe Histore'Event will present Spartacus and the Roman Legion at the Equestrian Center in Burbank. Burbank Leader reporter L. Thompson has the story.

6th century tsunami devasted Lake Geneva

New research shows that a killer tsunami devastated the shoreline of Lake Geneva in Switzerland in the 6th century, swamping villages around the lake. The disaster is believed to have been caused by falling rocks on the Rhone River side of the lake.

Hadrian's Wall: England's defendable border

Owen Jarus takes a look at Hadrian's Wall in a recent feature story on the Live Science website. The article traces the history of the wall and its importance to the study of Roman life in England.

"Beautifully carved" Roman sarcophagus found in English garden

An eagle-eyed art expert is responsible for the discovery of a 2nd century Roman sarcophagus overgrown with plants in a Dorset, England garden. The "rare and beautifully carved" sarcophagus is expected to sell at auction for UK£50,000. (photo)

Mystery of the Roman die solved

Over forty years ago, a little ivory cube was discovered in Frocester near Stroud, England. The cube was soon identified as a Roman die, and now, a mystery surrounding it has been solved: The game piece was crafted from elephant ivory. (photo)

Roman cemetery could rewrite history of Roman Banwell

Construction on a UK£3.6million main between Banwell and Hutton, England is being held up while archaeologists investigate an unearthed Roman cemetery, possibly linked to a villa, containing a huge hoard of artifacts. (photos)

6th century baptistery found in Kosovo

Turkish archaeologists have discovered a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period in Kosovo’s ancient city of Ulpiana. “Baptisteries are rarely found in this region. We have succeeded in making a very important finding, as part of the first excavation Turkey has carried out abroad," said Professor Haluk Çetinkaya who led the team. (photo)

Byzantine jewelry sparkles in New York gallery show

Les Enluminures gallery in New York City will present Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium, its fall 2012 show featuring Byzantine jewelry from the 3rd through 10th centuries. The exhibit will be open November 2 to 30, 2012 with  possible auction taking place in December.

Anglo Saxon discovery at Caistor St Edmund changes minds about 5th century England

Excavations at the Roman town of Venta Icenorum at at Caistor St Edmund, near Norwich, England, are changing minds about life in 5th century Britain. The discovery of an Anglo Saxon building "showed the site was far more complex than first thought, and not solely a Roman settlement."