601 CE and Earlier

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

The truth about Hadrian's Wall

All may not have been sweetness and light between the Romans and the local inhabitants during the time of the building of Hadrian's Wall in northern England. A new study suggests that the absence of settlements and artifacts proves that the Romans ejected the locals from the area of the wall.

Hadrian’s Wall trail faces erosion challenge

Hadrian's Wall faces a new challenge: waterlogged trails that are causing grass and soil erosion along the trail. Natural England has awarded the Hadrian’s Wall Trust UK£50,000 for drain repair, but visitors can also help.

How Old Is That Clay Pot, Really?

Danish Stone Age pots may not be as old as originally determined if fish were cooked in them.

Lost in the bath

Researchers might often wonder what went on in Roman baths, and now archaeologist Alissa Whitmore believes she may have some answers. For some time, Whitmore has studied objects discovered in the drains of Roman bathhouses, and has presented her findings at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle.

Finest Roman Cockerel

An enameled bronze Roman cockeral has been restored after being found in a child's grave.

Economic crisis may have caused "hacked up" Roman silver

In 1919, archaeologists discovered a hoard of Roman silver at Traprain Law in East Lothian, Scotland composed of piles of "hacked up" Roman silver. They believed the late Roman period treasure was brought to Scotland as loot, but a new study by Dr Fraser Hunter shows that economics may have been the cause of the destruction of the dinnerware. (photo)

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

DNA study shows lasting Roman gift to Britain

Early in the 5th century, the Romans departed from Britain, leaving behind roads, artifacts, walls, and something else. A new DNA study shows that up to 4 million British men carry Italian genetics, and of that, one million probably originate with the Romans.

Grave of Russian warrior yields weapons and treasure

Excavations of a grave in the Caucasus mountains in Russia have revealed a man buried with gold, armor, and weapons. The burial dates to between 400 BCE and 200 CE.

Shoes of Roman children correct myth about military life

Professor Elizabeth Greene looks at shoes differently than most people. At the recent 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, she presented research on how Roman children's shoes reflected their family status, especially in military familities.

Hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins

Slightly out-of-period, but interesting nonetheless, is an instruction video by hairdresser Janet Stephens re-creating the hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins of ancient Rome. The Seni Crines is the oldest known hairstyle in Rome, and influenced later styles.

The re-emergence of Myra

In the 14th century, the city of Myra near Demre, Turkey, disappeared under the silt of the Myros River. Now, 700 years later, the city, once an importance pilgrimage site of the Byzantine Empire, is re-remerging - building by building. (photo)

Retire in beautiful Lincoln!

The city of Lincoln, England has been a Roman outpost since the first century. Situated on the trade route between London and York, the area was first a fortress town and later a colonia, a retirement settlement for soldiers who wished to stay in Britain.

Gaming Piece or Roman Toilet Paper?

Think your toilet paper is rough? Try these! Formerly thought to be broken Roman "gaming pieces", these round ceramic  discs are now believed to be the equivalent of a roll of toilet paper.

"Unexpected" Roman theatre found in Kent

Dr Paul Wilkinson, founder of the Kent Archaeological Field School, believes that he and his team have discovered the remains of a Roman theatre - the first in Britain - right in his backyard.

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Army departure leaves Roman lifestyle behind

Archaeologists in Devon County, England are pondering the remains of a Roman settlement which thrived after the Roman army left the area for northern conquests.

Experts stumped by Roman earring

The design on a gold earring disc, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Keswick, England, has experts stumped. The disc dates to the Roman era and "features a scorpion, phallus, snake and crab." (photo)

Gypsies originated in NW India

A new genetic study published in Current Biology reveals that European Gypsies originated in northwest India and migrated to the Balkan area of Europe in the 6th century. The study was led by David Comas of Spain's Institute of Evolutionary Biology,

Roman-era tartan?

A tiny piece of cloak depicted in a Roman statue may be the "the first-ever depiction of tartan". The plaid appears on a bronze statue of the Emperor Caracalla with a bound Caledonian warrior wearing what appears to be tartan trews. The statue was found in the Moroccan city of Volubilis. (video)

The souvenirs of Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall in northern England has long been a tourist attraction, but souvenirs, highlighted in a new book by Roman expert David Breeze, shows that the wall attracted tourists soon after it was built. (photo)

Constantinian basilica found in Bulgaria

The discovery of a 4th century basilica in Sofia, Bulgaria leads experts to speculate that emperor Constantine the Great might have had plans to create a centre of Christianity in the area.

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

Falkirk historian to team with Historic Scotland to promote Antonine Wall

In 2008, the Antonine Wall, which runs between the firths of the Forth and Clyde in Scotland, was added to UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Now Historic Scotland hopes to team with citizens from the Falkirk district to promote the area as a tourist destination.

"World's biggest shipwreck collection" revealed under Bosphorus

Since 2006, construction workers in Istanbul have worked along with archaeologists to uncover layer after layer of Byzantine history buried beneath the city and the Bosphorus Strait. Now the transit and tunnel project has revealed the "world's biggest shipwreck collection ever found."

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

Mosaic floors highlight Byzantine excavations in Turkey

“During these excavations, we found the ruins of a church and mosaics that are believed to date from the late Roman and Byzantine periods,” said Provincial Culture and Tourism Director Abdullah Kılıç about recent excavations in Isparta, Turkey. (photo)

What made Rome great?

Evan Andrews of the History Channel online discusses the innovations that made Rome great in his article 10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome.

Ancient Japanese warrior found still wearing his armor

A skeleton of a man wearing metal armor has been found in Gunma, Japan. The armor dates to the early 6th century and is very well preserved.