601 CE and Earlier

New Techniques Used to Recreate Roman Imperial Cloth

Researchers working on the Roman city of Pompeii are using ancient methods to re-create the Roman imperial cloth used for togas.

Hawks to Protect Herculaneum from Pigeons

Humans are not the only visitors to the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum. Pigeons have found a goldmine in the tourist hotspot, leaving behind a mess and forcing officials to try a new approach in pest control: hawks.

Prehistoric Scots Tied to Middle East

A new book and television series claim that 20% of Scots have blood ties to Iraq stemming from a migration in 4000 BCE.

Roman archaeological find may be part of Nero's palace

When Roman Emperor Nero was deposed, his contemporaries went to great lengths to obliterate his legacy, burying his Domus Aurea (Golden House) with debris. Officials in Rome have revealed a mosaic the size of a large door that suggests that Nero's palace ruins may be remarkably well-preserved under the hill that covers them.

Chariot Race Track Discovered in Colchester

The remains of a Roman chariot track have been discovered under an army barracks in Colchester, England.

Noisy Toys Nothing New

The Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust has evidence that noisy toys may date back to the Bronze Age.

Romans Pioneered Luxury Housing and Shopping Malls

New research in England's Roman city of Bath leads archaeologists to believe that wealthy citizens built homes in luxury clusters and shopped in commercial districts.

Deansway Research Report Documents City's History

The Council of British Archaeology has published Excavations at Deansway, a report documenting the excavations beneath a British shopping center that revealed the city's past from Roman times through the Middle Ages.

History of Roses Explored

Roses have fascinated gardeners for generations. This short article looks at the history of the flower.

Times Online: Amazon Warriors Fought with Roman Army

Archaeologists have identified remains found in a cemetery in Cumbria, England as belonging to two Amazon warriors, proving that women fought with the Roman army.

24 Hour Museum: Man Sentenced to Prison for Theft of Artifacts

Raymond Tebble of South Shields, England, was convicted of "going equipped for theft" to an archaeolical site in Leicestershire, England, and was sentenced to one month in prison. His metal detector was confiscated.

Leeds Today: Roman Infantryman's Sword Acquired by Royal Armouries

A 2,000-year-old Roman infantry sword "autographed" by its original owner, has been added to the collection of Great Britain's Royal Armouries.

Early Medieval Buildings Discovered in Winchester

An archaeological dig at Northgate House in Winchester, England has unearthed well-preserved remains of several early medieval buildings.

Evening Star: 6th Century Jewelry Fragments Declared Treasure

A treasure trove inquest held recently in Great Suffolk, England, has declared a collection of jewelry fragments discovered by a metal detector to be treasure.

Kathimerini: Eleutherna Sheds Light on History of Crete

Archaeologists excavating the ancient city of Eleutherna on Crete are finding evidence of continuous occupation from the 9th B.C.E. until the 14th century C.E.

Iranian Warrior was Female

DNA tests have shown the remains of a 2,000-year-old warrior in an Iranian tomb are those of a woman.

Researchers find the real face of Father Christmas

According to forensic research conducted for a BBC2 documentary, "The Real Face of Santa," Saint Nicholas was short, olive-skinned and had a broken nose.

Roman Fort to Become English Heritage Site

The Cumbria County Council has transferred management of the Birdoswald Roman Fort on Hadrian's Wall to English Heritage.

Iran "Cradle of Board Games"

Iranian archaeologists have discovered a 5,000-year-old backgammon set, thought to be the world's oldest, making the country the "cradle of board games."

Roman "Rest Stops" Captivate Historians

Archaeologists working on a site near Neuss, Germany have discovered the remains of a Roman rest stop, including a service station, restaurant and a hotel.

Site of Greek-Roman Battle Discovered

A Greek farmer recently discovered a stone monument marking the 1st century B.C.E. battle between Mithridates VI and Roman forces.

New Theory on Construction of Stonehenge

Derbyshire carpenter Patrick Weir has a new theory on the construction of Stonehenge and how the massive stones were transported to Salisbury Plain.

National Geographic: Some Tattoos Traced to Crusades

An article by Cassandra Franklin-Barbajosa for National Geographic traces the history of tattoos, including the use of the Jerusalem cross during the Crusades.

New Saxon Graves Found at Marlborough

The graves of five Saxon warriors were discovered on the weekend at Marlborough by metal detecting enthusiasts.

Haaretz: Acre Burial Site Proves to be Roman

A burial site near Acre, once believed to have been a Jewish cemetery, has turned out to be Roman.

Evening Star: Roman Brewery Timbers Displayed in Ipswich

Timbers from a 2nd century Roman brewery have been returned to England and are now on display in an Ipswich museum.

Novosti: 4,000-Year-Old "Stonehenge" Discovered in Russia

A 4,000-year-old megalithic structure has been discovered in central Russia.

Legendary Atlantis Found?

American researcher Robert Sarmast claims to have discovered the legendary island of Atlantis off the coast of Cyprus.

About: "Alexander's" Props and Costumes Fanatically Authentic

Out of SCA time period, but still interesting, is an article on the costumes of sets of Oliver Stone's Alexander.

Roman cosmetic secrets revealed

An archaeological dig at Southwark in London has turned up a tin of Roman face-cosmetic, according to scientists at Bristol University.