601 CE and Earlier

Pompeii Treasure Trove Revealed

In 2000, archaeologists working on a Roman bath at the site of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Pompeii, Italy, were thrilled to discover a wicker basket containing a treasure trove of silver artifacts.

Times: St. George Inspired by Syrian Mosaic?

Experts are wondering if a newly-discovered mosaic depicting Bellerophon, mounted on Pegasus stabbing a chimera with a lance is might have been an inspiration for St. George and the dragon.

Bronze Orpheus Might Point to Tomb

Archaeologists working on a site near the village of Tatul in Bulgaria are hoping that the discovery of a rare bronze statue of Orpheus might lead to the hero's tomb.

Norfolk Site of Celtic Resistance

New evidence points to the English city of Norfolk as being a hub of Celtic resistance against Roman occupation. It may also have been the site of a "lost holocaust".

Toronto Company Hopes to Mine on Roman Site

Rio Narcea Gold Mines Ltd., a mining company based in Toronto, Canada, is battling archaeologists for the rights to a gold mine which lies beneath a Roman town in Asturias, Spain.

Time Team Hunts for Roman Treasure

Britain's Channel Four Time Team has opened new trenches at Dinnington, England with hopes of discovering Roman gold.

Gladiator Games Attract Tourists in Jordan

Dale Gavlak of the Associated Press reports on gladiator games which are being held in the Roman ruins of Jerash, Jordan. The games will feature chariot racing and gladiatorial combat that are sure crowd pleasers.

Stonehenge Quarry Found

University professor Tim Darvill believes he has discovered the Welsh quarry where the bluestones, which form the circle of Stonehenge, were mined.

Wales Center of Roman Military Might

The 2003 discovery of a large Roman fort near Dinefwr in Carmarthenshire, Wales has experts rewriting the Romans' place in Welsh history.

Iron Age Farm Discovered in England

Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age settlement on farmaland near the English city of Cheltenham.

Which Solstice for Stonehenge?

While Stonehenge is a popular attraction for those wishing to celebrate the Summer Solstice, the monument may actually have been constructed to celebrate the Winter holiday.

Deutsche Welle: German "Murder Victim" Actually Bog Girl

A mummified body, originally believed to be a murder victim, has been identified as that of a teenage girl... a 2,700-year-old teenage girl. The remains were discovered in a peat bog near Uchte, Lower Saxony.

New exhibit on ancient Yemeni art at the Sackler

"Caravan Kingdoms: Yemen and the Ancient Incense Trade" is now on display at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in Washington, DC.

Cellphone Tower Damages Japanese Burial Site

The construction of a cellphone tower near Osaka, Japan has seriously damaged a previsouly undisturbed sixth century tomb.

Teacher Works to Excavate Roman Fort in Romania

A Mississippi high school teacher is among the archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort at Halmyris in the delta where the Danube River empties into the Black Sea.

History of Tablet Weaving Exhibit in Germany

Alamennenmuseum Ellwangen, near Ulm, Germany, is hosting an exhibit on the history of tablet weaving from 1000 B.C. E. to the early Middle Ages and Viking periods.

Hi-Tech Gadgets to Help Read Manuscripts

The world's oldest monastery, Saint Catherine's in the Sinai Desert, plans to use hi-tech cameras to shed new light on ancient Christian texts preserved for centuries within its fortress walls.

Roodee Highlights Roman Festival

A Roman Roodee, which includes chariot races and gladiator fights, has become a popular feature of Chester, England's Roman Festival. The event takes place June 25-26, 2005.

2nd Century Roman Barge Discovered in Rhine

A well-preserved Roman barge has been discovered at the bottom of the Rhine River in the Netherlands. The vessel is the oldest of its type ever discovered in the country.

Ancient Britain Remapped

Ordnance Survey of Southampton, England, is set to release a new historical map of ancient Britain, complete with place names, roads and landmarks.

Roman/Celtic Coins Found in Netherlands

Archaeologists working on a dig in the Netherlands have discovered 17 ancient Celtic coins. The coins were the first such discovered in the country.

Eat Like a Roman

Visitors to the archaeological site at Pompeii can get a firsthand idea of the Roman diet by purchasing kits containing ingredients commonly found on Roman tables.

Carlisle Visitors Received Royal Treatment

Visitors to Roman Carlisle received royal treatment, according to new archaeological finds which included the remains of a bathhouse.

Loch Lomond Dig is "Archaeologist's Dream"

A recent archaeological dig near Loch Lomond, Scotland, has produced rare artifacts from periods spanning 4,000 years.

Synagogue Mosaics to be Exhibited

The Brooklyn Museum will present an exhibition of 21 Roman mosaics from an ancient synagogue when it hosts Tree of Paradise: Jewish Mosaics from the Roman Empire.

Socks With Sandals?

Not just for dorks anymore! New evidence shows that Romans made the wearing of socks with sandals ultra chic!

National Geographic: Antibiotics in African Beer Gave Health Boost

A new study of the bones of 4th century Nubian people from the Sudan in North Africa leads experts to speculate that their beer may have had antibiotic properties.

New Section of Hadrian's Wall Discovered

A team of archaeologists have identified artifacts and wall fragments, discovered during a road construction project, as belonging to a previously unknown section of Hadrian's Wall.

Particle Accelerator used to reveal Archimedes' words on Palimpsest

The only known copy of Archimedes work known as the treatise "Method of Mechanical Theorems" may soon be visible again.

Quarry Dig Reveals Iron Age Shoe

The oldest Iron Age shoe ever discovered in the United Kingdom has been unearthed at a quarry near Wellington, England. The 2,000-year-old shoe has still visible lace holes.