601 CE and Earlier

Deutsche Welle: Roman Trier Attracts History Buffs

Trier, the oldest city in Germany, has been called "Roma Secunda", the second Rome, and is full of Roman monuments.

English Elm Imported by Romans

Botanists believe that all English elm trees may be descended from one tree brought to England by the Romans.

Ocean Erosion Threatens Roman Burial Site

Archaeologists are concerend about the future of a Roman burial site near Maryport in Cumbria which is being battered by the sea.

24 Hour Museum: Experts Analyze Bog Butter

Researchers have been studying the "bog butter" regularly found buried in peat bogs in Scotland and Ireland for clues to what the substance really was.

Pravda: Crimean Burial Mound Contains Occult Items

Russian archaeologists have discovered a burial mound containing the remains of a lavishly dressed woman as well as items suggesting "the woman's professional involvement in the world of witchcraft and magic."

News & Star: Carlisle Named Top Site by Archaeologists

John Zant of Oxford Archaeology North has declared Carlisle, England "one of top Roman dig sites."

Forest Got the Best of Roman Army

It wasn't barbarians who defeated the armies of Rome in Scotland, but the country's impenetrable forest, according to a new book by Chris Smout.

New Sections of 5th Century Synagogue Unearthed in Albania

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a 5th or 6th century synagogue near the coastal city of Saranda have uncovered impressive new structures.

Did 2nd Century Comet Shake Roman World?

Scientists believe that a field of craters around Lake Chiemsee in southern Germany is the result of a comet striking in earth in the second century.

Badgers Damage Salisbury Burial Mounds

Badgers? We Don't Need No Stinking Badgers! OK, I couldn't resist! But badgers are reportedly doing serious damage to prehistoric burial mounds on Salisbury Plain.

Loch Lomond Site Offers Wealth of Artifacts

Archaeologists working on a site near Loch Lomond have discovered evidence of settlements dating back 3500 years, including a 7th century Christian cemetery.

Cumberland News: 1st Century Roman Armor Preserved in Clay

Hundreds of thousands of metal artifacts, including scale armor, from a Roman fort have been preserved by a layer of clay.

Iron Age Horse Burial Discovered in North Yorkshire

Experts are investigating the ceremonial burial site of four horses dating to the 1st century C.E. discovered recently in North Yorkshire, England.

Was beer really the staff of life?

Carrie Lock of Science News looks at the history of beer and breweries from ancient times to the present.

24 Hour Museum: Roman Bridge Excavations "Spectacular"

"It's really spectacular. It's far more than we could have anticipated," said Margaret Snape of Tyne and Wear Museums about the excavation of what is thought to be the largest stone bridge in Roman Britain.

Making Their Mark: the History of Ink

Sharon J. Huntington of the Christian Science Monitor looks at the history of ink from prehistory through medieval times and up to the nineteenth century.

1st Century Roman Horse Ornament Found in Croatia

A small, crescent-shaped ornament designed to be worn by a horse has been discovered near the Croatian city of Drnis.

Byzantine architecture leaves its mark

Ian Campbell of the Scotsman looks at the history and influence of Byzantine architecture.

Plans Proposed to Make Antonine Wall World Heritage Site

Scotland's Antonine Wall, the most northernly reach of the Roman Empire in Britain, is the subject of a campaign to gain World Heritage status for the site.

£67.5m Visitors' Centre Planned for Stonehenge

English Heritage has unveiled its plans for a new visitor center at Stonehenge at a cost of UK£67.5m.

Lost Stretch of Hadrian's Wall Discovered in Newcastle Garden

Eileen Maas, a Newcastle grandmother, was delighted to learn that her garden wall is a lost section of Hadrian's Wall.

Surrey Online: Roman Treasure Trove Discovered in Surrey

One of the largest caches of Roman coins ever discovered has been found on a farm near Leigh, England.

DNA Shows Scottish-Spanish Relation

A new study by geneticists at Dublin’s Trinity College proves that the Irish and Scots are more closely related to Spaniards than to the Celts of central Europe.

Irish Independent: A Wealth of New Archeaological Sites Discovered in Ireland

Archaeologists working along the M3 in Ireland have discovered 28 new sites including prehistoric burial sites and a medieval house and field system.

Vacation in an Iron Age Village!

Visitors to England near the Forest of Dean may get the chance to live in an Iron Age village, wearing costumes, foraging for food, and learning the arts of residents of the time period.

Cambridge News: Chalk Horse Discovered in Cambridgeshire

A chalk horse, discovered in a farmer's field near Whittlesford, England, has sent researchers scurrying for answers.

Haaretz: 6th Century Manuscript Gives Insight into Scholar's World

David Rapp of Haaretz International takes a look at the Vienna Genesis, a 6th century illuminated biblical codex held by the Austrian National Library in Vienna.

Chedworth Roman Villa Receives Sandford Award

The Chedworth Roman Villa in Gloucestershire, England has been awarded the prestigious Sandford Award for the excellent quality of its eductional program and administrative management.

Did Spice Make the Ancient World Go Round?

David Rosenthal reviews Spice: The History of a Temptation by Jack Turner, a new book which theorizes that spice brought about the downfall of Rome.

Torlonia Marbles to be open to the public

A collection of more than 600 marble statues and tombs from the Roman period will once again be open to the public.